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on 16 October 2017
Amazing Tom
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on 2 July 2016
Perfect
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on 22 April 2017
fast - good value, great!
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on 29 July 2017
This was the first Tom Waits album I bought, on vinyl, when it was first released back in 1980. For those new to Waits I would recommend they start here, as the material is more rock orientated than his six previous albums and (maybe) more accessible for some. The album was his last release on the Asylum label and his music following on from here would take new paths and be more experimental in terms of overall sound and production. This was the end of the old Waits' style of piano and string arrangements and the closing of the first act in his musical journey.

The first track is the albums title and is a great opener with it's attacking electric guitar riff matching Waits' growling vocals and lyrics. The following track is an instrumental titled 'In Shades', which seems out of place among the other material with it's drinks lounge/glass clinking background noise but is pleasant enough. Next up is 'Saving All My Love for You', a melancholy ballad with Waits on piano, followed by another rock number 'Downtown'. A change of tack again on 'Jersey Girl', which is a simple love song, perhaps over sentimental, but showing Waits' vocals to good effect – this song was also covered by Bruce Springsteen and is included in his 'Live/1975-1985' three CD set release. Track six is ''Til the Money Runs Out', another rock orientated number followed by a beautiful piano ballad 'On the Nickel', which was originally written for a made-for-television movie of the same name starring Ralph Waite, who played the father in 'The Waltons', who also wrote and produced it. 'Mr. Siegal' is next, with some raunchy guitar playing and the great recurring lyric: “How do the angels get to sleep, When the devil leaves the porch light on”. The closing track is 'Rudy's Arms', which is one of the most moving songs that Tom Waits has written, about the ending of a relationship – but much more than that. It's also about moving on and fresh starts.

A great album and, as stated above, a good starting point for Waits' newbies. If you like the album (and it may take a few plays) then you have to decide whether to listen to his later, more progressive, albums or go back to his earlier work. Whichever path you choose it will be a rewarding journey.
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on 11 April 2015
Brilliant.
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on 2 March 2015
Just the best
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on 13 April 2015
Excellent playlist
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VINE VOICEon 1 September 2007
You might remember, some years ago now, a bizarre Levi's advert with a funeral procession in it and a strange blues track that begins 'Liar Liar, your pants on fire'. That was a Screaming Jay Hawkins cover of the Tom waits track 'Heart Attack and Vine'. An absolutely fantastic white trash blues ramble that pretty much sums up this album.

If 'The Heart of Saturday Night' is the sound of a down-and-out pulling it all together for a late night performance in a jazz club, this is the sound of the morning after. The art work on the cd features Tom Waits' face on a yellowing newspaper and the music sounds like that of someone who has just woken up on a park bench wrapped in this newspaper. It's downbeat blues with the vocals of someone really trying to shake off their hangover.

'Heart Attack and Vine' is superb - so original. 'Downtown' is sleazy blues, 'Til the Money Runs Out' is edgy and paranoid, 'Mr. Siegal' is a drunken brawl waiting to happen. 'On the Nickel' and 'Ruby's Arms' sound like ballads from a Gershwin musical, if Gershwin had ever written anything about tramps in Times Square.

This album bridges the gap between Waits' earlier work and his later experimental output. If you haven't heard much Waits, the closest thing I can think of is the slower, more sentimental, tracks by The Pogues - think 'Fairytale of New York' only spread out across the year rather than just a Christmas song. It's as far from the sanitised output of your average record label as you can get and should be worth a listen on that basis alone...
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on 21 January 2004
i am a huge fan but if you have never heard any Tom Waits ..this is as good an introduction as any. What an underated artist. I have heard/got all of his stuff and as a social/commentary,pertinent observer on alinenation/vignette wizzard/humorist/ wit/
needless to say..do yourself a favour ..just hear a c.d. and hopefully you will agree.
Modern day Oscar Wilde crossed with Jean Genet?
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on 7 September 2014
not s***
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