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4.7 out of 5 stars
94
4.7 out of 5 stars
Seventh Sojourn
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£5.32+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 8 March 2014
After a string of highly consistent releases, Seventh Sojourn sees the Moody Blues starting to struggle for new and innovative ways to express themselves. This is not a bad album; quite simply, it is just not as interesting as its predecessors. John Lodge's 'Isn't Life Strange' is certainly one of the more memorable tracks here but 'I'm Just A Singer In a Rock And Roll Band' feels like going through the motions. Unsurprisingly, the group took an extended break after this 1972 release (having released 7 albums in under 6 years) and returned somewhat refreshed.

My favourite Moody Blues album is 'For Our Children's Children's Children' (1969) which is a gloriously heady mix of psychedelia and whimsy and I would recommend that album as a good starting point for your voyage of discovery.
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on 9 July 2017
Good as a replacement go anywhere album
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on 17 June 2017
The Moody Blues. They can do no wrong.
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on 13 May 2017
makes me moody
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on 25 October 2017
As described
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on 2 August 2017
Relaxing ...got every one of their albums..
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on 23 August 2017
Came early new disc great price 10/10
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on 5 April 2017
Perfect in every way...
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on 21 April 2007
Seventh Sojourn was the first LP I bought with my own money..I was 15 at the time in 1972;and so it remains to this day my favourite.This reissue is like meeting an old friend and noticing something new,the instrumental bonus tracks give an insight into how the band worked but best of all you can sing along at home and be a Moody Blue!(go on you know you want to!)

This is the Moodies most accomplished but not their most inspired album.It is certainly the last great one,with `that sound`,and this versions greatest moment is without a doubt Pinder`s instrumental bridge on the original version of Isn`t Life Strange...I am not kiding.. I actually had a tear in my eye when I first heard this...I really believe there will be Mellotrons in Heaven!
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VINE VOICEon 11 August 2010
I can imagine many long-time Moody Blues fans disagreeing, but for me this is their best album. Like Pink Floyd's 'Dark Side of the Moon', 'Seventh Sojourn' sounds as if it could have been made much later than te early 1970s. The band's previous six albums were superbly crafted, but this one sounds as if the recording technology had been updated by a decade or two. Possibly, the addition of the chamberlain had something to do with it.

It isn't just the production that makes this so good, however, as the material is almost uniformly brilliant. 'You and Me' and 'The Land of Make Believe' fall below the standard of the rest, but not by much. There are perhaps glimpses in the lyrics that the band were becoming more sentimental, their fixation with concepts having apparently waned, but this suits what is a more sensual body of music. Mike Pinder's opener, 'Lost in a Lost World' possesses a bewitching shimmer, something that recurs on several tracks. Justin Hayward's 'New Horizons' too is a masterpiece. Ray Thomas, as ever, provides a song that's out of character with the rest of the album, a love homage akin to a shanty which is nevertheless exquisite and dignified. It forms a useful interlude before John Lodge's beautiful 'Isn't Life Strange', which seems to serve as the centrepiece. 'You and Me' suffers a little from following it, but its higher tempo prevents it from being totally shaded. Pinder's 'When You're a Free Man' is wonderfully eerie and the fast 'I'm Just a Singer...' is the perfect choice for a showstopping climax.

The bonus tracks are of good quality, but as is usually the case, the only one of major interest is the one which isn't an alternative version of one of the previous tracks. Great album though.
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