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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
27
Grand Prix
Format: MP3 Download|Change
Price:£5.49


on 11 July 2017
Only listened to half this album so far, having been alerted to it back in the day but never given it a listen before. Harmony laden guitar pop, a bit heavier than their most recent album (which I consider to be excellent) but the tunes are cracking.
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on 18 July 2017
Great band and a great cd.
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on 17 May 2015
There is no point in adding to the provenance of this great piece of guitar driven pop. It's a modern classic. Sparky's Dream gets me every time. Just great. If you don't already own this album, you probably should. Say no more.
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on 8 December 2017
Wonderful album. Very prompt delivery
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on 8 June 2017
Fantastic! Thank you :0)
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on 27 December 2014
Perfect
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on 10 March 2015
Very good, their best
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VINE VOICEon 21 June 2015
After the dismal showing of their underrated downbeat third album, 'Thirteen', Teenage Fanclub finally got rid of its faux-grunge inclinations and released an album of high quality, polished indie/jangle guitar pop that should have blown every other album from the Britpop days into the long grass. Maybe it was just too charming for its own good. Creation Records were probably more interested in the loutishness of the Gallaghers to push this record and if that's the case they have done the band and the album a great disservice.

Opening with Raymond McGinley's "About You", breezing through Gerard Love's classic "Sparky's Dream" and Norman Blake's ryely-titled "Mellow Doubt", 'Grand Prix' showed that all three songwriters had reached a collective peak that beat their previous impressive efforts. The album achieves greater height in the following four tracks, "Don't Look Back", "Verisimiltude" (can you imagine any Britpop band coming up with a song to match a title like that?), the brilliant "Neil Jung" (another brilliant title) and the mournful "Tears" that marries guitars, piano, brass and strings together in a beautiful song that somehow seems to read like a tribute to the late Kurt Cobain.

The pop smarts come back in the second half of the album with "Discolite", and "Say No" and "Going Places" display a downbeat indie-pop vibe before the sweet "I'll Make It Clear" and darker "I Gotta Know" bring us to the final, throwaway track called "Hardcore/Ballad", but even that is somehow rendered as an essential exit to a classic record.

Now, all this gushing may lead you to believe that I have lost perspective on this album, and, quite frankly, it is so great that there is no other way to express how awesome it is. 5 stars is the least it deserves.
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on 2 May 2010
Only fourteen reviews for this gleaming pop gem?

A simply fantastic record, one of the albums of the nineties and at at this kind of price it's a crime not to own it. In common with much other Fannies material, Grand Prix both jangles and rocks, semi-acoustics thrashed through overdriven AC30s, but still leaving plenty of room for those effortless harmonies, existing somewhere in the space between Big Star, REM and the Hollies, but with melodies to top any of them. Why were they not huge? My guess is that none of them had the colossal ego that hugeness demands - too unassuming and funny to carry off the whole rockstar thing - and that kind of stupid name, which - just my theory - I reckon a lot of people never got beyond. Well, their loss, because pop genius this special doesn't call very often...
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on 6 October 2015
I recently dug out Songs From Northern Britain as I remember it being a pretty cool album and then I dig out Grand Prix. Blimey, wow, blimey, It's nothing short of brilliant. Seriously. Starts off with About You and just doesn't stop, each song flowing into the next and only lets up after Neil Jung where it slightly changes pace. The songs are so well crafted and the sound and sense is so warm you'll just want to hug the hi-fi. It just shows how amazing '95 was for music when this album can get overlooked, but then again after the long-awaited and disappointing previous album Thirteen its hardly surprising. So if you've never heard it, take the plunge, not only will you be delighted you did, but you'll be raving like a loon as to how good it is.
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