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4.1 out of 5 stars
112
4.1 out of 5 stars
The Lost Army
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£4.27


on 26 September 2006
It is always an exciting time for me when I find a new author who writes about the subjects I am interested in. This is Paul Sussman's first novel and he certainly seems to have the magical gift of storytelling. The book is based around a well documented event in early history. In 523 BC the Persian Emperor Cambyses sent an army across Egypt's desert to destroy an oracle at Amun. Somewhere in the deserts the army of 50,000 men were destroyed by a sandstorm. The book is set in modern times and there is much murder and mystery involved. Inspector Yusuf Khalifa of the Luxor police is brought in to solve the crimes, but even he is amazed by the sting in the tail that this book has in store for the reader. This really is a gripping book, one of the best I have read this year, and I commend it to you.
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VINE VOICEon 22 April 2007
In 525 BC the Persian emperor Cambyses II invaded Egypt and successfully overthrew the native Egyptian pharaoh, Psamtek III, last ruler of Egypt's 26th Dynasty to become the first ruler of Egypt's 27th Persian Dynasty. Cambyses II sent his army to Siwa Oasis in the Western Desert to seek (or seize) legitimization of his rule from the oracle of Amun, much as Alexander the Great would do in the 4th century BC. However, the army was overtaken by a sandstorm and buried.

For centuries adventurers and archaeologists have tried to find the lost army, and at times, tantalizing, though usually false glues have been discovered. Within recent years all manner of artifacts and monuments have been discovered in Egypt's Western Desert. Here and there, new discoveries of temples and tombs turn up, even in relatively inhabited areas where more modern structures are often difficult to distinguish from ancient ruins. Very recently, when a geological team from the Helwan University geologists found themselves walking through dunes littered with fragments of textiles, daggers, arrow-heads, and the bleached bones of the men to whom all these trappings belonged.

So far so good the reality which forms the background of this amazing crime story which will hold you from page one and only lets you go with the very last page. It is a page turner where fact and fiction merge into a one. Paul Sussmann knows how to hold the reader's interest, develops the personalities and the story in a convincing and interesting way. The various leads merge at some point, the twist are not outrages in the sense that one asks oneself "Where the hell is this coming from".

There are some aspects one needs to think about: terrorism, its roots and its effects.

All in all a book I highly enjoyed and can equally recommended.
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on 16 March 2015
An unusual approach to a different telling of 'The Ten Thousand' which has cropped up in various guises. I enjoyed the different perspective this brought and the romance added, rather than detracted, from the story. Good, strong, characters and a very well developed plot line. I almost got frostbite reading some sections! Very well worth reading.
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on 5 June 2017
Great book part of a series
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on 19 January 2013
If you love Paul Sussman, you'll love this story. Very sorry to learn of his death and have read all of his marvellous books, This author will be sadly missed.
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on 27 November 2012
This book was a little slow to start with but picked up well. It was not hard to work things out so could have had a few more twists. The inspector was a good caricature.
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on 3 May 2013
A little more dated than I expected in terms of age of the book and the pages but acceptable and it's a book at the end of the day .
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on 4 October 2016
Fabulously engrossing.
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on 19 August 2007
This is the first book i have read by this author and I can honestly say that I enjoyed it. He has a number of twists that you don't see coming, well I didn't for one of them, which makes the book worth the effort.

I enjoyed the idea of a muslim hero rather than the usual all muslim's bad all christians good sort of thing.

Give it a punt chances are you will not be disapointed.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 15 November 2004
It is always an exciting time for me when I find a new author who writes about the subjects I am interested in. This is Paul Sussman's first novel and he certainly seems to have the magical gift of storytelling. The book is based around a well documented event in early history. In 523 BC the Persian Emperor Cambyses sent an army across Egypt's desert to destroy an oracle at Amun. Somewhere in the deserts the army of 50,000 men were destroyed by a sandstorm. The book is set in modern times and there is much murder and mystery involved. Inspector Yusuf Khalifa of the Luxor police is brought in to solve the crimes, but even he is amazed by the sting in the tail that this book has in store for the reader. This really is a gripping book, one of the best I have read this year, and I commend it to you.
0Comment| 49 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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