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4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 27 December 2013
I bought this book along with the Fellowship of the Ring and Return of the King Special Editions. The pattern on the spines of the three books match up to form an image of the White Tree of Gondor - it certainly looks good on the bookshelf!

This book is presented in a purple/red coloured cloth bound hardcover that looks both attractive and durable. Inside, the first thing you come across is a beautiful map of Middle Earth in black and white (and red) before the story continues. I won't say anything about the story itself as we all know about it and there are in depth reviews floating around on the web (both critical and applauding!). This review is for this particular edition of the book, and I think it is fantastic.

It's worth noting that this "special edition" is available as part of a box set with the other two books in the trilogy, along with a version of the Hobbit.
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First published in 1954 TheTwo Towers is the second part of the epic saga, and Tolkien's masterpiece, The Lord Of The Rings. It has been a firm favourite of mine since I first read it over 25 years ago, and every time I return to the trilogy I find something new in this multilayered and deep piece of literature. I have worked my through it again recently, and with much temerity have decided to post a review of this stand out classic of classics.

In this second part of the trilogy, the tale becomes quite complex and breaks off into several strands. We are treated to Sam and Frodo's journey towards Mordor, The advenutures of Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli as they search for Merry and Pippin, and the adventures of the two missing Hobbits themselves. Along the way we meet the riders of Rohan, the men of Minas Tirith, Ents, Saruman and many other characters. There are tales of courage, bravery, treachery, wizadry, epic battles and lonely quests. This is a book that has it all.

I find when reading this that it not just the plot that I love, but the completeness of Tolkien's world. He has developed a whole history, mythology, geography and etymology for it, all incredibly detailed. The book does not describe these in detail, but has frequent sideways references to them. This is what sets it apart from other fantasies, the feeling of a complete reality in which the adventures are taking place, a rich and textured world. This adds a depth to the books which few others can match.

In all this is a great read in it's own right, and sets everything up nicely for the third installment. It has a lot of high advenure, and Tolkien's rich multilayered tale telling. It's a classic of it's time, and has to get 5 stars.

This unabridged reading from Rob Inglis is pretty good. For the most part it is excellent, though he can be a little flat in his delivery at times, and some of his voices are ill suited to the characters at times. All in all though it's a good reading. At 14 discs and clocking in at 16 hours 43 minutes of listening, this is perfect for the car on long journeys! I have to say that I listened to it back and forth to work over about a week, and my interest was maintained throughout, a testament to the skill of both author and reader. 5 stars all round.
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on 1 July 2015
I don't want to spoil it for anyone who hasn't read it yet so I will avoid saying anything in the story, but the book itself is well made and although paper back, I found it quite durable. The writing was easy to read and the chapters are well spaced. I am now looking forward to reading the third book in the series! I will say one thing however about the story; when I started reading the books, it was after watching the movies by Peter Jackson and I heard that you either like the books or the movies and rarely both, I used to think rather naively perhaps "Well if the movies are based off the books is there a difference?" Well after reading the first book and just finished reading this one I can say there are certainly more details in the books as compared to the movies. I won't say more for fear of spoiling the story but if you have watched the movies, give the books a try too you may be pleasantly surprised, I know I was/am :)

Now I'm off to read the third book! Happy reading all!
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on 9 March 2003
The two towers is a wonderful book on its own with amazing songs and poetry. The characters are brought to life in this set of cds with amazing voices. The songs are not spoken but sung, the elvish is very well spoken and fluent.
You'll want to listen to the cd over and over again. Its the best thing after watching the movie. Tolkien's books are knowen to be of amazing quality and one of the best classics of all time. This is a tale for an age but will be enjoyed more when you are older when you see the real quality of this work.
This adventure starts with the departure of boromir and the chase by Aragorn, legolas and gimli to find Merry and Pippin who have been captured by orcs. It later goes on about Frodo and Sam's frantic journey to destroy the ring, they are met by a character that they do not expect...
I would recomend this as a gift to anyone as it inspires everyone who reads it and they will wish they were there.
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on 19 July 2014
The Two Towers is the middle of Tolkien's epic saga, The Lord of the Rings. Widely considered as a classic, this trilogy begins in the rolling fields of the shire and takes us through a journey of enormous proportions till at last we reach our destination in Mordor. The character development as we go through this saga is second to none as we watch our heroes Frodo, Sam, Merry, Pippin, Gandalf, Aragorn, Legolas, Gimli and Boromir all do great deeds,to enable the fellowship to complete it's quest.

In this version of the book, it has a wonderful cover design which draws on the story itself and cleverly depicts the battle of Helm's Deep, a key battle in the story. As this is part of a set, it also has a sleeve design which when placed together with the other books in this set forms one of the most prominent images from the three books, the white tree of Gondor. A well crafted cover, with maps featuring inside the sleeves, I would recommend this version of The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers to any one who wishes to own their own version of this masterpiece.
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on 11 January 2015
I cannot praise Tolkien enough, The Lord of the Rings is a fascinating journey and one I think most wish would never have ended. Stepping back from the allegorical arguments that have accompanied his work over the decades and simply breathing in the world he created, to me there is no finer example in the fantasy genre. Thankfully Christopher Tolkien has long endeavoured to ensure most of his fathers work has seen the light of day to allow avid fans the opportunity to read deeper into Middle Earth, Arda and the ether beyond. The important thing for me is that Tolkiens written works will always be with us, while Peter Jacksons bastardisation of Tolkiens work will quickly disappear into obscurity sooner rather than later. I don't think I can make my feelings any clearer really.
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First published in 1954 TheTwo Towers is the second part of the epic saga, and Tolkien's masterpiece, The Lord Of The Rings. It has been a firm favourite of mine since I first read it over 25 years ago, and every time I return to the trilogy I find something new in this multilayered and deep piece of literature. I have worked my through it again recently, and with much temerity have decided to post a review of this stand out classic of classics.

In this second part of the trilogy, the tale becomes quite complex and breaks off into several strands. We are treated to Sam and Frodo's journey towards Mordor, The advenutures of Earagorn, Legolas and Gimli as they search for Merry and Pippin, and the adventures of the two missing Hobbits themselves. Along the way we meet the riders of Rohan, the men of Minas Tirith, Ents, Saruman and many other characters. There are tales of courage, bravery, treachery, wizadry, epic battles and lonely quests. This is a book that has it all.

I find when reading this that it not just the plot that I love, but the completeness of Tolkien's world. He has developed a whole history, mythology, geography and etymology for it, all incredibly detailed. The book does not describe these in detail, but has frequent sideways references to them. This is what sets it apart from other fantasies, the feeling of a complete reality in which the adventures are taking place, a rich and textured world. This adds a depth to the books which few others can match.

In all this is a great read in it's own right, and sets everything up nicely for the third installment. It has a lot of high advenure, and Tolkien's rich multilayered tale telling. It's a classic of it's time, and has to get 5 stars.  
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on 8 January 2002
After reading the first part of 'Lord of the Rings' I imidetly started on this book.
It keeps you griped and makes you wanting to find out what happenes. The characters are beliveible and the descriptions are second to none. It is not quite as good as 'The Felloship of the Ring' but still has that toilkien magic. I would recomend it to any one who is a fan of the genre but you must read the first book before.
'The two Towers' leaves you on a chilling cliffhanger that will make you want to the start the third book stright away.
All in all a great book: 10/10
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on 13 July 2013
When I was a Halfling, buying The Lord of the Rings was straightforward. If your Dad was rich, you got the three, grey-jacketed hardbacks of the second edition; if he wasn't, you got the fat yellow paperback with the Pauline Baynes cover, and mourned Allen & Unwin's cruel, cruel appendectomy. Nowadays the choice can be bewildering. One volume or three, paperback or hardback or deluxe hardback in a slipcase, illustrated in black and white by the Queen of Denmark or in colour by Alan Lee or not illustrated at all; you can even get your Lord in blingy green leather that wouldn't look out of place on an oil sheikh's personal Airbus. For me, though, Harper Collins's three volume hardcover 50th Anniversary Edition stands head and shoulder above its rivals - including four which are significantly more expensive.

The Two Towers (ISBN 9780007203550) is the book in the set most like its second edition predecessor. The only change in the text is its freedom from the accumulated errors that a crack squad of Tolkienologists have meticulously weeded out for us. As for illustrations, we get only Christopher Tolkien's time-hallowed red and black map of the West of Middle-earth: the good news is that it's in the improved version included in Unfinished Tales, the bad that it's been shrunk to a rather mean two page pull-out, and a pixelated one at that. Still, there's always the luxurious poster-sized version redone by John Howe in The Maps of Tolkien's Middle-earth: Special Edition.

The look of the text barely differs from 1954's, with runes and tengwar still embellishing the title page. L.E.G.O. SpA has done a good job of printing its PostScript Monotype Plantin on a smooth, magnolia paper, slightly lighter toned than that in my copy of The Fellowship of the Ring. The binding is well executed in traditional signatures that allow the book to lie flat when it's been opened; a black and yellow headband complements a sturdy black cover nicely gilded on its dignified, handsome spine.

The thick, matt, textured dust jacket is something of a special feature, giving us a painting by JRRT himself. The Ring and some of its tengwar brood over Orodruin, framed by Minas Morgul and Orthanc; a Nazgul glides past overhead, and there are also icons of the crescent Moon, the Nine, a pentacle and Saruman's White Hand. The lettering uses a warmly gleaming copper foil, which to my magpie tastes gives the book masses of shelf appeal.

If you simply want Tolkien, the whole Tolkien and nothing but Tolkien, this lovingly edited, well made Two Towers must surely be right at the top of your shopping list. I'd been surprised if there has ever been an incarnation of this book which has served Tolkien's invention more faithfully.

***************************************************************************************************************************

When I first read The Lord of the Rings back in 1969, one of the passages that most excited me came in the final paragraph of the Foreword. There it was that JRRT offered the tantalizing prospect of an entire, ultra-nerdy accessory volume. A complete index, more detailed linguistic information, and, no doubt, many other tasty bits and pieces too... I yearned for that Volume IV the way a modern teenager craves the latest iPhone. Well, Volume IV never materialized, but now, in the 50th Anniversary Edition of The Return of the King (ISBN 9780007203567 - The Return of the King (Lord of the Rings 3)) - which amazon in its wisdom will only let me review jointly with The Two Towers - we do at least have an index which Christina Scull and Wayne G. Hammond have expanded from the second edition's twenty-four pages to a geek-friendlier thirty-nine. Also, the Bolgers and the Boffins have been honoured with family trees, and - most importantly of all - Tolkien's most dedicated scholars have eliminated every last defect from the text like Rangers hunting down so many fugitive orcs.

There are no illustrations in this edition, but it does have two of Christopher Tolkien's traditional red and black maps. A two-page fold-out of Gondor and its neighbours begins the book, contour lines and all, and another of the West of Middle-earth (Unfinished Tales version) concludes it. The second is perhaps a touch small, and both are regrettably pixelated, but of course, there's slways the gorgeous, poster-sized John Howe alternative in The Maps of Tolkien's Middle-earth: Special Edition.

The attractive design of the text wisely sticks closely to the first edition's. L.E.G.O. SpA have printed it very well indeed in PostScript Monotype Plantin on a smooth, slightly off-white paper much superior to the norm. The binding uses signatures graced with a coloured headband, and the book lies nicely flat when opened; a black cover sets off classically elegant gilt lettering.

The thick, textured dust jacket rejoices in a design by JRRT himself. There's the throne of Minas Tirith, the winged crown of Gondor and an angular tengwar monogram and proclamation of Elendil's; also Elessar's Elfstone, Gondor's seven stars and its emblematic White Tree - and, behind the Ephel Duath, the menacing shadow of Sauron. (If you remember the old India paper one volume deluxe edition of The Lord, it's the painting from which that book's foil cover motif was derived.) The (English) lettering is done in an unusual copper which has a lovely warm gleam to it.

There are several more expensive editions of The Return, but none that I'd rather pop into my basket. It's Tolkien for Tolkien purists. It'll be a shame if it yields its place in the catalogue to the forthcoming movie tie-in version.
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on 4 August 2014
I made a deal with my wife, she bought me these, I bought her a skirt. The skirt cost more but I got the best of the bargain: the books are prettier than the skirt. They look stunning on the shelf. No point of revewing the story, everything that can be said has been said. But if you want it in an edition that feels and looks good and will last your lifetime, buy this set.
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