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on 31 July 2016
I have been a professional trader working in investment banking for 20 years. This a great book to learn all the tools and fundamentals you need to trade successfully. Read this book well, apply it and learn to trade from solid foundations.
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on 27 August 2013
A meat-and-potatoes beginners' guide to commodities, competently written but perhaps a bit out of date now, given the trouble China and India are in.
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on 25 March 2013
Good basic information to get you started with a base introduction. I would recommend reading this book before going on to anything else.
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on 28 April 2011
Just what I needed. It gave a good general overview of the main commodities. In each case, there was a chart, a brief description, history and outlook. This is idea for an investor (not trader) like me who needed that general guidance.
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on 1 October 2010
There are all sorts of reasons for wanting to invest in commodities - providing a hedge against inflation, for instance, and for portfolio diversification - but Philip Scott's useful book points to one over-riding attribute: in a world with finite resources and rising populations, the need for commodities is obvious. Industrial and precious metals, alongside agricultural products such as soybeans and wheat, are currently `the lifeblood of planet earth, helping to build, power and feed the globe'. Oil and gas are another two crucial commodities.

Now, all this would be fairly academic where it not for another factor which has transformed access to commodities markets for the average investor: the rise of the exchange-traded fund. "With these new instruments, adding wheat to an investment portfolio is as simple as adding Vodaphone", says Scott.

But even though it might be easy, investing in commodities is also fairly high risk, so limiting your exposure to around 5-10% of your portfolio is advisable, he says.

Each chapter looks at a particular commodity in depth, analysing past performance, current demand, supply issues, and the investment outlook. There's also a comprehensive section listing all the available commodity ETFs on the London Stock Exchange.

As a guide for beginners, this book can't be faulted.
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on 31 October 2015
Fine, decent background info, nothing more. Will provide a small background on a variety of different commodities. Does what it says.
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on 17 January 2013
Not so in depth in to any particular commodity. More a general book that gives a taster in to the world of corporate finance.
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on 20 December 2013
Good guide to get the basic understanding of this stream of investment...I'll keep it close for reference and that's a fact!
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on 4 February 2013
The full, laborious title is: The Commodities Investor: A beginner's guide to diversifying your portfolio with commodities: A Practical Guide to Making Money from the Commodities Supercycle.

That pain aside, Philip Scott has made a comprehensive and easy to read summary of the commodity investor's marketplace. Every commodity spent the last decade outperforming the FTSE100, but was even more volatile. The fundamental investment case is still there: the world's population is growing, and it's becoming more wealthy (particularly the BRICs), buying and using more and more of the basic commodities - energy, metals and grains. Any investment you make will be affected by commodity prices, whether or not you invest directly in them.

Scott breaks each commodity down into performance, demand factors, supply factors, overall outlook and how to buy (ETFs, funds, or direct investments). If you're a share investor, you may not want to endure the volatility of commodity prices, but the book is well worth a review and some notes, because input costs are going to continue to affect not just mining and energy shares, but the market as a whole as we move ahead in this decade.

Great book - I really rate the readability of it.
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on 20 April 2010
A concise and tightly written resource. One of the best of its kind I have come across in this space.
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