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  • GCHQ
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Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
96
4.6 out of 5 stars
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on 4 August 2017
A good read
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on 21 June 2017
Bought as a gift. Recipient very happy.
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on 18 July 2017
An excellent and informative read
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on 30 March 2014
If you have taken a passing interest in the Manning or Snowden revelations, this book explores how GCHQ and NSA have come to be.
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on 13 April 2016
Interesting but a little slow to start.
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on 29 July 2010
The great thing about this book is that it isn't a sensationalist revelation from an ex. member of the intelligence services, but a research based book using open sources. The line 'there are no secrets, just lazy researchers' is very apt.

The information about some of the big stories of the last century are fascinating - the General Belgrano where SIGINT had picked up a command for it to proceed to task force and sink British ships, and its zig zag course meant that it was true when the Argentinians said it was outside exclusion zone, and sailing away from Falkland islands at the time it was hit. There was no other real decision for the British commanders to take.

As someone who lives in Cheltenham, it is great to see some of the big episodes of GCHQ, and also the relationship with the US.

First class book and to be recommended for anyone with an interest in this area!
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on 18 October 2010
America's signals intelligence "special relationship" with the UK was surprising to me, as it really does (did?) seem to be close (as opposed to the "special relationship" much touted and abused as a concept by the media nowadays). So I found this book just as interesting from the wider political perspective, as well as the detail about GCHQ's activities.

Only drawback for me was the one or two references to how other academics' writings were wrong. Academics can't resist an opportunity for an argument.
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on 15 August 2010
I was immediately immersed in this admirable book which I found joined up a great number of dots from previously published literature on the topic. I do, however, that Aldrich or his proof-readers have devoted just a few seconds to UK locations; Chicksands is not near Baldoch (which is in Hertfordshire), rather Bedford. Likewise, Bletchley somehow landed up in Bedfordshire. Small criticisms, though. The notes and bibliography are breath-taking - and will keep me busy for years to come!
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on 20 November 2010
This is a readable and factual book, which contains a series of accounts of episodes in the history of GCHQ and its associated organisations. The first chapters are a little slow, reading as a list or organisational changes, and I was surprised there were not more pages on the work at Bletchley Park in the Second World War. However, the sections on the Cold War, the Falklands and more recent events are gripping.
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on 4 June 2013
GCHQ by Richard Aldrich is a veritable tome of information. The Author is a Professor of History and this is reflected in the style of his book, at times it reads almost like a never-ending list of historical events and utterances.

While the book claims to be an uncensored history of GCHQ, it is important to keep in mind that the sources and historical opinions are largely UK centric. In this respect the book does not provide a wider critical analysis of GCHQ or the role of state surveillance.

I particularly enjoyed the last 100 pages, which chart GCHQ's transition from spying on foreign governments to spying on the civilian population, this highlights a general trend of the Security Services transitioning from the enemy abroad, to the enemy within. With the end of the cold war and a continual decrease in what are deemed rouge or unfriendly states, Western Secret Services have in the past twenty years transitioned from seeing their enemies as foreign states to inventing new enemies in their own populations.

Technology has now made it possible for our governments to record our every move in the digital domain, which provides them with an unprecedented picture of us as individuals. To unleash what are essentially arms of the military on your own civilian population is an extremely worrying development. The Armed Forces have a certain mode of thinking, which in many respects is completely alien to its civilian counterpart and is very likely to lead to complete disaster.
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