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3.8 out of 5 stars
166
3.8 out of 5 stars
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Price:£3.99


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on 25 May 2006
The theme of pretentiousness is still relevant today, although Jim's misdemeanours seem very mild by comparison with contemporary mores. There are some sad moments, but on the whole this is a very funny book. It has to be approached as a period piece rather than cutting edge satire, but people still do things to please the boss.
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on 29 December 2013
I re-read this every few years, simply because it is the funniest book I've ever read. If you need a good laugh, then definitely give this a try. The old-fashioned dialogue and some of the ideas take a little bit of getting used to, but not too much as you soon recognise all these characters. You probably know people like all of them in your own life. One word of advice: make sure that you make Jim's faces as he makes them, as they are described ....as it is part of the joy of this book.
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on 9 August 2014
Great classic novel which has stood he test of time! Hilarious read.
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on 8 December 2013
A campus novel...
Did not know what to expect of it, not my type of book I would read without being recommended in the top 100 greatest books of all time.
I was positively surprised, started a bit slow but after some time I started to like it more and more, you really sympathize with Jim, he is really funny and you really want it to end happily for him.
If it does, you have to find out for yourself...
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on 15 December 2015
great book. haven't read it for years enjoyed it all agin
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on 21 December 2013
Kingsley Amis 's Lucky Jim has stood the test of time. The hangover scene is still one of funniest in contemporary literature whilst the main character is as self absorbed and droll as I fondly remembered. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes acid wit and an eye for the absurd.
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on 7 January 2009
As a fan of Martin Amis, I sought this out as something of a curiosity. Humour is clearly an Amis family trait, but Kingsley's work is lighter (more accessible) than his son's. Lucky Jim is unashamedly sit-com in style, with Jim - the harmless, mostly-well-intentioned fool - stumbling from one faux pas to the next. And, of course, every ill-conceived attempt to rectify one awful scenario only precipitates another - more awful than the last. It is classic comedy. In other words: very funny, but rather dated. I wouldn't buy another Kingsley, but I would definitely rescue one from a dusty guest-bedroom shelf.
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on 21 September 2016
A classic, with an informative preface.
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My mother gave me this book to read while I was still at school in the 1970s... I can't say it had a very good influence, as it imbued me with a hearty disrespect for people who take themselves too seriously!

At the time it came out, it was truly an anarchic book, poking fun at a particular kind of middle-class, pseudo-intellectualism which was prevalent at the time in red-brick universities. The eponymous hero, Jim Dixon, is a Northern boy with a working-class background, struggling to establish himself as a history lecturer. His desperate antics, while trying to fit in with people who are essentially unlike him, are wildly funny.

Reading it again after a gap of forty-something years was a remembrance of my own youth. I found the book even funnier now than I did then. The sort of people Amis pokes fun at haven't gone away. I don't think they ever do go away -- they simply change their pretensions and fads, but their essential smugness and lampoon-worthiness remain the same. Kingsley Amis prided himself on being politically incorrect, and this stance led him, in later novels, to be somewhat repetitious, and eventually to grow perilously close to the sort of persons he mocked in "Lucky Jim."

This explosion of mocking laughter is an original testament of youth, and I am sure it will never grow old, as the rest of us do. Should be amusing at least a few more generations to come.

Highly recommended.
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on 21 May 2013
Cheap to buy and delivered efficiently. I read the book quite quickly. Did not like it much. No sympatheitic character. Jim is one of the first of the 'anti-heroes' of the 1950s novels.
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