Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
4
5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 7 February 2013
Was looking for a CD version, (any chance?), But mp 3 will do, since it's the original authentic recording, a bit of a rare thing these days when "fools" insist on "digitally remastering",re-recording or "adding their input".
This is a "time capsule" of historic authentic entertainment, which is still a gem decades later.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 May 2009
I bought the LP when it came out years ago from Windows of the Arcade, Newcastle and recently ( 2008) this cd from Amazon............... The "Along the Coaly Tyne" compilation cd has more tracks, but this cd is even better due mainly to the Armstrong compositions rendered as usual in true geordie/northumbrian by Johnny Handle, Tom Gilfellon, Lou Killen & co. Just listen to the pause in the song with the patter "Good morning Mr Armstrong............." in "The Schoolboard Man". Instumental work also terrific......hard to beat.....
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 October 2012
Armstrong was not a recording artist but a poet whose rambling were published as broadsides during the Victorian era and a typical character of countless Catherine Cookson novels
He lived util 1919 when recorded sound was in its infancy and WW1 had just ended
Here his poems have instruments added and are performed by 60s folk singers.
Originally an LP on Topic it was recorded in Co Durham
Its a good job the words are included for the sake of those who don't understand Geordie
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 June 2013
A mixture of ballad, humour and political/social history which makes you laugh, makes you empathise and sometimes makes you angry about the way in which the property owning classes treated their workers and families. The Trimdon Grange Explosion is perhaps the most haunting folk ballad I've ever heard. By contrast the story of the Marley Hill Ducks is just plain daft and highly entertaining.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


Need customer service? Click here