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3.8 out of 5 stars
9
3.8 out of 5 stars
You Dont Know - Ninja Cuts
Format: Audio CD|Change
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on 28 January 2011
In spite of the label's recent inclination towards rap and hip hop, this compilation reminds you that Ninjatune do put out a wide variety of music from many talented artists. It's nice to see that this compilation is not dominated by rap and the tracks they have included from that genre should appeal to listeners who generally prefer their other artists.

Having said that, I would recommend that a newcomer to Ninjatune looks further back to compilations such as "Funkungfusion" and "Xen Cuts" for a better introduction to what the label is all about and where it came from. Depending on your taste, you may also enjoy material released under their sister label, Solid Steel. Not necessarily offering the same musical styles as Ninjatune but the musical influences are broadly similar.
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on 19 January 2009
I really love this compilation. It's a great guide to the music of the Ninja Tune label. I added quite a few albums to my wish list after listening to this. This is a must buy, particularly if you like quality electronic and hip-hop music.
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on 26 January 2014
Listen, I love Ninja tunes so it may sound weird to think that I slagged them off, but, in my world of original music and deep underground appreciation I was nothing short of pissed when I got this. Why? Let me break it down....

1) IT HAS A MIXTURE OF TRACKS THAT DOES NOT WORK TOGETHER
2) IT HAS TOO MUCH GRIMEY CRAP ON THERE
3) IT HAS FORGOTTEN WHAT BEING TRUE IS
4) I ACTUALLY HAD TO TAKE IT BACK AS IT WASN'T WHAT I AM USED TO

If I wanted to listen to aggressive s***e I would get crunked and wack on Dizzy Rascal or Tiny Tempah. I don't roll like that though. I like to think that my pallet is one of sophistication and smart sounds. This has sold out to the commercial groups of bellends that like to act hard and then to make matters worse, they throw in Classics like the cinematic orchestra. Hardly a sublime collection or journey for me to kick back with. I love some artists and I understand that music moves on, but, never the less I know my music and for me it just got on my wick.

Sorry for those fresh young kids out there that love their dubstep and grime but it was far too hard and tough for my liking. Less emotion and more throw away aggression.

If you love the old Ninja style and labels like Warp, Tru Thoughts, Mo Wax, IK7, Wall of sound or any other originallabel. This should be called MO WACK! Sorry guys!
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on 14 March 2008
The dropping of a multi-CD compilation by Ninja Tune or Big Dada is big news. So many of their previous compilation albums have become revered classics that music lovers go back to time and time again. Who can forget releases like `Zen Cuts' (possibly one of the greatest compilations released), `Funkungfusion' and the more recent `Well Deep: 10Yrs of Big Dada'. The classic status of these releases is not purely gained by the quality and eccentricity of the artists on the label's rosters, but thanks to the rarities and remixes that adorn these compilations.

Blowing all previous notions of your typical compilation album out of the window and surpassing even their own high standards, Ninja Tune has served up this fantastic 49track 3CD compilation. Acting as a barometer to the state of alternative off-kilter music in 2008, the compilation serves as a signpost of where the label has come from and where it's heading. Spanning across the three labels, Ninja Tune, Big Dada and Counter Records, this compilation has something for anyone interested in interesting music, be it hip-hop, psychadelic rock, cut'n'paste, drum'n'bass, dancehall, electronica or just plain sonic weirdness. Famous names like Roots Manuva, Coldcut, Amon Tobin, RJD2 and Mr Scruff rub shoulders with (currently) lesser known names such as The Long Lost, Ghislain Poirier, Max & Harvey, Loka and John Matthias in a compilation that will have you constantly reaching for the tracklisting.

There are surprises lurking around each corner from the kaleidoscopic psyche-rock of Pop Levi to the explicit porncore laced electronica of Spank Rock to the twisted neo-funk to The Heavy. Like hip-hop? Well you're in luck with top cuts from both sides of the Atlantic including the quirky ramblings of King Geedorah, the crazed stylings of TTc, the old skool mash-up of DJ Shadow, the avant-hop of Clouddead, the wisdom spittage of Ty and the future grime of Wiley. Many of these tracks are remixes which give an interesting slant on the originals and which in most cases can't be found anywhere else. A true standout track is `Fear the Labour' by One Self. Comprised of St Petersburg-born Ninja Tune turntable stalwart DJ Vadim, New York rapper Blu Rum 13, and Yarah Bravo, the trio engage in a bout of top-draw hip-hop which sees a manipulated Middle Eastern melody snake over a bottomless bass groove whilst Blu Rum 13 spits consciously overtop.

Dig deeper into the compilation and you'll uncover some thumping beats. Modeselektor carves out a gargantuan stompathon remix of Ghislain Poirier whilst Warrior Queen spits conspicuously on The Bug's contemporised old-skool bashment mash-up, `Poison Dart'. Echoing Pendulum's rock influenced d'n'b, The Qemists burst out with a floor-quaking slice of electro underpinned by a deep Jungle groove. Fans of old-skool drum'n'bass will be in for a treat, because, stepping straight-out from the halcyon days of melodic drum'n'bass where acts like E-Z Rollers and 4Hero dominated the rave scene is Bonobo's `Nightlife'. Reconstructed by bass-heads `Zero DB' and featuring the silky harmonized vocals of Bajka, the track carves out a fresh, contemporised play on the old-skool d'n'b dynamics with its deep rolling basslines, hypnotic melodics and constantly unfurling crisp beats. Moving further on into the compilation sees Coldcut prove that they still have their finger on the pulse with the hypnotic Clint Mansell-esque techno of `Just for the Kick'. The Tiga remix of their `Walk A Mile In My Shoes' also coasts captivatingly with a menacing techno groove.

Staying true to their tradition of putting out the finest music, regardless of genre, the compilation also features some wonderful offerings by acts from more specialist genres. Loka are on hand to provide a dash of exotic jazz fused electronica while Max & Harvey provide an explosive soundtrack of atmospheric noir-ish jazzscapes coupled with elongated female vocals to create a sound reminiscent of early Goldfrapp fused with early Cinematic Orchestra. The Cinematic Orchestra themselves provide both a live track and a remix by Leaf label ambience guru Susumu Yokota. Jaga's contribution towards the end of the third disc is further proof of Ninja Tune's procurement ability and is a subtle slice of hypnotizing electro-acoustic gorgeousness.

The great thing about this release is that it isn't a greatest hits album containing the tracks that many of the target audience would already own. Instead it provides a healthy mix of big hitters, rare & unreleased material and remixes. The full spectrum of artists are featured although, disappointingly, sixties psychedelica band, The Dragon's don't appear. Ultimately, `You Don't Know' is a sonic-document proving that Ninja Tune (and its sub labels) are amongst the most important in today's alternative music scene. (RM)
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on 13 March 2008
The `something for everyone' idea has never been more applicable than with this, a mammoth compilation from Ninja Tune Records. Clocking in with 50 tracks, this is the fifth instalment in a series of compilations designed to provide listeners with the newest, the rarest and the oldest that the label has to offer in the form of hip-hop, dance, electronic beats, rap and all the various sub-genres that lovingly fall under this. Collaborations including familiar artists such as Roots Manuva and DJ Shadow are coupled alongside newer artists such as Cadence Weapon, all of which allows listeners to become increasingly familiar with an all-encompassing spectrum of urban music. Unreleased and forthcoming material is also on show as are various re-mixes for the compulsive completist in you. It is the expansive variety of genres that is the most appealing here, so if you are open to new music alongside more familiar listening then this is most definitely something to invest in.
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on 23 September 2010
So, I may sound like some grumpy old f**t going on about the good old days but as far as I'm concerned NT haven't released a consecutive bunch of great albums since 2004. Sure there've been a couple here and there but seems to me, like with Warp, that the best days are behind them. And that's reflected in this box collection. The best tunes here are from longer established acts on the NT roster with their takes on jazz, trip hop, instrumental hip hop and breakbeat. Just not so fussed about the stuff put out out my some of the newer acts here, doing unremarkable bog standard hip hop or dance floor s***. To my ears there are about 15 -20 good tracks out of the 50, while others here are frankly pants. This simply doesn't compare with cracking compilations like Funkungfusion, Zen, the Solid Steel series and Flexistentialism. Now, if the best tracks had been bunged onto one CD it would've def been a 5 star effort.
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on 8 May 2008
The first two reviews are very thorough so I try not to repeat. Rarely write reviews but this has to be one of the best compilations I have heard in many years. As mentioned previously, the unique feature is the mix of releases from the relatively recent past (vs v old) and forthcoming releases. Amazingly varied tracks with the overwhelming majority of great quality. I admit I'm a Ninja record label fan but even if youre not into so called "underground stuff" I thoroughly recommend this to anyone with even a mild interest listening to stuff from outside the charts! You wont be disappointed. Would make a great surprise present for someone who's into their music.
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on 22 February 2008
The dropping of a multi-CD compilation by Ninja Tune or Big Dada is big news. So many of their previous compilation albums have become revered classics that music lovers go back to time and time again. Who can forget releases like `Zen Cuts' (possibly one of the greatest compilations released), `Funkungfusion' and the more recent `Well Deep: 10Yrs of Big Dada'. The classic status of these releases is not purely gained by the quality and eccentricity of the artists on the label's rosters, but thanks to the rarities and remixes that adorn these compilations.

Blowing all previous notions of your typical compilation album out of the window and surpassing even their own high standards, Ninja Tune has served up this fantastic 49track 3CD compilation. Acting as a barometer to the state of alternative off-kilter music in 2008, the compilation serves as a signpost of where the label has come from and where it's heading. Spanning across the three labels, Ninja Tune, Big Dada and Counter Records, this compilation has something for anyone interested in interesting music, be it hip-hop, psychadelic rock, cut'n'paste, drum'n'bass, dancehall, electronica or just plain sonic weirdness. Famous names like Roots Manuva, Coldcut, Amon Tobin, RJD2 and Mr Scruff rub shoulders with (currently) lesser known names such as The Long Lost, Ghislain Poirier, Max & Harvey, Loka and John Matthias in a compilation that will have you constantly reaching for the tracklisting.

There are surprises lurking around each corner from the kaleidoscopic psyche-rock of Pop Levi to the explicit porncore laced electronica of Spank Rock to the twisted neo-funk to The Heavy. Like hip-hop? Well you're in luck with top cuts from both sides of the Atlantic including the quirky ramblings of King Geedorah, the crazed stylings of TTc, the old skool mash-up of DJ Shadow, the avant-hop of Clouddead, the wisdom spittage of Ty and the future grime of Wiley. Many of these tracks are remixes which give an interesting slant on the originals and which in most cases can't be found anywhere else. A true standout track is `Fear the Labour' by One Self. Comprised of St Petersburg-born Ninja Tune turntable stalwart DJ Vadim, New York rapper Blu Rum 13, and Yarah Bravo, the trio engage in a bout of top-draw hip-hop which sees a manipulated Middle Eastern melody snake over a bottomless bass groove whilst Blu Rum 13 spits consciously overtop.

Dig deeper into the compilation and you'll uncover some thumping beats. Modeselektor carves out a gargantuan stompathon remix of Ghislain Poirier whilst Warrior Queen spits conspicuously on The Bug's contemporised old-skool bashment mash-up, `Poison Dart'. Echoing Pendulum's rock influenced d'n'b, The Qemists burst out with a floor-quaking slice of electro underpinned by a deep Jungle groove. Fans of old-skool drum'n'bass will be in for a treat, because, stepping straight-out from the halcyon days of melodic drum'n'bass where acts like E-Z Rollers and 4Hero dominated the rave scene is Bonobo's `Nightlife'. Reconstructed by bass-heads `Zero DB' and featuring the silky harmonized vocals of Bajka, the track carves out a fresh, contemporised play on the old-skool d'n'b dynamics with its deep rolling basslines, hypnotic melodics and constantly unfurling crisp beats. Moving further on into the compilation sees Coldcut prove that they still have their finger on the pulse with the hypnotic Clint Mansell-esque techno of `Just for the Kick'. The Tiga remix of their `Walk A Mile In My Shoes' also coasts captivatingly with a menacing techno groove.

Staying true to their tradition of putting out the finest music, regardless of genre, the compilation also features some wonderful offerings by acts from more specialist genres. Loka are on hand to provide a dash of exotic jazz fused electronica while Max & Harvey provide an explosive soundtrack of atmospheric noir-ish jazzscapes coupled with elongated female vocals to create a sound reminiscent of early Goldfrapp fused with early Cinematic Orchestra. The Cinematic Orchestra themselves provide both a live track and a remix by Leaf label ambience guru Susumu Yokota. Jaga's contribution towards the end of the third disc is further proof of Ninja Tune's procurement ability and is a subtle slice of hypnotizing electro-acoustic gorgeousness.

The great thing about this release is that it isn't a greatest hits album containing the tracks that many of the target audience would already own. Instead it provides a healthy mix of big hitters, rare & unreleased material and remixes. The full spectrum of artists are featured although, disappointingly, sixties psychedelica band, The Dragon's don't appear. Ultimately, `You Don't Know' is a sonic-document proving that Ninja Tune (and its sub labels) are amongst the most important in today's alternative music scene. (RM)
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on 16 September 2009
Alas, this compilation is not what i was hoping for as a seasoned Ninja Tune fan.

Don't get me wrong theres some good tunes here, but you could easily fit the good stuff onto 1 disc, no need to fill out 3 with some tawdry electro remixes and what not.

Too much electro dancey faggy nonsense here, you remember the glorious days of 9 Lazy 9, Funci Porcini and DJ Food?
Thats what i used to love about Ninja Tune - it was different, most of the stuff on here is not different..its just tame.

Ninja dont love us no more....
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