Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
11
4.1 out of 5 stars
Format: DVD|Change
Price:£9.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 12 August 2010
Lola is a beautiful French film that has a level of sophistication that one rarely sees in cinema. This story falls into the categories of drama and romance, but it has a magical quantity to it that truly makes it special. Its magic is sure to charm you.

The movie revolves around a cabaret dancer named Cecile, who is better known by her stage name Lola. A couple of guys express some interest in her, but they are not quite what she is looking for. An American sailor named Frankie enjoys spending time with her, but he is very casual about their relationship. Lola also happens to bump into her childhood friend named Roland. They knew each other before the war (WWII) and he is more than a little eager to be with her. Finding out which way her heart will go is all part of the fun (and there is more to the story than just this). Both Roland and Frankie meet a young girl and her mother. There are some parallels between Lola and the young girl. The symmetry between them is unmistakable.

At first glance it may seem that the story is a bit chaotic, as there is so much going on. But at the story progresses, one sees that the characters of the story move like a tango. With the departure of one, sees the arrival of another. Nearly every detail and character is important to the story.

Lola is Jacques Demy's first feature film. Although there are about two-dozen films called "Lola," this 1961 classic is original and unforgettable. It is a delightful film that is sure to appeal to those who enjoy world cinema.
44 Comments| 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Originally conceived as a Technicolor musical but shot on the cheap (so cheap they couldn't even afford a sound crew), Jacques Demy's Lola isn't exactly the masterpiece critics claimed back in 1960, but it is one of the more likable films of the French New Wave, largely because it's less concerned with scoring stylistic points and more interested in people. What's particularly refreshing is that Demy likes these people - all of them, without exception - and never judges them, and that generosity of spirit carries it a long way. Following the role coincidence plays in our lives through its characters whose paths and hearts cross, it staves off complete schmaltz with an awareness that one person's happy ending is often another's missed possibility of happiness: Demy may not be able to resist giving one character a Hollywood Happy Ending, but it does come at a price to another, while other characters lives are left unresolved. There are a few moments where Anouk Aimee's tart with a heart overdoes the Marilyn impersonations (an affectation of the character rather than the actress) and Allan Scott's English dialogue sounds like it's been dubbed by a German reading phonetically, but they're fairly fleeting irritants and there's more than enough elsewhere to make up for it, not least Raoul Coutard's lovingly shot black and white Scope photography of Nantes.

The Region 1 NTSC DVD's 2.35:1 widescreen transfer transfer, taken from a restored version, is good but not outstanding (though with the budgetary limitation the filmmakers had in 1960, it's doubtful it could look much better). Aside from the original theatrical trailer it also includes an extract from the documentary The World of Jacques Demy about the making of the film, though for the section dealing with the forgotten US sequel, Model Shop, you'll have to buy the documentary itself (available separately in the US or in the 2-disc UK PAL DVD of The Umbrellas of Cherbourg).
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 March 2011
In Jacques Demy's film we have the subtle suggestion of easy virtue, without the accompanying sleaze. Lola wants love and a good time - and Demy makes us feel that she is fully entitled to that. This is a beautiful restoration and the quality of the transfer and the beauty of Anouk Aimee makes this a worthy DVD purchase.

Knowing only one other Jacques Demy film, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, it is interesting to see how Demy can take a potentially tragic tale and transform it into something that is immensely watchable without being sentimental or judgemental.Here in Lola, he doesn't have saturated colours or sung dialogue; just a well-observed story and a superb cast.
0Comment| 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 January 2016
Interesting only for some historic scenes of France, but very amateurish. Certainly not any form of 'classic'. Be aware that this is actually a silent movie with a badly dubbed French soundtrack consisting, it seems, of the script being read out post production, rather than anything that might resemble acting. I missed this point when I bought it but the clue was in another review, which suggested that the budget was so low that they couldn't even afford a sound crew. The result is that the dialogue has the same acoustics and intonation whether the characters are in a room or in a moving open top car, and no background sounds either except one or two obvious overlays. Avoid.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
The cover image gives some idea of the beauty of this film, and of its delicacy. Lola is an amazing creation by Anouk Aimee in the title role; she is by turns frothy, charming, scatty, a caring mother, as fragile as a doe and as lovely, and resilient too. A little like in The Philadelphia Story or Les Enfants du Paradis, or Rohmer's A Winter's Tale, the heroine is caught between three men, but one of them is out of reach, and he is the only one she really wants. However he has returned and she keeps having near misses while thinking he is still on the other side of the world ... The film opens up beyond this, however, in the form of a subplot in which we see a young girl fall for one of the unhappy two and experience a first infatuation with this sailor exactly as Lola had done for the man on whom everything now depends still. We get a sense of repetition and the working of fate that is incredibly touching, it is so lightly held. In this way it is exactly in the image of the heroine. The whole thing is devastatingly romantic and the subtle reflections multiply and make it even more exquisite. It is shot in widescreen and gives a very atmospheric evocation of Nantes with its covered arcade, to which Jacques Demy would return in later films ... the soundtrack features Beethoven's 7th symphony in a stroke of genius that provides a granite-like sense of destiny alongside the fabulous delicacy of the plot and its fascinating heroine. Frankie also provides a freewheeling blond charm as the sailor, set against the bookish, existential angst of the other suitor. The real thing, driving around in a white suit and car, makes you wonder if you wouldn't have gone for Frankie if you'd been her, but subjectivity is at the heart of passion and the film makes us realise this too.
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Originally conceived as a Technicolor musical but shot on the cheap (so cheap they couldn't even afford a sound crew), Jacques Demy's Lola isn't exactly the masterpiece critics claimed back in 1960, but it is one of the more likable films of the French New Wave, largely because it's less concerned with scoring stylistic points and more interested in people. What's particularly refreshing is that Demy likes these people - all of them, without exception - and never judges them, and that generosity of spirit carries it a long way. Following the role coincidence plays in our lives through its characters whose paths and hearts cross, it staves off complete schmaltz with an awareness that one person's happy ending is often another's missed possibility of happiness: Demy may not be able to resist giving one character a Hollywood Happy Ending, but it does come at a price to another, while other characters lives are left unresolved. There are a few moments where Anouk Aimee's tart with a heart overdoes the Marilyn impersonations (an affectation of the character rather than the actress) and Allan Scott's English dialogue sounds like it's been dubbed by a German reading phonetically, but they're fairly fleeting irritants and there's more than enough elsewhere to make up for it, not least Raoul Coutard's lovingly shot black and white Scope photography of Nantes.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Lola takes it time to get there, but when it breaks through it has an excellent story to tell. In a rather La Ronde fashion the film concerns lost loves, missed loves and mistaken loves. Roland loves Lola who loves Michel, but Michel has gone to seek his fortune, and she is a "dancer" (nudge nudge wink wink) loved by Franky, who meets Cecile, the young daughter of Madame Desnoyers, who is herself interested in Roland. For the first half I felt the leads needed a good slapping, but it all ended rather well. The heart really is a lonely hunter.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 December 2013
To me this movie captures the essence of keeping love alive through difficult times when the loved one is not there. It's also a snapshot of the new post Second World War morality in Europe. However for me it also has a timeless quality: update the clothes, mannerisms and language and it could just as well be set in the present day. I like all the varied short vignettes with which the director gives you snapshots into the lives of several different characters, while also telling a strong story through the main protagonists. It feels pretty short - well it is a Nouvelle Vague! Modern viewers are used to longer films. Anouk Aimee looks stunning although I had expected more "burlesque" /glamorous costumes. But there again, that may just be 21st century perspective. She dances and sings a charming number " C'est moi, C'est Lola." Yet her life is so sad. Eventually she is redeemed, but you would have to watch the movie to find out how! Next up I am going to watch "Un Homme et Un Femme" in the Jacques Demy series. Another interesting meditation on love. I definitely recommend this film as part of an exploration of the work of Jacques Demy. Enjoy!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 March 2007
This is a brilliant French New Wave film, but the much underappreciated director Jacques Demy. I would recommend this film to anybody in an instant. It tells the story of a dancer called Lola who is waiting for the return of her true love. Whilst waiting she has a son by the man who left her (her true love) and affairs with American Sailers. The film, though called Lola, tells about 4 different stories that intertwine and are connected by meetings, circumstances and friends. This, however, does not make the plot convoluted. It is still very accessable. It is perhaps my favourite New Wave film. It is referrenced a lot in Jacques Demy's later film Umbrellas of Cherbourg - the music, the character names, the town, etc. It truly is a classic and a generally forgotten gem. Please watch!! This film has English subtitles in yellow for clarity. 10/10
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 May 2012
A joyous, breath-taking, consummate, masterpiece. In the cinema, on a film-print, even more so. Even here, astounding. Demy: a one-man movement for beauty in the world.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)