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VINE VOICEon 29 September 2014
Clear exposition of difficult ideas. I'd be lying if I said it was an easy read. Feynman eschews analogies (e.g., paired electrons are nothing like two ping pong balls on a spring) as being ultimately unhelpful.

It probably should form part of the A level Physics background syllabus because if your are seriously considering taking the subject further you need to understand this material.
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on 1 April 2017
I wish I'd read this book before doing my science degree, Feynman presents a clear and extremely useful perspective on the relation between maths and science. Equations are difficult to read though.
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on 18 February 2016
Great book. You can hear Feynman's voice in your head as you read, which is a pleasure in itself.
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on 29 May 2015
But equations are virtually unreadable in the kindle format.
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on 20 March 2015
Physics as seen by one of the 20th century greatest physicists - brilliant
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on 23 August 2013
I recommend reading this and watching the lectures too. The written text is great for picking up the exact detail but the delivery is better heard from Feynman himself.
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on 2 October 2010
Fascinating book by a highly significant author. Delivered in good condition in a timely fashion.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 24 October 2015
This was a late discovery for me amongst Richard Feynman's books, and it's something of an oddity. Like all the books with his name on, this wasn't a case of Feynman sitting down to write a book; he never wrote a single book - in this case it's a transcription of a set of lectures Feynman gave at Cornell University which were broadcast in the UK by the BBC.

What the great physicist sets out to do is to explore the nature of physical laws. Where this works best (and he would probably have hated this suggestion) is where he was at his most philosophical. In the first lecture he explored just what was meant by physical laws and this is genuinely interesting stuff, especially as it's something we rarely give much thought to.

After that he goes on to cover specific areas, with lectures on gravity, maths, conservation, symmetry, the arrow of time and probability, before pulling things together in a final lecture on the search for new laws. For me these chapters don't work quite as well in book form, partly because we miss the visual aspects of Feynman's talks, and partly because they are perhaps a little too summary for the topics covered. The other slight problem with specifics is that inevitably some of the content (from the 1960s) is quite dated - particularly in the 'new laws' section, where he covers particle physics at a point before quarks and when the particle zoo seemed out of control. It's interesting from a historical perspective of what the understanding was like at the time, but it's not an ideal way to find out about particle physics.

Overall, an essential if you want to have a complete picture of Feynman's output, and fascinating in that opening chapter, but not the best of the Feynman books.
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on 15 February 2014
written in an easy style but explaining correctly not with silly analogies. Easy (ish) for a scientist and do'able for most others. I will be buying other books.
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on 22 March 2013
A readable book about something largely incomprehensibly understood. If you want more brain cells, read the book. Read it again to keep the same cells alive.
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