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4.5 out of 5 stars
33
4.5 out of 5 stars
Coney Island Baby
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on 24 June 2017
A sense of a happy and relaxed Lou Reed on this LP.. Beautiful work all round..
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on 3 October 2017
This is one of my favourite Lou Reed albums. Disappointed with Lou's remix, everything's been cleaned up & separated. It's lost it's warmth, shame I seem to have 'lost' my original mix. On the plus side, some of the alternative mixes are pretty interesting & well worth having.
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on 31 March 2014
I love Lou reed. The title track still makes me quiver like only Isaac Hayes' 'By the Time I Get to Phoenix' can otherwise do. A absolute genius.
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on 2 October 2017
Great service, 5 star cd.
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on 11 March 2014
This is one of Lou Reed's most divisive albums that splits opinion.

My own view (for what it is worth) is that it is an excellent album that has classic moments on it.

Lou is a lot more subdued here than on early releases and often the beauty is in the subtlety of the songs and the poetic lyrics.

For me, it is not quite up there with his very best, but it is nevertheless a lovely album which shows us another side of Lou's talent...after all, wouldn't it be boring if they all sounded like 'Transformer'?
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 7 July 2006
By the mid-1970s, Lou Reed had alternately beguiled and appalled his long-suffering fanbase. His debut solo album was a sloppy set of warmed-over Velvets leftovers; 'Transformer' had charm in abundance, incisively shaped by the involvment of David Bowie and Mick Ronson. 'Berlin' was a grimly conceptual affair. The 'live albums offered up heavy metal makeovers of Velvets faves. 'Sally Can't Dance' was execrable. With 'Coney Island Baby', a relatively relaxed Lou assembled perhaps his first solo album that one could say was pretty good, as opposed to being either brilliant or brutal. It contains, in 'She's My Best Friend', a kind of AOR retooling of a (then) unreleased Velevt Underground tune; 'Kicks' seemed almost gratuitously sick, whilst the title track has a warmth and affection that is of great appeal. Plus, like a lot of Reed's most sentimental moments, it clearly shows how much doo-wop was an abiding infuence on him. He's never going to sing the birds off the trees, but at least he sounds like he's trying, if his ability to match music as powerful as his lyrics is notably lacking in one or two places. Well worthy of investigating.
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on 11 March 2014
This is one of Lou Reed's most divisive albums that splits opinion.

My own view (for what it is worth) is that it is an excellent album that has classic moments on it.

Lou is a lot more subdued here than on early releases and often the beauty is in the subtlety of the songs and the poetic lyrics.

For me, it is not quite up there with his very best, but it is nevertheless a lovely album which shows us another side of Lou's talent...after all, wouldn't it be boring if they all sounded like 'Transformer'?
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on 22 October 2007
Coney Island Baby is ultimately a record-deal-filler album, something to get Lou back on track after the unlistenable Metal Machine Music. Nonetheless, its very good indeed. Lou's vocal style is exactly the same as on Transformer, but instead of Mick Ronson's buzzing glam riffs, we have some impeccable mid-70s session muso backing- a supple, intricate rhythm section and lots of wanky note-bending guitar. It has a real period charm, and the songs are up to the mark. Nothing here quite up to the heights of Walk on the Wild Side, but it comes close. The cute lick which opens Crazy Feeling is infectious, She's My Best Friend is another stand-out, and Gift has a lovely melody as well as showcasing Reed's tongue-in-cheek humour. Kicks, despite its jazzy stylings, tries to explore darker, more sadistic lyrical themes- it sounds a bit too much like Lou trying to live up to his Velvets reputation. But the sweeping closer of the title track is another stand-out, and explores more a intimate, vulnerable Lou, expressing his dream as a kid to "play football for the coach." Who would have thought it, from the man who wrote "Venus in Furs"?

The mastering on this re-issue is superb- this album is definitely one of Lou's high points from the 70s.
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on 10 August 2007
Lou Reed needed to make this album. His previous work, the infamous Metal Machine Music had alienated all except the chin-stroking arty brigade. No one in their right mind would call that collage of feedback and screaming a work of genius, however bold and unprecedented. So with his recording contract with RCA hanging by a thread, mounting legal battles, no money and no guitars all Reed had was music.
What we have in Coney Island Baby may appear to be typical Reed fare- biographical songs of growing up and the environment of his youth delivered with lyrics that cut you one moment and amuse you the next. However it is the wonderful music that really delivers the punch of the album, but in a much more gentle and tuneful way than the Reed we know, or tend to pigeon-hole. The musicianship is wonderful, drummer Michael Suchorsky is superb and entwined with Bruce Yaw on bass you have a powerful musical muscle- Reed has always known how to put together a great rhythm section. Reed's guitar work is better than ever and he sings with genuine warmth, though thankfully without twee sentimentality.
I rate this album as highly as any of Reed's great works- Transformer, The Blue Mask, New York and Ecstacy, and of course the Velvets! Too many people still think of Reed as the man who wrote Perfect Day and I would recommend this album to any Reed fan or those who think he went nowhere after Transformer. Reed's career is an embarrasment of hidden riches and here's an absolute gem
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on 31 May 2000
This album is a laid back album with moments of humour and also some moments of beauty. There is much to do with drug culture- 'Kicks', for example. 'Crazy feeling' and 'Nobody's business' are good rock songs as is 'Ooooh baby' which appears to be about someone working in a strip bar. There are moments of darkness on the album as you would expect from Reed. The best song here is the title track, which is thoughtful, soulful, and even a little touching. It is a perfect song. In a laid back doo-wop style, Lou sings about isolation ("when you find that you very soul, its been up for sale") and then a possible redemption through love ("remember the princess who lived on the hill, who loved you even though she knew you was wrong"), with Lou ending the album off with the words: "man, I swear I'd give the whole thing up for you."
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