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on 19 May 2017
Brilliant
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on 30 May 2002
This album is deep. its not what you might have been expecting after 36 chambers, but if u judge it on it's on merits rather than comparing it with previous work, you'll realise that this is a classic. first off it is a deep album. this is probable it's biggest flaw (commercially)- it's full of deep, meaningful lyrics, which unfortunatley these days seem to take the back foot to guns, money, ice, and hoes. in the word's of ghostface (slightly edited so this review will actually get published): ''All we gonna do is just keep doin' what we do best. We know one thing - that there is more dumb people than smart people, so when we bring Wu-tang Forever and we preach to people, nobody want to hear that stuff. It's like I'm tryin' give you knowledge and teach you and tell you to do somethin' right, you don't want to hear that. Forever was like college - we stepped our rhymes up. People didn't want to hear that though. So now we know like: hold on, nah, that's too strong for 'em.' Can't feed a baby steak: can't digest it, he can't even chew it; he ain't gonna want it.''
i think that little paragraph sums it up really well. it was a deep album, but alot of it just flew over people's heads, so it didnt get the respect it deserves. to this day i dont know how professional reviewers allowed this to get past them without appreciating it, but maybe it was too deep for most of them too. im not gonna break down the LP track-by-track as the last guy did that. although i will point out that 'a better tomorrow' is one of the greatest songs of all time, and 'impossible' contains 2 of the best verses i've ever heard.
all i can really say is buy this album and judge it for your self, but give it a few listens before u pass judgement, as it can take a fair few listens to understand some of the lyrics, and a few of the tunes have to grow on you.
but in conclusion this is a true master piece, and for little more than a tenner you can't go wrong. BUY IT!!!!
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on 30 August 2000
After the big beat intensity of the debut i was in high hopes that the Wu could match it with this double album, how wrong i was this is very poor commercial rap and it goes to show that even rappers as talented as those in the wu have lost the plot completely. There is not a single song on this album that sticks in the mind and i have listened to it more then a dozen times trying to get my head around and it just does not work, other then the fantastic Cypress Hill and the Beastie Boys hip hop has gone completely pear shaped in the latter half of 90's succumbing to the superstar lifestyle and high profile best reflected by Puff Daddy, rappers of this day and age have become a joke. With no Chuck D or Rakem on the scene anymore its hard not to see why the Hip Hop scene is in a mess and to be honest i do not think it will ever recover it will become more and more "poppy" and the lyrics less meaningful, whereas Enter the Wu tang was closer to a rock or metal album, Wu tang forever would nestle nicely next to NSYNC and Britney Spears, a real waste of good talent thank god for tha Hill.
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on 30 May 2002
This album is deep. its not what you might have been expecting after 36 chambers, but if u judge it on it's on merits rather than comparing it with previous work, you'll realise that this is a classic. first off it is a deep album. this is probable it's biggest flaw (commercially)- it's full of deep, meaningful lyrics, which unfortunatley these days seem to take the back foot to guns, money, ice, and hoes. in the word's of ghostface ''All we gonna do is just keep doin' what we do best. We know one thing - that there is more dumb people than smart people, so when we bring Wu-tang Forever and we preach to people, nobody want to hear that stuff. It's like I'm tryin' give you knowledge and teach you and tell you to do somethin' right, you don't want to hear that. Forever was like college - we stepped our rhymes up. People didn't want to hear that though. So now we know like: hold on, nah, that's too strong for 'em.' Can't feed a baby steak: can't digest it, he can't even chew it; he ain't gonna want it.''
i think that little paragraph sums it up really well. it was a deep album, but alot of it just flew over people's heads, so it didnt get the respect it deserves. to this day i dont know how professional reviewers allowed this to get past them without appreciating it, but maybe it was too deep for most of them too. im not gonna break down the LP track-by-track as the last guy did that. although i will point out that 'a better tomorrow' is one of the greatest songs of all time, and 'impossible' contains 2 of the best verses i've ever heard.
all i can really say is buy this album and judge it for your self, but give it a few listens before u pass judgement, as it can take a fair few listens to understand some of the lyrics, and a few of the tunes have to grow on you.
but in conclusion this is a true master piece, and for little more than a tenner you can't go wrong. BUY IT!!!!
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on 14 October 2008
The Only ther Wu Tang Album that I've written a review on is the Gza's 'Liquid Swords'. This has '5 star' reviews to burn (including mine), whereas this has only one review, and that review doesn't even begin to enunciate the merits of this album.

Whereas L-Swds is an artistically deep album, with the Gza's use of lyrics, and the Rza's beats transcending just about everything else that has ever happened in hip-hop, artistically, supported by the sheer life experience and world significant seriousness, contained in Gza's wittily delivered lines, WuTang Forever, is more direct, more mainstream, designed to sell more records in a way BUT, it's message is clearer than that of L Swds.

This is a really postive Hip Hop album (in a very non Fresh 'never hustled a day in his life' Prince & Jazzy Jeff kinds way) which tells, principally the black and the downtrodden in society that they should work to turn their lives around. This message is coming from people who came from the bottom of the gutter, and the emotion contained in songs like 'Projects' is palpable (in the housing, thousands seen early graves, Victims of world ways......).

After albums that glorify guns, violence, crime, mysoginy this is where the mature successful hip-hop artist is supposed to take things.

A really special piece of work, especially because it's not an impenetrable as LSwds (which I absolutely love), so this great message reaches a lot of people.
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on 24 March 2000
I first heard this album back in 1997 when it was already over 4years old. I was amazed at how fresh it sounded. Its raw origin (shaolin) style set a whole new standard to which subsequent ablums are marked against, it heralded a revolution in rap and started a new era that has had a far futher reaching audience than ever before.
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on 7 April 2001
after their first release "enter the wu 36 chambers" and numerous solo albums, wu tang are "reunited" which is the name given to the first single off the album, and one of my favoritesm, wu tang keep it real throughout the album and track 10 shows them at their best. The track is entitled "A better tommorow", this is some mature music for the wu as they explain to others that u cant waste your life or yr seeds (Chilldren) will grow up the same way. Then Truip (second single) shows them at their best and also a ODB track "dog S***". the album keeps it the wu tang style and has songs for whatever mood im in, if u dont have this now, i strongly reccoment you get it
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on 21 February 2003
The perceived downfall of the Wu Tang Clan can be traced back to this release. Before 'Forever' the Wu could do no wrong in the eyes of the critics. Their debut release, 'Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)' was held to be one of the greatest hip hop albums ever made. The five solo albums that were released after '36 Chambers' were each held in equally high regard. Then, however, things went slightly off course for the Wu. 'Forever' was delayed for so long, many fans began to wonder if it would ever appear. Then when it arrived many fans were sceptical of this hip hop double LP that weighs in at over two hours long.
As early as the first track proper prove the doubters wrong, 'Reunited' has the Gza fire an opening salvo on those artists who had been copying the Wu's style while they had been gone, "Reunited, double-LP, the world excited / struck a match to the underground / industry ignited / from metaphorical parables to fertilise the Earth / wicked ni**ers come try to burglarise my turf / scatting off soft a** beats them ni***rs rap happily / tragically, that style, deteriorates, rapidly." It's great opener, and one that reassures the listener that whatever they've read about this LP, the Wu-Tang mean business.
Released in 1997, this was the time when Rza was prepared to take a few risks with his production. On 'Cash Still Rules / Scary Hours', Ghostface Killah is tearing through a typically uncompromising verse when the music simply runs out leaving Ghost to finish his verse acapella. Equally, 'For Heaven's Sake' with its odd high-pitched warble effect is one of Rza's more innovative tracks.
The first disc concludes with 'It's Yourz' an attempt by the Wu to match some of their earlier anthems. It has Rza, in typically self-appreciating style, shout, "It's yours / the seed and the black woman / it's yours / double LP from Wu Tang Clan." If the first disc had been released alone, the listener could not have too many complaints. Strange then that the second disc contains just as many, if not more, classic Wu-Tang tracks.
The second disc kicks off with the single 'Triumph'. It's a dark affair, with the Wu positioning themselves as soldiers on a battleground ("War of the masses / the outcome disastrous / many of the victims families save their ashes / a million names on walls and graves and plaques / those who went back receive penalty for their acts."). Elsewhere on disc two, 'Impossible' has the Wu in preachy mood, Raekwon tells us, "The murder rate is increasing and we're decreasing / so at the same time that you play with guns... / that causes conflict against your own."
For the most part this is a group effort, but at certain points during disc two, the rappers break off into pairs to differing effect. 'The MGM' has Raekwon and Ghostface Killah trading the microphone line by line over a typically stark backing track. 'Dog S**t' is ODB and Method Man's chance to shine in the absence of the rest of the group. Frankly, the result is a juvenile, misogynistic track that somehow manages to be semi-entertaining. However, for those still in any doubt about the political correctness of the Wu the following track, 'Duck Seazon' is an entirely immature tirade about homosexuality.
Typically the album is highly cinematic. From the sleeve design to the b-movie snippets to the hilarious virtual tour of the Wu Mansion (a CD-ROM extra found on disc one), the album has a Hollywood feel to it.
I've always been of the opinion that the press were unduly savage on 'Forever'. It's not quite the equal of '36 Chambers' but it really isn't far away. Criticisms of it being overlong are not unfounded and perhaps one or two of the tracks would have been better left on the production room floor, but album with twenty-nine tracks will have one or two weak ones. 'Forever' should be an essential purchase for any hip hop fan.
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on 6 September 2000
I have to say that I thought that Enter wasn't as good as it could have been, but this 2-cd sequal has it all! No matter what mood I'm in, there are tracks to suit it.
Long May the Wu reign!
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on 31 October 2000
I could go on about how incredible the wu tang are and what they stand for but i wont. this album describes the way of the wu. telling an unimaginable story of the wu tang and the ways of the wu. This album has some great tunes limited by the fact they must end. We see great performances by meth the gza, ODB, Masta killah, inspectah deck, chefraekwon and ghost face. The RZA yet again puts in his great touch as the producer finishing all tunes with crisp beats and rough basslines. this album confirms that wu tang clan are a force to be rekoned with
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