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on 6 January 2016
A thoughtful and intelligent magazine. It has some great contributors.
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on 8 October 2010
I've been very impressed by my subscription to the 'New Statesman' and how it is presented on the Kindle. The writing is insightful and gives an interesting take on the news and the formatting makes it an easy read. I don't know if it would be a replacement for a paper copy but it's definitely worth giving it a go through the free trial.
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on 29 January 2011
I have just taken out a subscription after buying a one off last weekend when I also bought the Times as a one off. Newspapers just dont work, sorry guys, but they just don't.
However the NS as a magazine is good on paper but somehow better on the kindle... I prefer the kindle version to the paper one. The way it reads and is laid out is excellent, the standard of articles is good and the review section, I especially enjoyed. Ok its left of centre but even for those who are not, it is insightful, articulate and well presented.

A good mixture of serious and humour and in depth intelligent articles and reviews. Top Marks, whether left or right give it a try, it knocks the papers for six.
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on 2 May 2014
NS is an excellent hard copy magazine. Although extremely cheap, the Kindle version really is not worth bothering with, however. As others have noted, navigation is nearly impossible. The contents seem to be 'organised' in an almost random manner, so that a regular writer will be in one section one week, another the next. Indeed, the section names themselves change every couple of weeks. Author's names do not appear in the contents list. Your only choice is to click through everything.

Most importantly though, important content from the news-stand version is omitted. In recent months this has included two cover stories - that of Robert Skidelsky on economics and in the current issue (2.5.14), the piece on Islaam. I've struggled with the Kindle version of NS for over a year. I'd gladly pay more for a decent product, but I'm fed up with this. Such a shame.
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on 7 February 2017
I'll admit to some bias on this - our company, interconnect/it, is behind a new software product for Kindle e-ink publishers, and The New Statesman was one of the first to come on-board. The Kindle edition now has full support for images and a proper Section page which we hope will be well received by readers.

I've read The New Statesman for years and actually dipped into my own pocket to subscribe to this now myself!
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on 2 January 2011
An excellent read on the kindle (which seems particularly well suited to periodicals). I actually enjoy this more on Kindle than on paper, the presentation is good and article selection astute. It makes me chuckle often. Occasionally it informs me too. Between this and The Spectator all bases are covered.
Recommended.
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on 16 October 2014
Always enjoyed reading NS, be it print, on a tablet or on the Kindle. Articles themselves are laid out well on the Kindle Edition and you do get pretty much the same as the print version, minus pesky ads of course. However, the way the sections are laid out is pretty poor. Everything is mostly bundled into the "New Statesman" section which puts Culture, Back Pages, Columnists, the NS Essay and more into one big pot of 30 - 40 or so pieces. Navigating isn't a nightmare, but much harder than it needs to be, especially with touch and better performance of the Paperwhite models.

UPDATE: Below I said I had emailed NS and I got a response from Helen Lewis herself. Apparently, NS has been asking for access to developer tools to make the experience better on the Kindle and they still haven't gotten them. If you want to point the finger at anyone for this, point it at Amazon. Sad, really as Amazon are happy to promote this great read on the Newsstand but holds it back from being as enjoyable as it could be. Hopefully, the Kindle edition gets better and better.

I have emailed NS about this for feedback and hopefully they'll make the layout and menu system much more featured going forward. The content here is excellent as it always has been (if you're not a fan of their centre-leftish outlook you're better looking elsewhere) and it's just the menu that needs touching up.
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on 12 March 2011
Since purchasing my Kindle (latest version) I've dabbled with some newspaper trials but always felt that I was getting a substantially poorer experience at a fractionally cheaper price. I've been reading the New Statesmen for a few months now and I have been much happier with the format and the amount of content provided. The price is also very reasonable in comparison to the print edition. The tone of the magazine is left of centre and occasionally a bit too far left for my tastes, but the free trial will allow readers to decide if this is palatable to their own political sensibilities. Like most Kindle journals, a few more images would perhaps brighten things up but otherwise this is a good choice for a weekly commentary on UK current affairs.
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on 2 June 2015
This is a review of the Kindle edition rather than the magazine itself. The NS is an intelligent read, centre-left but not dogmatic, with a wealth of high-profile contributors. But the Kindle edition is an utter shambles. It serves up articles in completely random order, so if - like me - you prefer to start at the beginning and read through to the end, you have no idea what's coming next - and thanks to completely inadequate headlines, you still don't know what it is when it arrives. An essay, a column, a review, a letter to the editor? You are often a couple of paragraphs in before you can hazard a guess. Pages of frivolous back-half stuff come before the week's main features. The editorial page, which sets the tone for the issue and often highlights key articles, may not be encountered until half way through. If you find yourself reading a book review, no details whatsoever are given, so if the reviewer doesn't mention the title of the book, you are none the wiser.

This all compares very unfavourably with the Spectator's Kindle edition, which sets everything out clearly and in familiar order. With pictures. And it's also somewhat cheaper. I like to read both for a balanced political diet, but the Kindle NS is close to losing me.
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on 29 August 2014
Although it is stated in the description (at the bottom and out of the way), I was surprised to find that the Kindle edition does not contain all the articles from the print magazine. While it is to be expected that illustrations may not be included there seems to be no logic in which articles from the print edition will or won't appear, to the extent that the front cover can be misleading. The inclusion of the letters page seems slightly pointless when you cannot read the articles that the letters refer too. The quality of the writing is excellent, so it's a shame that we don't get all of it!

EDIT: The quality of the Kindle edition is getting worse and worse. It's quite clear they are either scraping the online articles or OCRing the PDF edition (I may just start doing the former myself and save myself £5 a month). Either way, as well as articles being missing, articles get repeated, attributed to the wrong author, have random paragraphs inserted in them, have line break hyphens in the middle of lines. Disappointing.
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