Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's



TOP 100 REVIEWERon 8 August 2016
As commented by other reviewers writing here, Anna Whitelock's debut book is not a revisionist biography, nor is it an exhaustively in-depth analysis of Mary Tudor and, as far as I am aware, there are no significant new revelations made by the author about her subject; however, this attractively presented and well-researched book is a competent and very accessible account of the life and reign of the first woman to be crowned Queen of England. Many of us reading this book will already be aware that due to her insecure position as the daughter of Henry VIII's discarded first wife, Katherine of Aragon, and her staunch Roman Catholicism, Mary Tudor's accession to the throne of England was somewhat against the odds and, once she was actually on the throne, her reign was a particularly difficult one - both politically and personally. Anna Whitelock explains just how traumatic Mary Tudor's life was, and she comments that the contrast between Mary as Queen and the personal tragedy of Mary as a woman, is the key to understanding her life and reign; she sums up her subject's life by stating that: "[Mary's] private traumas of phantom pregnancies, debilitating illnesses, and rejection - first by her father and then by her husband - were played out in the public glare of the fickle Tudor court. The woman who emerges is a complex figure of immense courage and resolve…" and Ms Whitelock carefully leads the reader through the events of Mary Tudor's life making this a sympathetic, faithfully rendered and very accessible account.
11 Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 30 October 2017
Its a very engrossing read that goes into an appropriate amount of detail although it does appear to have an agenda of portraying Mary as a woman who was an underestimated victim and overcome all odds and exceeded expectations to a degree that it comes across as far too subjective at times. Besides that, i'd highly recomend this book to anybody who wants to learn about Mary's life and reign as it gives a nice even spread of both.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 18 February 2017
took ages to arrive and writing in book is really small, i haven't gotten round to reading as size of writing print has put me off.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 27 September 2017
A brilliant book
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 12 March 2016
Full of facts, little hard reading but interesting
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 12 August 2009
If you have had limited exposure to the Tudor era, this is a nice introduction to the life and reign of Mary I. It provides an accessible overview without being difficult to follow.

Those with a good grounding in Tudor era history, however, will probably find nothing new in this book. I also found that the short chapters - so thoroughly praised by other reviewers - limit the amount of information that can be imparted about the subject at hand. Thus, one has the feeling that one is merely browsing Mary's life without going into it in much depth.

In short, this is a good book for one who is just discovering Mary Tudor. Those in search of a more in depth examination should look elsewhere.
0Comment| 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 6 May 2012
This is a straight forward chronological account of the life of Mary, the daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon. It is an easy read, with short chapters and a fast pace, and gives a balanced account of Mary's life, both before and after her coronation as Mary 1. It is a good introduction to the subject.

I would have liked more information about her reign, with more description and analysis of the effects of her policies - this book is about evenly split between the description of her life before coronation, when she was steadfast and brave in upholding her loyalty to her mother and to her faith, and her more controversial rule thereafter. Given that controversy I would have like more information and context to form my own opinion.

However, I did enjoy the book and will now look elsewhere for a more detailed analysis
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 25 June 2017
More like reading history book than reading a novel
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 31 January 2012
Although she was England's first Queen and the eldest daughter of Hanry VIII she is very much forgotten. This book is beautifully researched and written. It shows Mary in her true light. Proving that she is indeeed the daughter of Henry VIII. The treatment of her by her father is most evident in the way she later treated her subjects. It is a shame that she is forgotten so badly despite what she did. Why should she seem to be cast into the shadow of her little half sister Elizabeth? This book tries to answer a lot of questions and makes you see Mary in a completely humanising light.
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
VINE VOICEon 29 May 2009
Mary Tudor seems to be eternally eclipsed by her half-sister Queen Elizabeth and her overpowering father Henry VIII. She seems to be rather her mother's daughter and the King's of Spain wife and above all the religious fanatic who burned Protestants at the stake and went down in history as "Bloody Mary".

Well, of course there is always an element of truth in it. But there is so much more to England's first ruling Queen. And this is already the first point of notice: she was the first female sovereign. Taking into account her father's desperate attempts to avoid a female succession and the general concepts of females at the time, it is remarkable.

Anna Whitelock presents a very well written and very readable biography of Queen Mary I. The short chapters help a lot. It is a faithful account of her life and reign. It is a great start if one wants to explore Mary's life. But it is not - like Linda Porter's excellent biography - a book which gives the reader a deep understanding of Mary and how she "ticked". One gets glimpses of it. No doubt, it is a good and very easy to read book, but it misses a whole dimension. So as a start it is perfect, but I am afraid here it ends.
11 Comment| 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)