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4.7 out of 5 stars
91
4.7 out of 5 stars
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£9.16+ £1.26 shipping


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on 7 February 2001
music from the past this good really needs to be heard by the nu-metal/rock influenced youth of today, it beats stuffings out of most of the stuff they listen to. On this cd there are many memorable moments with songs like (sabbath bloody sabbath)when it goes in to a heavy powerful riff half-way through and the relaxing charm of (fluff). Songs like (killing yourself to live) and (looking to today) really put the cherry on top of this meaty rock cake of delight....BUY this album you will be presently surprised no matter what your musical leaning is.
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on 21 August 2014
I've just listened all the way through the gargantuan slab of molten hot metal that is Sabbath Bloody Sabbath and felt impelled to highlight it.

The first 4 Sabs LPs + Sabotage + the first 2 with Dio tend to get the most critical acclaim, and rightly so. But Sabbath Bloody Sabbath needs to be rapidly hoisted up there too - it's a colossal beast!!!

Most of these tracks boast a series of killer riffs welded together. Each is utterly compelling in its own right. Iommi is like a fire breathing dragon with each riff emerging, again and again, out of the previous one, burning its way through your brain.

Certainly Tony Iommi is the undisputed heavyweight champion of the heavy metal guitar riff - he's rarely ever failed throughout his career IMO. Every riff here could battle its way easily to the top of the all time best lists. Sabbath Bloody Sabbath itself, has a sound that immediately shocks you to attention - Iommi's 2nd best one after Symptom IMO.

One day the critics will recognise the work of Iommi and Sabbath, not only as definitive heavy metal, but also as a bona fide artform. The way Tony churns out riff after riff so eloquently describes the factory production lines of industrial Birmingham. Perhaps he is the LS Lowry of Heavy Metal!?

Ozzy gives a typically incredible display of vocal theatre in the songs - portraying so many states of madness, fear, alienation, sorrow and twisted humour. Check out SBS, National Acrobat, Sabbra Caddabra, Killing Yourself to Live (uh, and all the vocal tracks actually).

And, as ever, Iommi, Geezer and Bill knit together as a phenomenal unit. Bill is undervalued. He has a unique drumming signature - very focused on Ozzy's singing. He can not really be replaced.

I find the sound here more crushing than the first 4 LPs and the imaginative invention is astounding - Clearwater Castle clearly got itself lodged in the band's brains.

Who Are You and Fluff are tasty changes of direction and the guitar in Spiral Architect cuts right through me.

I love Priest, Saxon, Diamond Head, Maiden, Metallica, Slayer, etc., but, for me, Sabbath are by far the greatest Heavy Metal band of them all.

My suggestion is go and find yourself a dark room with no disturbances and light a solitary candle. Wait until everything is quiet and then blast this LP out. Then tell me it's not an all time classic!
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on 21 April 2009
This album is excellent, my favorite three tracks are; "a national acrobat," "sabbra cadabra," and "killing yourself to live." This is one of three black sabbath studio albums that I own - the other two being "paranoid" and "black sabbath." I don't like this album as much as the other two, although it is a different style from the others, and of the three sabbath studio albums that I own, paranoid is my favorite. I think that this album is well worth getting.
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on 19 February 2003
Overlooked by fans and the band alike, this album, coupled with Sabotage, marks Sabbath's finest hour. As accomplished, coherent, brilliantly produced, orchestrated, sung and played as anything put out that decade, Sabbath skimmed the surface of the prog rock movement without getting bogged down in pretension. Makes previous Sabbath albums seem workmanlike. Sister album Sabotage a bit more hit and miss, but should be played together with this - The Writ, Spiral Architect, A National Acrobat, Looking for Today, Hole in the Sky and Thrill of it All widdle on the likes of Iron Man, Faries Wear Boots and NIB from a very great height. Following up such genius proved impossible, and both Technical Ecstasy and Never Say Die wilt by comparison
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on 30 September 2008
Totally awesome album. Every track is brilliant except for 'Fluff' which sucks. Buy or Die.
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on 25 November 2009
Overlooked by fans and the band alike, this album, coupled with Sabotage, marks Sabbath's finest hour. As accomplished, coherent, brilliantly produced, orchestrated, sung and played as anything put out that decade, Sabbath skimmed the surface of the prog rock movement without getting bogged down in pretension. Makes previous Sabbath albums seem workmanlike. Sister album Sabotage a bit more hit and miss, but should be played together with this - The Writ, Spiral Architect, A National Acrobat, Looking for Today, Hole in the Sky and Thrill of it All widdle on the likes of Iron Man, Faries Wear Boots and NIB from a very great height. Following up such genius proved impossible, and both Technical Ecstasy and Never Say Die wilt by comparison.

The 2009 remasters really are worth shelling out for - even if, like me, it's your third or fourth copy. There is a noticeable improvement to the sound, which is more than my ears could detect on The Beatles or Stones remasters. With a great booklet of pictures, a 2 page lyric sheet, an article putting the album in context (with contributions from Bill Ward) and a nice mid-price, this for me is an essential purchase. And yes, I'll still probably buy the Deluxe Version if they ever get round to releasing one.
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on 23 November 2005
This is one of 6 must have Black Sabbath albums (the first 5 and Heaven and Hell). Sabbath Bloody Sabbath for me is along time personal favourite. Sabbath Bloody Sabbath, the song displays a level of versitility that few praise Sabbath for, yet even fewer can obtain and all in one song! A National Acrobat also displays the whole band on top form, especially Tony Iommi's melodic yet heavy riffing. Sabbra Cadabra, is probably the most straight forward song here, but is not less than fanatastic, But in True Sabbath style they save an absolute corker of a song for last, The Spiral Architect, will still for me stands out because there's nothing else quite like it. Sabbath Bloody Sabbath, originally realeased in 1973, still is a milestone not only in Black Sabbath's career but in all Heavy Metal.
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I first got SBS in 1993, absolutley loved it, and still do! It's certainly my favourite Sabbath album, it works as a whole though its not a concept album. Each song offers something different, really showcasing the ability they have. Everyone is on great form, i really think this features Iommis best guitar playing, from the archetypal metal riff of the title track to the electronic wash of who are you, he is powerful but never overbearing the others. the pairing of looking for today with spiral architect is the albums highlight for me. Two really great songs, which i never tire of listening to, they finish the album on a uplifting mood. when you hear the applause at the end you just feel stunned at how good the album has been and wonder how 40 minutes can fly by so fast!
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on 17 September 2015
I remember a friend lending me this album along with 'Led Zeppelin 2' as a heavy rock primer back in the mid 70's. 'Led Zeppelin 2' was good, but 'Sabbath Bloody Sabbath' blew me away. It abandons the draggy grandeur of the first three abums for an almost prog rock approach. Highlights are the brutally riffing title track, the synth-driven 'Who Are You?' and the apocalyptic 'A National Acrobat'.
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on 24 February 2011
A great, almost experimental, album at a time when the winds of change were starting to blow. This showed Sabbath coming to the end of their down-tuned, doom-riffery and exploring the realms of modern and (now) classic rock; even easy listening and jazz on later albums. The darkness still remained however and it is that which added shade to the difference of some of the more upbeat tracks.

The title track is rightfully considered a classic, but to any new listeners it may be bewildering as to why? It needs a couple of spins before the lumpen riffs and tunes kick in. Great opening. 'A National Acrobat' is possibly the only filler track here. On its own it is ok but compared to the rest it's an also-ran. 'Fluff' blew me away completely. Not musically, as a feather could split it in 2!, but because of its placid, entirely serene notes. It is a 4 minute acoustic equivalent of laying in a grassy field by a river and a wood, maybe some hills, on a sunny day just after you've retired at the age of 30 with millions of pounds to do nothing with for the rest of your life - and it's sunny every day. As you can probably tell from my covert ironic-ese, it's a waft of a song. But it is beautiful. Will later appear on an album containing tracks that don't sound anything like they've been written by who they've been written by. On the down-side, it kind of sounds like the musical accompaniment to the viewers' gallery on the old Tony Hart children's art TV programme. But, actually, that isn't a bad thing. 'Sabbra Cadabbra' is more of an upbeat, traditional rock and roll tune. It's very good and is considered by many (including Metallica, who covered it very boringly) to be a classic. It's fun and breezy and tuneful and very good indeed, but it doesn't reach the heights of the title track or indeed other later tracks of other albums like 'Symptoms of the Universe'.

'Killing Yourself to Live' is great. Again, no classic but a very worthy and catchy track. It has a great opening riff. 'Who Are You' is also very good but is one of the more experimental additions. It revolves around a synthesised keyboard riff and is actually all the better for it. Much better than 'Am I Going Insane' from Sabotage, which was similar in execution. 'Looking for Today' is as 'Killing...' is. It is a great track, albeit slightly throwaway. 'Spiral Architect' is a great closer. Close to a classic it has a very infectious tune, is understated and quite sophisticated.

It may be a classic because of its stature in the Sabbath canon but musically it is only really a 4 star effort. This is not a criticism however as it is definitely a favourite of mine. But, in all honesty, later albums that many deride, like Tyr, The Eternal Idol and even Dehumanizer, are of equal, if not better quality.
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