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4.8 out of 5 stars
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4.8 out of 5 stars
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on 22 October 2005
What a glorious soundtrack. I must have listened to it hundreds of times and its beauty has actually made me weep. Glorious interplay of strings and piano. Some hauntingly sad tracks (17) are counterpointed by upbeat (Arriving at Netherfield 7)and the brisk military march. Highly highly recommended. Listen out for track 15 which is the famous field scene in the movie, and when you hear the piano solo start, picture Lizzie Bennett looking through the mist and seeing the love of her life walking towards her.... magical.
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on 3 October 2005
This is one of the most beautiful and emotional soundtracks I've heard in a long time. Some of the tracks are happy and up-tempo while others are sad and melancholy. Even though I can't say enough in its praise, there is one thing wrong with it, and that is the fact that it is so short...barely 40 minutes. Nevertheless it is breath-taking, and if you are undecided as to whether you should buy it, my answer would be a huge and emphatic YES!!!
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on 2 October 2005
If you love the movie then this is a must have buy.....even if you don't love the movie buy it anyway! It really reflects the emotions that you feel when watching it and is incredibly powerful. I honestly don't think theres a bad track on this CD, but my favourite would have to be "Your hands are cold" because of the gorgeous cello and flute moments. BUY THIS CD!!!
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on 19 April 2006
All I have to say is that this score has surprised me as much as the film itself did. Being a fan of the BBC version and its brilliant score by Simon Langton, I didn't expect much of the new ones, but I have to confess I have liked them both.

The score is incredibly simple, yet beatiful and haunting. It is based on very few motives or themes, but combined with such skill and taste that they adapt wonderfully to the image.

I am sure everyone will love listening to this beautiful music, no matter whether they have seen the film or not-it's brilliant in itself.
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on 2 October 2005
I am in love with this cd. I'm a devoted big Jane Austen fan and the soundtrack to Emma Thompsons version of Sense and Sensibility has long been a favourite. I'm a sucker for good classical soundtracks. Before I walked out of my (first out of three) viewing of the new Pride and Prejudice film I'd decided to get the soundtrack. Darcy and Elizabeths first dance, and the shot of her on a hillside in Derbyshire, the music behind it had made up my mind for me. The soundtrack does not disappoint. The music is a perfect accompaniment to the story, the Colin Firth adaptation music was just a bit too chirpy for me, this one has the right touch of melancholy and heartbreak. It's mainly led by piano and is a truly beautiful piece of music. I first thought it a bit strange that the music sequence was not in the same order as the story line (Pemberley is track number three) but it does all flow well the way it is. My one tiny criticism is that some tracks sound remarkably like others, but hey, it still gets five stars because I don't mind more of a good thing! If you enjoyed the film I heartily recommend it. Go buy!
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on 16 December 2013
I must say I loved this movie beyond words. I am a fan of the BBC version, and of Colin Firth, but this Pride and Prejudice was just amazing. I love Keira and her Oscar nomination for the role of Lizzie Bennet is well-deserved. Her Lizzie is compassinate, not just witty and audacious. Her love for Darcy visibly grows, unaffected by his wealth. And I became a Matthew Macfadyen fanatic after this movie, of course. You cannot not to. He delivers such Darcy that just blows you away. As much as I love Colin, he saw Darcy as a proud bastard, and this is how he played him - this is what he himself said. Still, his Darcy is lovable, because it's Colin, c'mon. But Matthew's Darcy is a much deeper character. He's conflicted, he's tormented, he's confused, he's misunderstood. He really is heartbreaking. And a sexual tension between his Darcy and Lizzie is so strong, it's a beautiful thing to watch, very overwhelming as it is heartbreaking, because they keep pushing each other away inspite of a very strong mutual attraction. The movie is more realistic in terms of the life in the country, which I could do without, actually, but what is more important, about the choices these people have. When Mrs. Bennet says they are going to starve once Mr. Bennet is dead, it's not a joke, but a reality. When Charlotte Lucas says she would marry anyone with a home, it's not because she's not romantic as in the BBC version, but because she's 27, with no money or prospects, and already a burden to her family. This movie is delightful, romantic, passionate, and the final scence when Mr. and Mrs. Darcy kiss at their home is beautiful beyond compare. Buy this version of DVD, as some have this most berautiful scene of this film cut. Don't miss it!!!
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on 20 July 2014
This particular variant of this film/novel is the standard on which I compare all variations of Pride & Prejudice, absolute perfection, Joe Wright got it spot on. I enjoyed it so much that I purchased this CD of the beautiful ethereal music that accompanied the film , and when played it brings an extra dimension to Jane Austen,s masterpiece. I think even the die hard Janeite,s ( of which I am one ) would agree it is a perfect score to run along side the film.
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on 29 May 2007
It isn't often, that a soundtrack truly survives the movie. Usually, it's great as long as the listener can remember the movie, then the soundtrack falls apart. The soundtrack to Pride and Predjudice is the exception.

First of all, the music is a prominent character in the movie - always present to perfection and always accenting the story, the characters, the environment and the atmosphere.

Secondly, this soundtrack is able to stand on its' own feet and be a audible feast to the listener. The music is beautiful beyond words, full of sentiment and feeling. The pianist is remarkable.
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on 29 February 2012
Why do we buy soundtracks? After all, the soundtrack is an integral part of the film and the pieces are often written to fit the visual mood of a scene exactly, so when you listen to the music by itself, there's always something missing.

..That's one argument, anyway.

But the other is that the film always leaves you wanting to hear more, in its entirety, without sound effects, without the dialogue, just the music which the film invariably only gives you obscured or incomplete snatches of, and I've never felt that more than I did when watching the 2005 Knightley/MacFadyen version of Pride and Prejudice for the first time.

I thought the film was quite good...

...I thought the score was amazing, and it's interesting to note that both Amazon's sellers and the reviewers here actually value the soundtrack CD more highly than they do the DVD of the film.

As a classical music dunce I had assumed that the lovely predominantly piano based, authentically period-sounding pieces used throughout the film were something that other people would recognise: Beethoven sonatas, probably. When I looked into it I was amazed to find that all the best pieces were original, although carefully written in the spirit and style of the period or earlier. The plaintive, sweet little tune Elizabeth and Darcy dance to at Netherfield is a version of part of 'Abdelbazer' by Henry Purcell - If you happen not to have come across Purcell and you'd like to hear more by him, try seeking out the many versions of his bittersweet aria 'Dido's Lament' to be found on the web.

Like some others here I found the presence of the martial tune to be a bit of a distraction - if this was a vinyl recording I would banish it to the B-side where I could choose to listen to it when I wanted to.

As good as this CD is, I can't imagine listening to it and getting the full benefit of it without also having seen the film - If you haven't actually seen the film then do that first, and then you'll understand why you absolutely must have the soundtrack CD.
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on 29 September 2005
There will be inevitable comparison with the equally excellent BBc/Andrew Davies production of Jane Austen's novel in which Carl Davis produces a very good musical score. However Dario Marianelli desrves the utmost credit for a very moving soundtrack. In the sleeve notes he says he wanted to combine the melodic piano with the storyline, he suceeds! Jean Yves Thibaudet is a gifted pianist and having seen the film his playing very much captures the essence of the story. I f you liked Carl Davis' score you will love this.
I bought the CD before I saw the film and I can say that I enjoyed the film more for doing so. On my return from seeing it I played this CD from start to finish and found the melodic themes taking me to the settings of this very good film.
I am a great admirer of Andrew Davies who has produced some very good adaptions of Jane Austen Novels and his 6 hour version was worthy of the praise it got. The film version had to do the same in 2 hours and it suceeds in many ways
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