Shop now Shop now Shop now See more Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
651
4.5 out of 5 stars
Size: Model A|Change
Price:£19.91+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 27 June 2016
So. Where do I start with this review?

I want to preface this review by saying that I was driven to write this review to help women like me make an objective choice.

Most reviews I read for the Mooncup wax lyrical about how environmentally friendly they are and how they prevent sanitary waste in landfill and blah blah eco-warrior type comments.

There is a perception that the Mooncup is a 'hippy' thing that only eco-warriors and activist Vegans wear. As it happens, the only woman I felt confident enough to discuss my choice with was, in fact, an Activist Vegan, and this made me sad: Sad that in this modern age, something that happens every single month is so scarcely discussed and so few women have possession of all the facts and know all of their options!

I wanted to write this review from the perspective of your average, everyday woman. Whilst I care about the environment and recycle diligently, I'm by no stretch of the imagination any kind of eco-warrior, 'hippy', or free-bleeding feminist activist. I'm an average woman who loves leather handbags, works in an office, loves IT, gaming, gardening and my pets.

When I was a teenager, the mooncup was mentioned, briefly, in passing. Our sanitary options were presented as 'Pads and Tampons'. Many MANY women I know have no idea what a menstrual cup even IS, let alone even CONSIDER using one. So if, like me, you are trying to find actual USEFUL reviews, I hope this will help you.

So what prompted me to start looking at the Mooncup in the first place? Comfort. I've reached my 30's - that's over 15 years of monthly menstruation - having never comfortably been able to use Tampons. I can literally count the number of times I have successfully and comfortably used a Tampon on one hand. I hate them. They make me sore, the string rubs, they are dry and uncomfortable and I always feel like they are in the wrong place. So far, I've mainly relied on pads. My fellow women, if you are here for the same reasons I was, it is because you are sick of wearing a nappy for 1 in every 4 weeks. Sick of the sweating, the smell, the never feeling clean no matter how much you wipe, or how many 'Moist toilet wipes' you use.

So I went looking for an alternative to Tampons that could be worn internally to free me from the drudgery of pads. And I found the Mooncup. Actually, I found a bewildering array of cups with names like 'Viva cup', 'Diva Cup', 'Moon cup' etc. To my untrained, inexperienced eye, they all looked the same. The price points varied wildly and the reviews focussed mainly on how amazing it was not to be contributing to landfill... Not the important stuff like 'what it actually FEELS like' and 'what is the difference between this cup and that cup'.

So I narrowed my choices down to the 'top 3' - Diva, Viva and Mooncup. Then, because the reviews didn't help me AT ALL, I thought about who I might know that might actually have a clue. I happen to work with a very vocal activist Vegan. So of everyone I know, I figured she would either know herself or know people she could ask. Turns out, she knew plenty. In her opinion, the Mooncup was the most comfortable. For her, the Diva cup was longer in the body and so less comfortable.

As someone who struggles with Tampons, I decided 'longer in the body' would probably = discomfort for me too, so I decided to err on the side of caution and buy the one my friend and colleague used. If for no other reason than because I had neither the experience or the money to 'take a risk' on something unknown. At least I KNEW someone who used the Mooncup and could give me pointers if I needed them. Turns out, I really didn't. I'm a convert.

First things first: Internal menstrual cups are REALLY not suitable for Hymen-intact virgins. You need to be able to 'handle' yourself with confidence and any barrier affecting the insertion of fingers or items into the Vagina is going to make wearing a mooncup a difficult and likely-painful experience. If you have broken your hymen (either through natural exercise, intercourse, or self pleasure), and are confident inserting tampons and/or other items into your vaginal passage, you should be fine. Sex with a penis is not a pre-requisite of wearing a Mooncup, but I'd definitely say a ruptured hymen is almost essential.

Secondly: I went looking for images on the internet of what I was likely to see when using a Mooncup. Do you know what I found? NOTHING. In a world where 'Rule 34' is a thing and there are ALL KINDS of pornography, I found NOTHING relating to 'In use' Mooncups. I'm not going to lie - it's not a clean experience. If you cannot bear to get menstrual blood on your hands or fingers, you might as well leave now. You WILL get a bit messy. This is inevitable. If you are a tampon user, you will likely be used to a bit of blood on your hands. Using a mooncup is a bit messier than that. If you've ever used Tampons, I'm certain there will have been times when you insert one and it doesn't quite sit right. Instead of discarding it (perhaps because you've only got one, or are running out of time), I'm certain, at some point, you will have popped a finger or two up there to reposition it a bit. This is what it's like to insert a mooncup. You should EXPECT to get menstrual blood and fluid on your hands.

BUT: It's not as bad as you think it's going to be. I always hated pads because I find the smell nauseating. I think a lot of it has to do with this fresh blood sitting around inside a pad in a warm, moist environment. To me, it smells like rotting meat - regardless of how often the pad or tampon is changed. The mooncup is a TOTALLY different experience. The blood and fluid is slightly gelatinous - like egg- white, and for me, there is very little smell beyond the slight tang of blood. This is VASTLY better and actually surprised me a little. I've never seen what menstrual flow actually LOOKS like before: I've always seen the 'absorbed' version. There is a lot less actual BLOOD than you think there will be - it seems to be 50% blood, 50% clear fluid. Sorry if you find this a bit squicky, but this was the information I REALLY WANTED TO KNOW when I was trying to make my decision, so I hope me sharing these details is helpful to you.

The 'messiest' days are (unsurprisingly) the heavy flow days. You will find that the fluid behaves like really stretchy egg white and can be a bit awkward to clean up. But these were the days I valued the freedom of the cup the most! You can always use plenty of soap!

We should not be afraid to discuss this - this is a NATURAL function of our bodies!

Thirdly: When I started looking at Menstrual cups, I assumed the cup sat around the Cervix in a similar way to a contraceptive diaphragm. This is NOT the case. The cup actually sits much lower in the Vagina. In fact, the ridge around the top sits roughly around G-spot area (about as far in as the length of your middle finger). There are two ways to fold it to get it inside - the 'C' fold where you flatten it and fold it in half, and the 'Tulip fold' where you tuck the lip inside and squeeze it into a tulip shape (the Mooncup comes with a booklet explaining these and showing pictures). For me, the Tulip fold works best.

Because it sits relatively low, I found the little 'grippy tube' at the bottom was irritating me. So I cut the whole thing off. I recommend 'trying it on' when you first get it - preferably when you aren't on your period.

Removing a cup to be emptied can be messier than insertion - especially if you accidentally tip it (like I did the second time I tried to clean it). But I find that once removed, I can clean it off with Toilet paper and give it a rinse under the hot tap before re-insertion, and the more you get used to it, the easier and faster the whole process becomes.

I won't lie, I've never actually used a messier form of protection in my life. BUT, for me it feels like I can't believe it's taken me this long to actually find a solution like this! I feel like I'm finally free of waddling around with a pad between my legs, and I have a viable alternative to the discomfort of the tampon. Even if you don't get on with it, for me, just trying it was worth every penny! I'm so glad I kept an open mind! I'm prepared to trade off a little bit of blood on my fingers for the comfort and freedom I have with this device.

So, once the cup is in, I usually run my finger around the rim to make sure it 'popped back into shape' correctly (or you will leak). Remember how when you insert a Tampon you have to be careful not to tug on the string? Yeah, not an issue with a Mooncup. It's ridiculously comfortable. I literally cannot feel the cup or ridge at all. Once you find the right seating position for the cup, and cut the little 'gripper tube' to the right length (or totally off), it feels even LESS invasive than a Tampon. I always find I can feel tampons, but the mooncup body is made of Silicon (you know, the same stuff you can find in almost any modern kitchen - muffin cases, jelly moulds, loaf 'tins' which seems crazy to me - you'll cook with Silicon but still prefer to shove wads of cotton inside your body?), with a firmer silicon 'ring'. So the whole thing moves and conforms to your internal contours. It doesn't absorb anything so you never feel chaffed or dry. There are little holes around it to aid in forming a seal with the vaginal walls - these WILL fill with 'gunk'. Sorry but it's true. A Rinse under the tap usually clears it right out, though.

As with anything, when you have a foreign object in the vagina, you may feel the effect of it - for me, I find there is a slight sensation of 'something' against the front wall. It's not uncomfortable, just 'THERE'. In fact, it is vastly more comfortable than wearing Tampons and TOTALLY worth not having to wear a pad!

I've only just started using mine, so I find that I feel more confident pairing the cup with a thin Panty liner - so far this has not proven to be necessary. But considering I'm on a heavy flow day and all I'm wearing is a thin liner, I'm ecstatic!

Because it's not made of cotton, and the menstrual flow is held in a natural state (as opposed to being absorbed into fabric), there is much much less risk of toxic shock syndrome. For the first time in my life, I wore an internal sanitary device to bed. It was wonderful - I slept much more comfortably than I usually would! I wore a pad (again, first time so I'm getting used to it and learning to trust it), but I didn't need to worry about the pad slipping, or 'tucking it in' to make sure it doesn't leak. I woke up clean and leak-free and fell in love with my menstrual cup a little bit more.

I tried to talk about my cup with my Mother and Sister, and they looked at me like I'd gone insane. My sister is disgusted by the concept and my mother had never heard of them. This needs to change. If, like me, you are just an average woman looking for a tampon alternative with no agenda other than your own comfort, please add your own reviews and experiences to the voices on here. Being ecologically friendly is one of many reasons to use a mooncup, and whilst it is a noble one, I don't think there are enough voices championing the personal benefits of the device.

As for me, I took the plunge and opened my mind to use something that has unfairly been stereotyped as a 'hippy device', and already I can see that it has improved my menstrual experience no end! I'm free of pads and tampons, you can wear it to swim and exercise, and because of the decreased risk of Toxic shock, you can wear it for longer periods.

Yes, at around £20, it represents a sizable cost for a single sanitary device. BUT, since it's reusable, I've already saved at least £4 in pads I haven't needed to wear. Within 4 months it will have paid for itself.

As an aside, you will also find mention of the Menstrual cup among women trying to get pregnant - either using donor sperm, or as a method of 'keeping it in' after intercourse. It's a silicone cup - use it however you want. As long as you keep it clean and store it properly you can be confident using it however you want.
0Comment| 70 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 17 May 2015
The first time you use a Mooncup (or any menstrual cup) can feel a) like you've been sucker-punched in the fanny and/or b) that a tiny, sharp-clawed alien has taken up residence in your hoochie. But - don't let this put you off! Come on - you've probably been through worse (gynae exams; cystitis; thrush; insensitive lovers; childbirth (for those using the larger size) - and, let's face it, nothing assaults your fandango quite like a baby punching its way out! So - go into this knowing YOU CAN DO IT. Or if you can't at least you gave it your best shot and it's a tale to tell your granddaughters some dark stormy night 20 years from now.

Going forward, I'm going to refer to any menstrual cup - because there are tons out there (which I hadn't realised when I picked up my first Mooncup at Boots). So if one type doesn't suit you, another might. The reason I'm giving the Mooncup a 3 (any cup for that matter) is because they take time for a lot of people to adjust to. But if you can get used to them, the benefits are huge - putting them up to a 5. They work out a lot cheaper in the long run because they can be re-used for years (some of you will hit the menopause having not needed to buy a replacement!); they avoid the risk of toxic shock; they're environmentally friendly (if that's something you're concerned about); unlike tampons, they can be used before your period starts - so are a great safety barrier; they fantastic if you're travelling; and they do work. The reason I started using one (and stop reading if you aren't ready for a TMI moment!) is because my periods had become heavier for some reason and, of a night, I had had a bit of fallout. Since using a cup, this has never happened. So those are just some of the plus-points.

The negative is that while many people love these in theory, they can't get on with them in practice - which would make them 1 star for those people. Out of all the products on Amazon, this is the one thing that's difficult to do an objective review on because it's so personal. So here are my tips (from my own learning curve)

1) Don't necessarily expect to get on with a cup immediately, It can take a bit of determination to find what works for you
2) If you are not comfortable touching your own privvies, then don't even think about one of these
3) If you can't handle seeing liquid blood in a cup - move on. You need to not be squeamish because there will come a point when you need to extract the cup, full of its contents, and wash it out.
4) If you can't get on with the Mooncup, try another brand. The Comfy Cup is actually a lot softer and more comfortable. It's also wayyyy cheaper - so if you can't get going with it, you've only spent about £7.99. If you're starting out, I'd recommend going with the Comfy Cup first (you can get them on Amazon too)
5) Experiment with trimming the end. Again, the Comfy Cup is good for this because if you ruin it (as I just did by eventually cutting a hole in mine!) you're not £20 down! Regarding the end, I actually think that trimming it could cause its own issues. When I first used the Comfy Cup, I thought it was much better than the Mooncup - I was sort of aware of the end though (which is a bit thick). I trimmed it and then found it chaffed. If the edge isn't exactly smooth (and it's difficult to ensure it is), then this can almost be more irritating. In a way, I wish they'd make them with two options - with a tab and without a tab. Some people might be afraid that if they cut the tab, they won't be able to pull their cup out - but don't worry. While it's true that you need to be okay putting your digits inside yourself to retrieve these, you'll still need to do this even with a tab (because you need to break the seal). It can't get lost either - if you're struggling to remove, just bear down - like giving birth or doing a poops! So, trimming might or might not work for you - but if you're going to experiment, do it on the cheapest cup first.
6) Use the punch-down fold - it's far easier. If you've done any research on these cups, you probably already know about the different ways of folding them prior to insertion - if not, a quick Youtube search will show you.
7) Now here's something I've only recently found out that MADE ALL THE DIFFERENCE ... after you've done your punch-down fold, make sure you insert the cup with the longer side upwards. You wouldn't think it ought to make a difference, as once it's inside you, it opens up into the same shape whatever. However, it does make a difference. I've used a cup for months now and always been vaguely aware of it. I've sort of put up with it because I like the security of it. However, it's been like a vague irritation (again, partly, I think, because of the jagged trimmed end). Recently though, I tried inserting it with the longer smooth edge of the punch-down fold upright and it just seemed to position it better and make it comfier. I now can't feel it.
8) If you can't get on with a cup during the day, don't necessarily give up on it for night time. Like I say, I was vaguely irritated with the cup mainly when walking - but couldn't feel it when sitting or lying down. In fact, the act of lying down can help it get into a better position (you could even try rotating your hips and lying on your front after inserting it for daytime use). So if you have a heavy flow and struggle going through tampons in the night, then maybe just use a cup of a bedtime.
9) Do your research - this is something new for most people. There are tons of different cups out there. A brilliant website is Menstrual Cup Reviews Net (http://menstrualcupreviews.net/) which compares all different types. The newest cup - The Lily Cup compact folds down for storage - so length can be adjusted. I haven't tried it but it looks very soft and really narrows at the tip; so less intrusive. Another great source of information is Precious Stars Pads (both site and youtube). She's only 16 but is a wealth of knowledge.
10) Don't give up first time! If you can get the hang of these, they're great. And I do rate the Mooncup - it's very reliable and a fantastic product. But if you don't like this one, then maybe experiment with the Comfy Cup too.

Good luck with it!
44 comments| 308 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 February 2015
Absolutely tremendous, life-changer. I confess I have been hesitating for the past year, should I buy and take the chance? I've read so many good reviews, but at the same time I was kind of anxious of trying a new method, being so used with tampons and sanitary pads... I will divide in pros and cons, although for me the cons are not so negative points, but some features that some women may note me so willing to embrace.
PROS:
-You don't feel it. It's the truth, you forget you're with your period!
-More ecological and educated choice.
-One-time purchase and you're good for years of sanitary protection, so more economic choice.
-You get more familiarized with your own body and fluids, so it can contribute in a positive way for your self-esteem.
-If well inserted (i.e., if there is a seal) there are absolutely no leaks. Yay for white pants with your period!
-Totally safe material, no risks for your health.

CONS:
-You have to be "at ease" and to know your body to be comfortable enough to try this. For the first times, you'll have to insert, remove and re-insert a couple of times just to be sure the stem is the right length, so you'll need to "feel" with your finger, well, inside you. And this I know it's not everyone who is comfortable enough to do so. Not a problem, but maybe you should rethink your choice. If (like me) your vaginal canal is long, this can mean you'll have to insert your fingers well up high to grab the base of the cup, and this is something to consider.
-The removal process can be kind of awkward. You'll have to press the base of the cup while you pull from one side, and then the other. And you'll have to be relaxed. If you're not calm and relaxed the muscles of your vagina will tense up and it will get more difficult to get the cup out. The good thing is that the cup is made from a totally safe medical silicone, so no worries there (it's not like the awful chemicals they put on tampons). Just wait another 15 or 30 minutes and try again when you're calmer.

All in all, for me it has been a lifesaver, I can only ask myself why on earth didn't I buy this sooner?... I cannot recommend this enough for women and girls who are comfortable with their body and intimacy.
0Comment| 35 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 August 2013
I've had this product now for 25 months so I think I have enough experience of it to have my twopenneth-worth.

I fully understand that we can't go on producing waste at the rate that we do, and that nappies and sanitary pads/tampons make up a massive proportion of this waste, so I decided to do my bit. I did my research and checked out the Mooncup website, read all the fantastic reviews and parted with my £21 at Boots.

I won't disgust you with the gory details in full, but will provide you with my findings (which were not acceptable on the Mooncup website - not positive enough, it seems :-(

1) The product is totally reusable

2) Cleaning it is easy (I use the baby-bottle sterilising fluid-method, although not sure this is good for my internal parts; the boiling-in-a-pan kept expressly only for the Mooncup did seem a little excessive/expensive

3) When staying close to home, the clean up of the cup was easy, although cleaning it in a public toilet where the sink is in the communal part of the toilet rather than inside the toilet cubicle could be problematic, to say the least. (You can buy wipes for the cup, but surely this is counterproductive to the green philosophy?)

4) I leaked, I leak and am sure I will continue to leak whilst using the cup. I know how to insert it having read the instructions a dozen times, yet getting the position right is a very hit-and-miss affair (more miss than hit unfortunately). How women state they wore white trousers whilst Mooncupping is beyond me. But maybe it's just me

5) Many women reported that they suffered cystitis whilst using tampons. For me, I never did experience tampon-related cystitis, but experienced Mooncup-related cystitis which, I believe could well be due to my removal of said cup. Pulling or dragging down on the stem/bottom of the cup seemed to cause internal trauma; you really need to perfect the release-of-the-seal-technique for comfortable removal or boy, will you pay for it

6) It's messy; getting up-close-and-personal with your own bodily fluids is a steep learning curve but one which is worth learning. You do get used to (literally) handling your own waste and it soon becomes less of an issue than it once was. Perhaps remove any white bathroom mats surrounding the toilet, too, for convenience-sake

7) The cost is prohibitive but an initial layout worth paying since once you have spent it, the Mooncup is free (perhaps invest in some washable pads which is an avenue I am pursuing currently; I don't think anyone would feel totally safe 100% of the time, especially in the beginning)

If you want to make the green choice, or just do your bit to reduce waste, go for it. I'm still using mine, after two years. I don't rely on it solely; I don't feel guilty for switching to tampons if I'm out and about. I just use it when and where I feel appropriate. I'm glad I bought it, I'd say definitely give it a try.
33 comments| 152 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 January 2009
I wish I'd known that this product existed years ago. If you're fed up with leaky tampons then consider this product. When I saw an advert for the Mooncup, I thought 'what a fabulous idea' and bought one. I've never looked back and haven't bought a tampon since, so you'll soon get your money's worth.

Don't get me wrong, the Mooncup is NOT for everybody. It's really messy to insert and take out, because although there is a 'stem' (the long thin bit at the bottom), you will probably get a pair of scissors and cut it off as it's not comfortable. So, to insert the Mooncup, it takes a bit of practice - and there is a knack to it. You have 2 ways of folding it, then you have to keep it folded while inserting, then it springs into place and FORMS A SEAL. It won't leak unless it gets full and then it will leak and so I usually wear a pad on my heaviest days in case of leakage. To take the mooncup out, you have to squeeze the bottom of the cup to RELEASE THE SEAL, and then you can remove it and empty it, give it a rinse and re-insert. Don't just tug on it (as I did the first time) you MUST release the seal. You can see it will take a bit of getting used to and it is very messy. I know some women won't get on with this at all, but if you're 'au fait' with this area, go ahead and try it.

Advantages:
Financially better than tampons. It forms a seal, so you can have a bath or go swimming with it in and be reasonably confident about not leaking. It can stay in for up to 8 hours and there is NO chance of toxic shock, as this is only associated with tampons - caused by the remnants of fibres they leave inside. (The Mooncup is silicone and leaves no traces of anything inside). Don't forget - the environmental advantages!!! No flushing tampons down the loo.

Disadvantages:
You should sterilise it between uses (I just leave it in boiling water for a while). It IS really messy, so you need to be able to wash your hands before and after using it (ie, you need to have access to a toilet with a wash basin) - but don't you have to do this with tampons anyway?. Takes a bit of time to get used to inserting and taking it out - please persevere though. If full, it will still leak, so may have to wear a pad on heavier days.

Can I also just add, if you put the mooncup in too far, it will be a little uncomfortable. In the same way, if you don't put it in far enough it will be uncomfortable. It needs to sit just past the pubic bone, so the stem will definitely need to be cut off. Also, sometimes it doesn't spring into place properly and a few minutes later you can get a strange sensation of it pinging into place (forming the seal). All these things take getting used to and I hope they don't put women off. It all takes practice and I do hope you will persevere because I absolutely love this product and would never EVER go back to tampons...!

In conclusion, I love it. Great product.
22 comments| 160 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 November 2009
I wish I'd known that this product existed years ago. If you're fed up with leaky tampons then consider this product. When I saw an advert for the Mooncup, I thought 'what a fabulous idea' and bought one. I've never looked back and haven't bought a tampon since, so you'll soon get your money's worth.

Don't get me wrong, the Mooncup is NOT for everybody. It's really messy to insert and take out, because although there is a 'stem' (the long thin bit at the bottom), you will probably get a pair of scissors and cut it off as it's not comfortable. So, to insert the Mooncup, it takes a bit of practice - and there is a knack to it. You have 2 ways of folding it, then you have to keep it folded while inserting, then it springs into place and FORMS A SEAL. It won't leak unless it gets full and then it will leak and so I usually wear a pad on my heaviest days in case of leakage. To take the mooncup out, you have to squeeze the bottom of the cup to RELEASE THE SEAL, and then you can remove it and empty it, give it a rinse and re-insert. Don't just tug on it (as I did the first time) you MUST release the seal. You can see it will take a bit of getting used to and it is very messy. I know some women won't get on with this at all, but if you're 'au fait' with this area, go ahead and try it.

Advantages:
Financially better than tampons. It forms a seal, so you can have a bath or go swimming with it in and be reasonably confident about not leaking. It can stay in for up to 8 hours and there is NO chance of toxic shock, as this is only associated with tampons - caused by the remnants of fibres they leave inside. (The Mooncup is silicone and leaves no traces of anything inside). Don't forget - the environmental advantages!!! No flushing tampons down the loo.

Disadvantages:
You should sterilise it between uses (I just leave it in boiling water for a while). It IS really messy, so you need to be able to wash your hands before and after using it (ie, you need to have access to a toilet with a wash basin) - but don't you have to do this with tampons anyway?. Takes a bit of time to get used to inserting and taking it out - please persevere though. If full, it will still leak, so may have to wear a pad on heavier days.

Can I also just add, if you put the mooncup in too far, it will be a little uncomfortable. In the same way, if you don't put it in far enough it will be uncomfortable. It needs to sit just past the pubic bone, so the stem will definitely need to be cut off. Also, sometimes it doesn't spring into place properly and a few minutes later you can get a strange sensation of it pinging into place (forming the seal). All these things take getting used to and I hope they don't put women off. It all takes practice and I do hope you will persevere because I absolutely love this product and would never EVER go back to tampons...!

In conclusion, I love it. Great product.
33 comments| 135 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 July 2016
I've had a love hate relationship with my cup! The first time I used it it was traumatic - couldn't get it in and then couldn't get it out! But I have really heavy periods and hate wearing tampons which almost always dry me out. Pads at night are a big no because I hate wearing knickers to bed plus the pads cause rashes. So I heard about the mooncup and thought I'd try it out. After persevering with it I now love it. I'm not going to lie - it's a LOT more messier than tampons or pads and I didn't realise how sticky menstrual blood is but it's oddly fascinating! Don't use if your hymen is still intact - it'll hurt like hell!
I've added a (gross - sorry!) photo because surprisingly it's so hard to find one online!
review image
0Comment| 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 January 2015
I'm afraid this review has ended up really long, I think it's providing me with catharsis for an altogether physically and emotionally traumatic experience. Just skip to the last paragraph if you want my conclusion.

I bought my Mooncup about four years ago now, but have noticed a new wave of enthusiasm lately so thought I would share my own experience for balance. The Mooncup initially sounded like a pretty good idea, and people were really raving about it; it sounded ethical, sensible and healthy. So I parted with £20, feeling that I was not only doing my bit for the earth and my own body but was perhaps part of a product revolution.

On advice I bought the small Mooncup, yet I was still horrified on opening the box. To clarify, I'm not squeamish, and as I was 30 at the time I'd been sexually active for a good while. Still, to have a massive plastic jug stuck up my pipes for the duration of my 'moon time' (seriously? Moon time? Is that actually a thing? I can think of many less misleading euphemisms) was daunting to say the least. The size of the thing! No jokes about my partner here, suffice to say he does not permanently reside inside me when I'm going about my daily business.

Not to be dissuaded (I spent twenty quid!) I carefully read the instructions. However, the installation process was decidedly unglamorous. Oh god, let's be honest, it was so awful I am getting flashbacks. The cup is actually pretty rigid. The instructions show you to fold one side of the cup in to make it smaller, poke it up your nethers, let it unfurl and off you go skydiving or whatever. But unfurl is not really the word. That conjures images of newly born butterflies opening their delicate wings. No, it violently pops open, punching you right in the flipping vagina. Oof. And I obviously hadn't positioned it right, as although I swear there was nowhere else for it to actually go (I'm a lady with a two way road, not a spaghetti junction) the cup was really uncomfortable for the next half an hour and leaked to boot. I was mortified and sore and could bear it no longer, so with some internal noises very similar to those in the zombie section of the BBC horror sound effects CD I removed the contraption until I felt sufficiently brave enough to try again.

The time came a few days later (well, it did cost £20). I figured part of the problem was that the stick on the end was too long and maybe chafing a bit. So I cut an inch off it, as suggested on the website. This time the process went a little better, or so I thought. Until it somehow went sideways after ten minutes and squashed up with the now shorter stick wedged into my insides. Yeah, I don't know how that happened either, the instructions suggest it is impossible. But I couldn't get it out. I tried and tried and ended up on the floor crying. I finally got free, but was tender and bruised...and was bleeding more than just from my 'moon flow'.

Next month, on my first 'moon day' (sorry, that never stops being funny) I steeled myself and I tried again (it was twenty whole flipping pounds!). I had cut the stick off the bottom completely by now, apparently many people prefer that and I did not want to impale myself like last time. I installed the massive great beast of a cup, waited for the familiar vagina-punch as it unrolled, shoogled it about a bit desperately to get a seal and yes! It actually seemed secure, so I went to roller derby training. No, I really did (though admittedly with secondary precautions in place, I'm not crazy). But I could feel it the whole time...it was horrible, it felt like a big solid lump - not painful, but uncomfortable and very definitely just...there. In fairness, it half did the job it was supposed to do, but I was glad of the secondary precautions. Unfortunately when I got home I discovered that I'd sealed it so very well I couldn't get it out. It was stuck fast. Because I'd cut the stick off there was nothing to grip, and it was suctioned in like something Ripley might have encountered on her space travels. Panic set in after thirty minutes of grappling with the thing on the bathroom floor. I tried all the suggested courses of action in the instructions, on the website, and finally with a Google search beginning 'HELP'. I ran a bath and grappled some more. Still panicking. Should I call NHS online? Casualty? Luckily after three hours I managed to give birth to the thing, but I was once again very sore and kind of embarrassed that I'd wasted a whole night physically fighting with my feminine hygiene solution.

The same thing happened the next few times. The horrid thing got stuck. It pinched and scratched as I had to fish around in my own body, crying and generally feel every shred of dignity gallop away from me. In finally releasing it each time I was thoroughly reminded of my 'moon time' because I was fair covered in the evidence, as was the entire bathroom. My final attempt to use the Mooncup was followed by a bout of brutal trauma related cystitis, and suffice to say after five months of really trying (TWENTY QUID) to get to grips with it I have never tried again.

A lot of women seem to love it. I can't fathom out why their experiences were so different to my own, but I can't see how a large, not terribly flexible plastic bucket inserted into your delicate lady area can ever be comfortable or practical. The Mooncup is a medieval torture device, punishing me for daring to have a double X chromosome and ensuring I don't leave the house for the duration of my 'moon time'. It would take me two years to use twenty pounds' worth of equivalent sanitary products, so it is not especially good value as I certainly couldn't trust it enough to rely on it as a sole solution. Nor could I ever imagine servicing it in a public place, or my stepmother's pristine cream bathroom. Suggesting you boil it in its very own saucepan is ludicrous; 'oh no darling, you've put your soup into my mooncup pan'. Frankly the whole thing is up there with the femidom in terms of revolutionary women's products. It's not empowering, it's not practical, it's not even particularly earth friendly all things considered. It's just plain awful.
1515 comments| 90 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 December 2015
I first heard about Mooncup 16 years ago but assumed it would be messy, impractical, uncomfortable, difficult to use and therefore too risky to waste money on. I then forgot all about it. My periods have since got heavier and when I came across Mooncup again, I bought one out of sheer desperation. (Fed up with carrying around loads of tampons and panty liners, changing every few hours & still bleeding into my underwear/ clothes.) What a waste of 16 years! I was a complete convert after 1 day. To my utter amazement I did not struggle with inserting / removing it (practice obviously helps). I have found it less messy, more practical/ comfortable & easier to use than tampons. I have not risked using it in unfamiliar public toilets (yet) but did manage with it at work – though my intention had only ever been to use it at home. I have never reviewed anything before and probably never will again (too lazy). Other people’s reviews gave me the courage to try Mooncup so I felt I should do my bit. I did not believe some of the reviews but I now understand the sense of liberation others spoke of. I no longer spend every moment worrying about the state of my underwear/ whether I should go to the toilet to check. (I didn’t even realise I did this until I changed to Mooncup… and didn’t do it anymore!)
0Comment| 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 March 2009
After 20 years of using tampons, this product has literally been a revelation to me. So much less messy, and so flexible - I love the fact that I now have no need to worry about flushing away or finding a dispenser for those nasty used 'items' for a week every month. It can be left in for 8-12 hours, which I like if I'm out and about for the whole day; and reused for years, which is good if you're travelling in places that don't have regular supplies of these items. And it also makes night times a whole lot more relaxing.

It took me one or two goes to get used to using it. Since then I have found it ridiculously easy to use - identical to a tampon really. I will admit, however, that once I had cut the stem off, as instructed in the packaging, I panicked the first time I tried to take it out, until I had got the hang of using my pelvic floor muscles to move it into an 'out' position. I recommend reading the Mooncup website for advice, if you struggle the first time.

You can't feel it at all when its in place, by the way.

I thoroughly recommend that you throw away your towels and tampons and invest in one of these straight away.

I'm not a member of the green lobby - I work in the City and regard myself as very picky about appearances and brands. I just think this product is a MUCH better alternative to anything else that's out there.

Don't be nervous or put off. Go for it!
0Comment| 61 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.
See all 25 answered questions


Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)