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Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
161
4.3 out of 5 stars
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£7.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


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on 17 May 2017
great Christmas present, and well worth the money
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on 23 May 2017
Nice.
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on 16 May 2017
A+
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on 13 April 2017
amazing
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on 7 March 2017
Beautiful album and sounds great on vinyl! Fast delivery as well.
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on 5 May 2017
alt-country must have!
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on 8 August 2017
Superb, atmospheric, moving. A great album!
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on 25 October 2013
Absolutely one of the albums everyone should have. Etherial and both heartwarming and refreshing as the icy winter morning that the cover art evokes an image of.
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on 8 October 2009
First listen poor music BUT listen 2 or 3 times more and it just grows and grows on you. Compulsive listening.
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on 6 September 2015
Like no doubt thousands of young guys and girls during the late 00's, I got my heart broken to the soundtrack of Bon Iver. I was an undergraduate at university, and as Nick Hornby in High Fidelity observed, it was hard to tell what came first - was I miserable because I loved Bon Iver, or did I love Bon Iver because I was miserable? Did my enjoyment of the album instil in me a subconscious desire to experience the same things Justin Vernon sang about, draped in eerie harmonies, clicks and scrapes, to run the same gamut of emotions, or was it simply catharsis with the pain that he sings so vividly and almost tangibly about that drew me in closer to the warm tones? Regardless, the album For Emma, Forever Ago brings back powerful, if unrefined, emotions. The peculiar flavour of heartbreak, with its delicate, absolute and all-consuming awfulness and despair is a memory that I think we can all remember or at least empathise with. And it's at its most beautiful in songs like Skinny Love, re:stacks and Blindsided, (and Beach Baby from the LP, Blood Bank) songs of anger, mourning, shock, pain, loss, sadness, and ultimately, by the end of the album, acceptance and redemption. It's an intense experience that draws the listener in and confronts them with raw emotion, exposing their own feelings.

On a more personal level, this was the first album for me that addressed love and loss in such an oblique manner ('there's a black crow sitting across from me; his wiry legs are crossed / And he's dangling my keys, he even fakes a toss' is only one example of many) so as, counter intuitively, to make it seem more genuine, free from what I perceived to be the clichés of songs about heartbreak. Undoubtably the rich use of metaphor, the true impart of the songs wrapped up tightly in the words and sounds rather than overtly on display was a big part of why I liked it so much. It's a deeper album that rewards careful listening on a quiet Saturday night, and although student me devoured it, it's not a self-indulgent piece of navel-gazing only fit for those inexperienced in love - to assume that would be to miss out on something truly special. It's a beautifully crafted paean to the experience of loss, a timeless part of the universal experience of the human condition.
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