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on 30 September 2014
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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 24 October 2015
In earlier Doctor Who stories, the Autons, and the Nestene Consciousness, have always exuded an aura of horror - how do you stop beings made of what appears to be plastic, and how do you stop a totally amoral conscious being who wants nothing other than control and your destruction? But the Doctor has always managed to halt their advances.

Now, the Tenth Doctor finds himself in a futuristic shopping mall complex - where an entire life experience is promised, not just shopping - and there appears to be an Auton presence. That much is fairly obvious, both from the cover of the book, and from the action pretty much right from the start. But does that same sense of awe and horror still pervade the story? Well ... no, not really. One dimensional characters, rather silly plotting, and the Doctor being more manic than usual do not a good story make. Pity, really - the Autons offer promise in their entire premise, but this book just does not live up to that premise.
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on 27 April 2016
Although it does it reasonably well, more or less this is what you would probably expect from a novel featuring Autons. Essentially this is because although they are a great concept for one story they don’t really have a great deal of scope as re-occurring monsters other than providing novelty ways to kill people involving plastic. The three onscreen stories that are about them (ie not ‘The Pandorica Opens’) all have fairly similar plot elements and ‘Autonomy’ is no different.
This does mean, however, that ‘Autonomy’ plays to the Auton’s strengths. Setting the story within an immense, semi-futuristic shopping centre/mall easily taps into the iconic images of plastic dummies smashing through department store windows. Trapping shoppers inside Hyperville also allows for a bit of a ‘base under siege’ scenario.Having the centre include hotels, spas and theme parks also provides the circumstances for a multitude of semi-amusing, plastic related deaths. Various Autons relentlessly pursuing victims through theme parks is also reminiscent of the film ‘Westworld’, which I’m sure was an inspiration for this novel.
There’s a reasonable range of people from different backgrounds, professions and ages; some of which are merely cannon fodder, bit others are there to make the reader wonder who might actually be an Auton. Guessing who is, however, isn’t that difficult.
As this is one of the Tenth Doctor novels where he has no companion travelling with him he ends up with assistance from a bit of an entourage that includes journalists, children and a popstar; all of which prove quite capable. Despite the jeopardous circumstances they all face it somehow makes for quite a light hearted romp as they are chased by plastic manikins, vampires, witches and devilish children. It gives the book a fun atmosphere.
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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 3 March 2015
In earlier Doctor Who stories, the Autons, and the Nestene Consciousness, have always exuded an aura of horror - how do you stop beings made of what appears to be plastic, and how do you stop a totally amoral conscious being who wants nothing other than control and your destruction? But the Doctor has always managed to halt their advances.

Now, the Tenth Doctor finds himself in a futuristic shopping mall complex - where an entire life experience is promised, not just shopping - and there appears to be an Auton presence. That much is fairly obvious, both from the cover of the book, and from the action pretty much right from the start. But does that same sense of awe and horror still pervade the story? Well ... no, not really. One dimensional characters, rather silly plotting, and the Doctor being more manic than usual do not a good story make. Pity, really - the Autons offer promise in their entire premise, but this book just does not live up to that premise.
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on 12 October 2017
AMAZING I'm so glad I chose this book!!!!
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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 7 January 2012
In earlier Doctor Who stories, the Autons, and the Nestene Consciousness, have always exuded an aura of horror - how do you stop beings made of what appears to be plastic, and how do you stop a totally amoral conscious being who wants nothing other than control and your destruction? But the Doctor has always managed to halt their advances.

Now, the Tenth Doctor finds himself in a futuristic shopping mall complex - where an entire life experience is promised, not just shopping - and there appears to be an Auton presence. That much is fairly obvious, both from the cover of the book, and from the action pretty much right from the start. But does that same sense of awe and horror still pervade the story? Well ... no, not really. One dimensional characters, rather silly plotting, and the Doctor being more manic than usual do not a good story make. Pity, really - the Autons offer promise in their entire premise, but this book just does not live up to that premise.
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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 26 September 2014
In earlier Doctor Who stories, the Autons, and the Nestene Consciousness, have always exuded an aura of horror - how do you stop beings made of what appears to be plastic, and how do you stop a totally amoral conscious being who wants nothing other than control and your destruction? But the Doctor has always managed to halt their advances.

Now, the Tenth Doctor finds himself in a futuristic shopping mall complex - where an entire life experience is promised, not just shopping - and there appears to be an Auton presence. That much is fairly obvious, both from the cover of the book, and from the action pretty much right from the start. But does that same sense of awe and horror still pervade the story? Well ... no, not really. One dimensional characters, rather silly plotting, and the Doctor being more manic than usual do not a good story make. Pity, really - the Autons offer promise in their entire premise, but this book just does not live up to that premise.
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on 27 April 2016
Although it does it reasonably well, more or less this is what you would probably expect from a novel featuring Autons. Essentially this is because although they are a great concept for one story they don’t really have a great deal of scope as re-occurring monsters other than providing novelty ways to kill people involving plastic. The three onscreen stories that are about them (ie not ‘The Pandorica Opens’) all have fairly similar plot elements and ‘Autonomy’ is no different.
This does mean, however, that ‘Autonomy’ plays to the Auton’s strengths. Setting the story within an immense, semi-futuristic shopping centre/mall easily taps into the iconic images of plastic dummies smashing through department store windows. Trapping shoppers inside Hyperville also allows for a bit of a ‘base under siege’ scenario.Having the centre include hotels, spas and theme parks also provides the circumstances for a multitude of semi-amusing, plastic related deaths. Various Autons relentlessly pursuing victims through theme parks is also reminiscent of the film ‘Westworld’, which I’m sure was an inspiration for this novel.
There’s a reasonable range of people from different backgrounds, professions and ages; some of which are merely cannon fodder, bit others are there to make the reader wonder who might actually be an Auton. Guessing who is, however, isn’t that difficult.
As this is one of the Tenth Doctor novels where he has no companion travelling with him he ends up with assistance from a bit of an entourage that includes journalists, children and a popstar; all of which prove quite capable. Despite the jeopardous circumstances they all face it somehow makes for quite a light hearted romp as they are chased by plastic manikins, vampires, witches and devilish children. It gives the book a fun atmosphere.
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on 13 April 2014
A little slow to really get going but it did contain enough twists and character development to keep my son entertained throughout. Without giving any secrets away the evolutionary aspects of the Autons was novel and definitely enhanced the story. Some interesting story development was also in evidence. Overall this was a very interesting read.
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VINE VOICEon 26 August 2011
Set in the near future, Hyperville is the mother and father of all shopping malls, an experience so vast with restaurants, bars, casinos, cinemas and theme parks that its hotels hold the shoppers who come to stay for a week or more to get the entire experience. But something terrible is lurking under the very lowest level of the complex and the Doctor once again fights the Nestene Consciousness, a contest we have seen many times before as the consciouness takes over plastic and taps into our fear of shop dummies. Good fun and thought provoking about the seeming human love for shopping malls, which are my personal idea of hell.
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