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4.5 out of 5 stars
59
4.5 out of 5 stars
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on 14 August 2017
Sir Tom Courtenay's first major film after Private Potter, also released 1962, and before another British classic, Billy Liar. Great to see John Thaw, in his first film appearance and the incredibly young looking James Bolam who looks too young to shave. Some of the dialogue seems terribly contrived now, with the constant them and us battles getting rather tedious but the cinematography is awesome and it's well worth watching the extra on how the film was made. Not quite as entertaining as Billy Liar, lacking said film's depth of narrative but well worth a place on the shelf if you love English film making.
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on 27 December 2012
I was prompted to buy this after seeing a powerful production in a local theatre. Sensitive updating, excellent acting and impressive athletic strength of the main character made it vibrant, and exciting to watch. The film, in comparison is clearly from the time in which it was written, and a significant part of our culture. I'd recommend it to those with an interest in sport, equality, and British film.
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on 18 May 2009
Tom Courtenay is the archetypal 'Angry Young Man' in this Sixties kitchen sink drama. Made in the heyday of British cinema it is a true classic and arguably the finest of its genre. The disaffection, depression and disenfranchisement of a working-class Northern lad with no prospects apart from poverty or jail, are the cement in a bleak but necessary piece of film-making. With strong support from Michael Redgrave, James Bolam and James Fox, amongst others, this is one of those films you really ought to see at least once. Powerful, emotive and gripping stuff.

The DVD extras on here are pretty good too, as mentioned above. It's worth mentioning that the film is also in its original black and white; hence the DVD cover pictured above.
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on 16 August 2017
one of my all time must see again
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on 10 August 2017
Good film
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on 13 July 2016
I didn't see this when it was first released (too young to get into an X certificate film) but did so a few years later. There was a time when Tony Richardson could do no wrong but that didn't last long. This is now an interesting slice of social history, with some notable early appearances by actors who went on to be very famous. Michael Redgrave was already much respected, of course, and Tom Courtney is still around doing good work. Worth a look, certainly, but don't expect too much.
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on 21 July 2016
Try to find the man who appears briefly on the roof of a factory in one scene. He is not part of the movie but appears on the roof in the background and looks toward the camera for a few seconds. I could give the time of the scene but have another look at the movie and see if you can find him. Not a joke, he can be seen in the shot.
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on 19 September 2012
'SATURDAY NIGHT AND SUNDAY MORNING' ... 'A KIND OF LOVING' ... JOHN OSBORNE'S 'LOOK BACK IN ANGER' ... 'ROOM AT THE TOP'... 'THIS SPORTING LIFE'... 'A TASTE OF HONEY' (BY SHELAGH DELANY AND ASSOCIATED WITH YVONNE LITTLEWOOD'S EAST END THEATRE WORKSHOP) ... 'BILLY LIAR', ALL THESE FORMED THE BASIS OF WHAT WAS KNOWN AS THE KITCHEN SINK MOVEMENT, A STYLE OF DRAMA THAT LED THE WAY FOR BRITISH FILM MAKING DURING THE 1960s. ALWAYS PRODUCED IN ATMOSPHERIC BLACK AND WHITE, THEY SHOWED DOMESTIC LIFE IN THE RAW, AS IT WAS THEN IN THE BIG CITIES OF THE NORTH. LIVERPOOL, FOR EXAMPLE, SET THE SCENE FOR 'A TASTE OF HONEY' AND EVEN INTRODUCED A VERY CARING 'GAY' PLAYED BY MURRAY MELVIN. MY PURCHASE, 'THE LONELINESS OF THE LONG DISTANCE RUNNER', IS CERTAINLY NO EXCEPTION AS IT FITS EXACTLY INTO THAT VEIN. ALBERT FINNEY, ALAN BATES, TOM COUTNEY AND RICHARD HARRIS WERE THE LEADING QUARTET OF ACTORS WHO LED THIS MOVEMENT, EACH GRITTING THEIR TEETH AND HAVING A REBELLIOUS CHIP ON THEIR SHOULDERS, AND ALL SUPPORTED BY A TEAM OF GREAT BRITISH ACTORS -- REDGRAVE, OLIVIER AND BOGARDE TO NAME BUT A FEW, WITH DIRECTORS SUCH AS KAREL REISZ, LINDSAY ANDERSON AND JOHN SCHLESINGER BRILLIANTLY BRINGING THE WRITINGS OF THE LIKES OF STAN BAIRSTOW, ALAN SILLITOE AND DAVID STOREY TO LIFE. LATER CREATIONS LED TO COURTNEY'S OTHER CLASSIC 'BILLY LIAR', LOSEY'S 'THE SERVANT', SCRIPTED BY HAROLD PINTER AFTER HE'D BEEN ABLE TO MAKE 'THE CARETAKER' BY HAVING A WHIP ROUND TO RAISE THE MONEY, POLANSKI'S 'CUL DE SAC' STARRING DONALD PLEASANCE, AND OLIVIER'S 'THE ENTERTAINER'. THERE THEN FOLLOWED YET MORE SOCIAL COMMENT WITH THE LIKES OF 'THE L-SHAPED ROOM', 'POOR COW' AND 'CATHY COME HOME', ALL SET IN A DOWN-TRODDEN LONDON, AND LATER STILL, COLIN WELLAND'S 'KES', A LOW BUDGET CREATION WHICH SHOWED A RETURN TO THE NORTH. BACK THEN I PAID THREE AND SIX TO WATCH THIS STUFF NIGHT AFTER NIGHT AT THE PICTURES. I LOVED IT AS A TEENAGER, PERHAPS BECAUSE I LIKED TO IDENTIFY WITH THE HEROES, AND STILL DO TO A CERTAIN EXTENT! ALL THESE DVDs ARE GENERALLY AVAILABLE (AT A PRICE!), AND EAH ONE TRULY DESERVES ITS RIGHTFUL PLACE ON ANYBODY'S SHELF -- PROPER CLASSICS WHICH CHANGED THE FACE OF THE BRITISH FILM INDUSTRY FOREVER. WONDERFUL MEMORABLE STUFF, AND NOW I'VE JUST ABOUT GOT THE LOT!
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on 22 December 2015
Like A taste of Honey, this was directed by Tony Richardson, and again, I have problems with his sometimes unsubtle direction. Tom Courtney plays the long distance runner, although he runs like Phoebe from Friends. Also, John Thaw is meant to be a young Liverpudlian in the borstal, and god knows what accent it actually sounds like. Courtney gets sent to the borstal for burgling a bakery, and rises through the ranks due to his running prowess. The posh governor of the Borstal is an athletics enthusiast, and treats his charges unequally depending on how fast they run. This inequality is indicative of society and authority, and so when it comes to race day, The Long Distance Runner has a choice to make: whether to win the race as an individual, or stand up for the masses against the governor and the institutional unfairness.
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on 5 March 2017
Exercise
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