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on 1 December 2008
As a developer interested in SOA I bought this book hoping to learn about service design and best practices. I found this book very dry and did not feel that I got much from the book. It is the first book I have bought that I have not completed. (I got 3/4 of the way before losing the will to read.)
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on 8 November 2008
This is certainly one of the worst books I've read. My main complaints are:

1) The book is incredibly slow/tedious and boring, though I should have expected that after reading some of Erl's other books.
2) The style of SOA described is, in my view, not workable for most companies. For example its focussed on upfront design and entity services with lots of reuse. A few google searches will show that this is not the only approach you can take and in my view a business oriented SOA, using agile approaches and wrapping coherent domain models is a totally valid alternative.

In any case I wouldn't recommend anyone read this, instead I'd recommend that people look at Enterprise SOA which is a far more interesting read.
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on 22 May 2009
This book is extremely verbose, but light on real meat. It spends 400 pages looking at SOA design from a viewpoint of getting maximum re-use, but doesn't balance this against practical considerations like performance which only occupy a couple of pages. Read it, but don't implement it as is, without balancing it against some other authors viewpoints.
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on 4 March 2014
No doubt the author knows what he's writing about. I think he did a fairly good job at defining SOA concepts and context. But much less at explaining and tutoring. This gives the book an encyclopedic flavor. Probably this book would have been much better if the author simply used shorter sentences to start with.
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on 2 July 2009
Read and re-read this thorough and comprehensive guide to the absolute fundamentals of becoming service-oriented in your thinking, then we will all speak the same language and not be limited to what one or other large vendor tells us. This is not a book aimed at developers who are hands-on delivering software it is aimed at the conceptual architects who have to decide on models and components that make up the software landscape in their company. In any large enterprise there will be in-bedded systems and entrenched views on delivering in silos. Erl describes how to evolve these expensive and unproductive silos into true reusable and independent artifacts. SOA is getting some bad press lately but anything that improves understanding of how to build better enterprise integration is welcome. I look forward to future offerings on federated SOA.
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on 7 September 2007
This is a superb book, which follows on nicely from the two other titles in the Prentice Hall series.

It is interesting to see how Thomas Erl's thoughts and ideas regarding service-oriented computing have progressed and developed with the writing of each new book. This culminates with this book, which is cutting edge in that it covers areas of service-orientation and SOA that I have not seen tackled elsewhere. Thomas has an exceptional understanding of the concepts that he writes about, demonstrated by his lucid and informative style.

Any aspiring or experienced architect should own a copy of this book, and I am now eager to read the four additional books that are planned for 2008 in this series.
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on 27 September 2007
I've heard some people describe Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) as a 'silver bullet' that can solve all IT and business problems. Their less enthusiastic colleagues have described SOA as the IT 'flavour of the month'. Like most things, the truth lies somewhere between the two extremes.

Thomas Erl gives a very practical and understandable explanation of SOA and service design as really the next evolution of good software engineering. There are many SOA buzzwords and concepts that are used rather haphazardly by people in the software industry. Erl explains them all in a precise manner that will really cement your understanding of the underlying design principles whether you have a little or a lot of experience. This is a good book to both read now and use as a reference later.
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on 28 January 2008
Great book!
Thomas Erl documents a set of guidelines for effective design decisions to make SOA real.
This book fills the gap between the pubblications that cover SOA in pure conceptual terms and those that deal with the details of web service implementations.
Each chapter cuts through the hype of SOA by giving clear definitions, guidelines, and metrics that link the conceptual, logical and physical aspects of a Service Oriented Architecture.
This series is going to become for SOA what "Design patterns" of the "Gang of Four" has been for Object Oriented design.
I am looking forward to reading the next pubblication: SOA Patterns.
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on 19 December 2007
Thomas Erl's books are of extremely high quality, have masses of information packed within the covers but still remain readable and practical. I've undertaken a complex new SOA initiative and have relied heavily on the information within this book, from first principals through to detailed case studies the book has been my guide and I find it now in a "well-thumbed" state on my shelf. Indispensable.
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