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on 2 October 2017
Very good condition for a penny and an interesting read. Typical Ballard observation of modern society framing a who dunnit
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on 23 May 2016
Anyone familiar with Ballard will expect to read about a social commentary whim taken to the hypothetical extreme and this lives up to the expectation. I enjoyed reading it. Although not in my top 5 Ballard books this still warrants investigation.
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on 15 February 2015
Not up to J G Ballard's usual standard. We know he was ill while he was writing it
and it all got very muddled and the story didn't go anywhere. Lots of repetition.
A few interesting ideas on consumerism.
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on 19 April 2016
Great read.
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on 2 December 2015
Not one of Ballard's best but I feel deserves better than the 2.5 star on Amazon. I love all of Ballard's books.
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on 17 May 2013
I don't disagree with the many low raters pronouncements that 'its no cocaine nights or super-cannes' -- yeah ok it isn't... but its got its own intangible, occult, uber-surrey edge to it. I loved it.

For me this is a very fitting final Ballard.

He takes the home counties dark heart out of the chest and holds it up to the face - he gives us one last good look at how contaminated with necrotic decay we are before expiring. He is a hero and a prophet. RIP
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on 28 June 2013
I can understand many of the comments here, especially having just finished Super-Cannes, which is written much more skillfully. However, Kingdom Come is still a book of compelling ideas that speculates and extrapolates about where the trends of consumer culture will lead us.
If you are a fan of Ballard, it's well worth reading. The recurring ideas of his late fiction are here, and the text is eerily relevant, especially given the Turkey protests and the supermarket-construction that instigated them.
As for the negative comments about the plot, construction and style - they are not unfounded. Some of the ideas are brought forward in an irritating fashion at times, where Ballard "tells", rather than "shows" his more philosophical points, lacking some of the craft he has shown previously. I'm not so easily swayed by the "bad plot" arguments, I don't think the novel intends to present you with a dazzling plot, rather it seeks to depict societal, psychological and cultural conditions and raise some questions about the present and future (a personal past & nightmarish history is also haunting Pearson's present).
All in all, not Ballard's best, but still a thought-provoking addition to his late fictions.
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on 25 September 2013
I cannot stop thinking about this book when reading about the four day siege of Nairobi's Westgate centre in the paper today. With its horrific mash-up of consumerism and violence Ballard, as usual, got it right.
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on 24 February 2015
He is a great author and although the book was written well, I found Ballard's dystopian view of our world too depressing - not that I don't agree with a lot of what he says. If you want some honest writing about what society is doing to itself then this is for you.
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VINE VOICEon 18 July 2013
I find this book quite hard to review. There are important messages here about how people suffering from a sense of ennui can resort to violence and mayhem as a substitute for more meaningful activity in their lives; and how propaganda can sway large numbers of people. However, I found the scenario of people fighting and dying to defend their Metro- shopping centre and even worshipping it as a deity to be too unrealistic at a level other than as pure satire (and in any case they have the said centre and wall to wall sporting activities to distract them from their Weltschmerz). The actual plot involving the killing of the narrator's father, intertwined with the future of the centre and the struggle between its supporters and detractors, was very convoluted and I often lost track of who was on which side, including the narrator himself, and perhaps more tellingly I found I didn't really care. In sum then, while based on a very similar idea to several other Ballard novels, this lacked the punch of High Rise or Cocaine Nights/Super-Cannes (the latter two of which are very similar indeed).
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