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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 19 October 2017
I read the series of Courtney, Ballantine and others as a teenager onwards from the early 70's.

The tales are entertaining and informative about the lives and times of the early explorers and exploiters of those wild areas of the world which even today are wild and untamed.

Following the rise, fall, success, heroics and so much more of a generation of exceptional figures.

Although fiction, the storyline is woven into real life events with real life figures.

Extraordinary men and women in dangerous activities ranging from shooting elephants for ivory to the discovery of gold, diamonds and agricultural lands.

This book floats into World War One with a new generation being added into the storyline and providing extended family to in turn provide the characters for future takes

The books written by WS are just as entertaining today as when I was a boy. ( Not the co written books, they are awful)

Well worth reading
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VINE VOICEon 20 October 2014
The 5 books, The Burning Shore (1985), Power of the Sword (1986), Rage (1987), A Time To Die (1989) and Golden Fox (1990) form the second series of the Courtney's in Africa. and are intended to be read in that order.

In this book, Power of the Sword, we meet some of the new characters in Shasa Courtney and Manfred De La Rey who are bitter enemies but also unknowingly half brothers. However the lives of Shasa and Manfred are closely entwined as they both rise up into positions of great influence. Shasa into high society and Manfred into the Nazis. Both even going to the Berlin Olympics to represent South Africa.

It is all intriguing stuff if a fair bit contrived. Will Manfred succeed in his mission to assassinate the SA prime minister. And what about Moses Gamma waiting in the wings to outdo Nelson Mandela while seducing all in his path no matter the age, sex or anything else.

The whole series to date have been some of my favourite books despite them also being a bit cheesy.
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on 5 October 2017
Reading all of the Courtneys for the second time. Last read them years ago. A good read. Love the writing style of Wilbur Smith. His story telling pulls you in and keeps you interested. Not tempted to skip like I do with some other authors. His story set in South Africa gives you an insight into the history of the country. He obviously loves the country and makes you fall in love with it too...
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on 29 September 2014
First class read once again from the writer of the Courtney series with explosive action from the word go. Using the background of African politics, South Africa in particular we follow the course of the next generation of the family as they take the measure of each other to the final conclusion in Rage (the next book in the series).

Mr Smith certainly has the ability to write such books that you feel you are actually there, the sights, smells, the colourful people and the all round drama of the times you can just experience them page by page. As stated previously in the books I have read to date in this series, I lived in South Africa for 35 years and can appreciate the extent that Mr Smith has gone to in his research which has enabled him to write books of such quality.

I can never tire of these books and they come high recommended by myself. Don't be put off by the length of the book, it is a worthwhile book to read.

Thank you Wilbur.
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on 1 September 2015
A wonderful gripping story of a family as they grow and react to the World about them as it passes through key passages of world history. From the after effects of the Great War to the years immediately after World War II. Wilbur Smith cleverly manages to weave real events and people together with his characters and storyline. Helps if you have read the preceding story (Burning Shore) but not imperative. Smith shows his love of Africa and the depth of his knowledge of it's history and struggles of it's people.
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on 20 May 2016
I bought this book, along with The Burning Shore, as presents for friend visiting this country. He appeared very pleased to receive them but won't have a chance to read them here as he'll have not much time.
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on 1 July 2015
I've not finished this book yet but I'm thoroughly enjoying it. The characters are well drawn and believable. Wilbur Smith is a very graphic writer. You can really picture the scenery he describes, and the moods and conditions of the people he writes about.
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on 8 September 2016
Powerfully written Smith captures, as ever, the landscape and setting of the lands of Africa and Germany (Berlin games) to remarkable precision.

Strong characters and familiar historical points leads the reader to the depths of the finery of the English language while letting imagination paint the scenes. As living in the 21st Century we know how historical events play out but Smith provides deeper insight while being true to the account.
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on 16 February 2015
Another very good novel from Wilbur Smith, giving a very good and graphic account of Africa leading up to the second Word war an the political struggles in the country. It is well woven into the stories of the Courtneys.
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on 17 February 2015
Another Wilbur Smith triumph. An epic story, a thoroughly enjoyable read and fast moving. A long narrative but never boring, this book keeps the reader enthralled to the very end.
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