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Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
25
4.6 out of 5 stars
Paris Is Burning [DVD]
Format: DVD|Change
Price:£11.29+ £1.26 shipping


on 13 February 2014
Did you ever wonder where Madonna got the idea for Voque from? A gritty and glam documentary about the 'Houses' in New York!
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on 24 September 2017
Embracing and informative
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on 19 August 2015
Best queer/lgbtqi movie ever.
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on 2 March 2016
Great.
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on 19 March 2013
What an amazing film. Funny, interesting, moving and beautiful. A glimpse into the gay scene in New York, a bit of social history into how a sub group protect themselves, develop their own culture and the prejudice and violence they can encounter.
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on 16 May 2012
This is the master piece of the documentation of NY club culture in 1990, directed by Jennie Livingston. I have come a cross so many 'fashionista' and 'club kids' these-days in the night scene in London. They posed themselves as 'original and new' and think they are different to others. But then, how many of these young fashionista actually understand about its history of club culture and being dressing up or what mean by being a Drag? The film shot in the mid to late 1980's, 'documentary of the end of the "Golden Age" of New York City drag balls, as well as a thoughtful exploration of race, class, and gender in America.' This film capture meanings by club culture, Drag, and the 'Houses' system which is a group of young gay mens that individually live in their difficult situation and the time of being gay in those days.
It is not only about the gay culture or club kids, but it is an illustration of the individual's life in documentary style.

I suggest anyone who involved with club industries and fashion to look at even its gay or not. Its all about the ways of surviving that someone had to get through.
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on 11 July 2017
Really wanted to love this but its narrators obsession with money and material wealth above almost all else diminished it. The cars, fame, richness and money first, then sexual identity/transition. Probably edit issue partly to blame and thankfully much better representations of trans perspectives now.
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on 20 October 2014
great item and arrived quickly
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on 22 June 2017
Amazing snap shot of a cult sub genre that inspired and continues to inspire generations to this day. Its also a sad reminder of where gay culture has come from. I do however take humbridge with the relentless queens out there, taking side swipes at Madonna for 'stealing' ideas from the underground Vogue movement. You cant steal what somebody doesnt own! Besides, Malcom Mclaren was under its influence too, yet he never gets anything but praise! One wonders if Kylie or Gaga would get the same treatment?! And they have zero connection to true gay sub culture! What Madonna did was to elevate its status to the masses, and she did it packaged up with a flawless dance track that had zero to do with the dance actually, and it was much better than Mclarens effort, nothing wrong with that. she also elevated numerous dancers from the original Vogue balls with her and put them ALL up front and fabulous in her video! She had been attending the balls for years with her dancers, her friends like Haring, Basquait, Herb Ritts, they were all fans of the underground Vogue scene, so it wasnt exactly a new concept to her that she just dipped into and leafed whatever she fancied. Her gay dancers that took her to the balls, they were the stars of her Vogue video along with the other numerous attendee's of NYC's Vogue Ball scene. Without Madonna, Vogue would never have sufaced above the underground, and in a way the plight of many affected by AIDS and their fight against opression would have remained in the dark. Hats off to Madonna i say and hats off to to this film, both deserve all the success they achieved!
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on 4 June 2009
I saw repeated clips of this documentary while dancing on Sunday nights at Horsemeat Disco in South London, and made my mind up to find and watch the film. I'm so glad I did.

PIB provides us with painfully honest insight into the lives of the poor, largely black, gay, disenchanted New York youths who relied on the Harlem drag ball culture for their only source of personal and socio-familial identities. Through belonging to the various cultural 'Houses', these kids (some shockingly young) found a place where they could be themselves and celebrate their sexual, social and racial identities without fear. Bold and beautiful if home spun, the Balls they attended were a life focus for many of the youth featured in the film.

Rivalry and passion are all there in this subcultural exposé, but unlike their straight counterparts on New York's streets, these gay kids used dance to air their differences and settled for being 'out-shaded' as a means to calm bad air or disputes. Theatrically utopian as it may sound, would that modern day gang members would resort to such non-lethal means as dance to settle grudges!

PIB is as much about inspiration and dreams as it is about the hottest dance movement ever to collide with this world. When voguing, these kids can become the stars they so desperately want to be. There are no economic or social barriers in dreamland, which is where their dancing takes them, as individuals and as a group. To see this astounding aspirational narrative played out is at once a privilege and a sad indictment of America's inclination to negate her forgotten youth.

With many of the film's main protagonists working as hustlers and prostitutes to survive, it is ruinously ironic that a rudimentary internet search reveals how the 'families' in the film have been decimated by AIDS. What the film displays in rude definition is that dreams and fantasies can only provide a limited protection and that too much dreaming can be as dangerous as none.

It is hurtful and deeply disturbing to know that such young, vibrant, creative and beautiful individuals are gone. What is doubtless is that the Paris they created has scorched its indelible mark on the cultural subconscious of the modern world - a fact which would plainly thrill all the mothers and children of every House, living and dead.

If Paris truly burned, the epicentre of it's heat would be a drag ball in Harlem.

Burn, baby...burn!
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