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on 22 July 2013
What a story. Difficult to extricate if you are a desi in Inglistan. don't believe me? Check this out.
'In the suburbs people rarely dreamed of striking out for happiness. It was all familiarity and endurance: security and safety were the reward of dullness.' Huh, what do you think? Want more, here is a bit of a dialogue between an old immigrant (Anwer, owner of grocery store) and his freshly imported son in law (Changez) from India, specially brought in as extra help with the shop.
Anwer had reclaimed Changez and was patiently explaining to him about the shop, the wholesaler and financial situation. Changez stood there looking out of the window and scratching his arse, completely ignoring his father in law, who had no choice but to carry on with his explanation. As Anwer was talking Changez turned to him and said, 'I thought that it would much more freezing in England than this?'
Anwer was bewildered, irritated by his non sequitur.
'But I was speaking about the price of vegetables,' said Aner.
'What for?' asked Chagez in bewilderment. 'I am mailny a meat-eater.'

The book is filled with many tensions in the immigrant community of Asians in England. Between themselves, the Whites, and fresh arrivals like Changez.
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on 5 February 2015
I have read this book before in paperback and enjoyed it, so I saw it at a good price on kindle I thought I'd get it and re-read it, however the transcription is very poor with the wrong words being used all over the place, it in place of if on many occasions and so many other examples it would be impossible to list them all. I am afraid I got as far as chapter three before I got so annoyed with it I just gave up. I would have given it less stars but the actual book, as written by the author rather than the donkey who digitised it, is a wonderful, compelling book which I enjoyed immensely.
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on 17 May 2013
Amusing tale of life in south London's suburbia, as experienced by a not-entirely Indian family in the late seventies/early eighties, told from the point of view of the teenage son. Some very interesting observations throughout and an enjoyable read, especially for anyone from this area and time zone. The character in the title kind of fades away two-thirds in, and the ending is a little lame, possibly allowing for a B.o.S. 2! But you couldn't help warming to the characters who were richly observed and even parodied in some cases by the main character, Kalim. Style of writing very fluid and easy-to-read; a satisfying book.
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on 29 May 2013
I don't know what to say that hasn't already been said. Why did it take me so long to get around to reading this? Funny/tragic story of boy growing up in Brixton with Indian father and English mother. Potted history of the 70s/80s, lots of interesting but believable characters - based on real people?
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on 27 October 2013
This is quite a lengthy book with a large cast of characters. Parts of it are distinctly absurd but it has a racy plot and interesting characters. It regularly swings from farce to pathos. Some people might object to bad language but it adds authenticity.
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on 22 August 2013
A well paced book, good storyline with plenty of humour while at the same time confronting issues of prejudice. It's a healthy reminder of how things were in the 70's, and I like to think we have progressed since then, but some aspects of the book had an uncanny resemblance to present day views held by some.
Looking forward to reading " Something to tell you" next.
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on 19 May 2013
The more I read the more I enjoyed, as the characters developed it becomes harder to put the book down. The themes it explores are interesting but at its heart this is about contentment. Be happy with yourself and with what you have and strive to be what you can.
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on 3 July 2015
Loved it. Always wanted to read this book as a teenager, never got round to it. I wasn't disappointed when I did finally read it. Kureishi is a gritty writer with great characters.
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on 25 April 2016
Hanif Kureishi is a master story teller and this book is perhaps his crowning achievement: with a sure hand he has crafted a brilliant novel featuring fascinating plot development delivered in his inimitable style.
But his true strength is in his dramatically authentic dialogue. If only I could write like this!
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on 20 July 2015
Great writing by a great writer. Shame he's a relatively low output writer because he is a great story teller with a beautiful style
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