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on 13 October 2017
One of the best series I'ven seen, utterly brilliant.

The only shame is not having subtitles, but even so, it's a must buy.
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on 18 January 2018
Terrific. Will watch this many times
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on 16 January 2018
outstanding television
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on 27 February 2014
I am a Powell nut; I re-read the books every couple of years, because I am a writer, and Powell my master. I re-read the sequence everytime I am embarking on a new book, or if, as at present, I get stuck. Having just finished the books (again), I thought I'd try this DVD. I remember watching the series when it was broadcast, and on watching it again, my opinion is unchanged; it doesn't make much sense if you haven't read the books. But if you have, there are real treats; Geilgiud as St John Clarke, Alan Bennett as Sillery, Michael Williams playing Ted Jeavons to a T, Miranda Richardson as a rather brilliant Pamela; and of course, Simon Russel Beale's monstrous Widmerpool. Most of the dialogue is lifted from the books, so it can be laugh aloud funny. But there is no time for characterisation, many of the characters have been cut (Barnby, Frederica and Dicky Umfraville etc), and some characters appear on screen for such a short period of time that it is impossible to care; Robert Tolland's death, for example, or Maclintick's suicide, both would have made me shrug my shoulders if I hadn't known who the characters were. But I must say my eyes moistened at the deaths of Lady Molly and Moreland. But that was because I cared for them as characters in the book. So, read the books, and then watch this in the realisation that they are really unfilmable, and that this is the closest anyone will get.
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on 10 August 2017
Almost a phenomenon - the interpretation of the various characters takes one into another world with almost enough authenticity to forget the fictional side of the story if there is a story. The fashion, the decor, the left and right attitudes, the tension, the good and bad habits are all presented in a painfully honest manner. They all produce the fascination where the, yes, impressive and sophisticated and ever entertaining production triumphs.
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on 4 May 2017
This is one of those rare productions that come along once in a while.Very nearly faultless. While there is no denying that, along with the books, the story does lose its way rather towards the end, it's so easy to forgive all when taken as a whole. There are some wonderful performances, particularly from the characters when young and, just to be truly shallow, it's got Jonathon Cake, so well worth watching for that alone.
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on 6 October 2011
To cram 12 novels into about seven hours of TV can't be done, as it gives each novel just over half an hour. That said, much of the novel consists of Jenkins' musings on life, relationships and the rest, so has been entirely cut - unlike in Brideshead (1981) there is no narrative here. What we do have is the action seen on stage, such as the killings of two characters in WW2, the assault on Widmerpool at the concert near the end, etc., rather than these events being related to Jenkins after the event. Episodes have been cut out - such as Jenkins' spell as company officer in the war or his stay at the guest house in France, and many characters are cut out (eg Barnaby) or included only sparingly (eg General Conyers or Jimmy Brent). The replacement of Purefoy by an older actor in the last phase is a let down and it took me a while to realsie this was Jenkins - all the other actors were aged. Widmerpool is splendid.

Those who have not read the brilliant books may find themselves rather lost as characters come and go frequently, but it is an entertaining ramble through the highlights of the books. There are some fine actors, good settings and appropriate music. I feel it catches the essence of the books, even though the detail has had to be sacrificed to meet the time constraints imposed by the medium. Not the best there could be, but very good.
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on 26 August 2017
Anthony Powell's "A Dance to the Music and Time" is one off my favorite novels. This TV adaptation is simply glorious !
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on 20 February 2015
Excellent film
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on 14 January 2008
Having read the books, I wondered how on earth they would manage to do them justice on the television. I have to say, I thought the acting was absolutely first-rate, without a shadow of a doubt: I can't think of any weak characters, and some of them were simply outstanding: Charles Stringham descending into alcoholism and reborn, but completely destroyed in the process; Widmerpool, played, I think, by the same actor all the way through the series, and always more or less ridiculous; Pamela Widmerpool, played by Miranda Richardson, having some marvelous lines as she turns one male head after another; and then gentle Nick Jenkins, who appears to be the only sane person in the whole mad world.
There's lots in the books that couldn't possibly find their way onto the TV, but it was splendid to see so much of it brought to life. I found it a very enjoyable 6 or 7 hours viewing. Highly recommended for any Powell aficionado, or anyone looking for something a bit out of the way.
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