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4.2 out of 5 stars
41
4.2 out of 5 stars
Agatha Christie's Seven Dials Mystery [DVD]
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 10 August 2017
An all star cast in this version of The Seven Dials Mystery by Agatha Christie, including John Gielgud amongst others. A country house, a cast of totally over the top characters, mystery, murder and mayhem as well a good dose of political intrigue thrown in. All combined in a fairly humorous adaptation of Christies' novel. As per the novel itself, it's all very tongue in cheek stuff. I can't say that it's a wonderful adaptation (although, admittedly, the novel itself is not a favourite of mine) but it is certainly worth watching if you've yet to see it and it's a couple of hours of relaxing, fun viewing. There is one disc in a smartly presented case with 133 minutes of viewing time. The quality of film is rather of its time, but perfectly watchable all the same. Well packaged with excellent Amazon delivery.
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on 17 August 2017
tatty
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on 13 September 2009
Thoroughly enjoyed this DVD and would recommend it to anyone who enjoys Agatha Christie stories. It has a great cast. I enjoyed the story and, as usual, there were plenty of red herrings to keep you guessing.
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on 29 August 2017
Laughably bad, with a ludicrous plot, ham acting all round (except for Gielgud), and an intensely irritating 'heroine' in the woman Bundle.
If you want quality from the so-called 'Golden Age' of detective fiction, try Edward Petherbridge as Lord Peter Wimsey (also made in the 80s, but infinitely superior).
Agatha Christie, like the over-rated John Gielgud, has become a sacred cow whose limitations are never acknowledged.
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on 26 December 2016
Finally this has been released by Network, so no more irritatingly-badly edited commercial breaks. Yes the breaks interrupt the flow of the film, but the script and editing were constructed with these from the outset, so it's far less distracting IMO to fully retain them. Also includes the original-period production company branding, just for that real sense of nostalgia.

This is never going to receive any awards for picture quality but, even if the original film elements still exist, I doubt it would be cost-effective to remaster it after it's been released so many times before. However it looked no worse when it was first shown - just that our TVs probably hid the imperfections back then!

As for the production, at 2.25 hrs it glorious pre-dates the days of clock-face TV productions, so is the length the producers needed to do the story justice. A whodunit true to Christie's tradition of giving you almost all the clues, yet still misleading you in plain-sight!
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VINE VOICEon 10 November 2005
The era 1920’s the plays a country house where diplomats are staying. Soon a mission to evaluate a new material that is vital to aviation.
Gerry Wade (Robert Longden) seems to be a late sleeper it makes one thing that he may be dead when the story starts. Well his friends with the help of an extraordinarily smart Rupert 'Pongo' Bateman (James Griffiths) bring in eight alarm clocks to help Gerry wake up. Looks like they may have been a tad late with their scheme.
People are starting to die. Marquis of Caterhan (John Gielgud) wants to know why his daughter Lady Eileen 'Bundle' Brent (Cheryl Campbell) ran over a man and shot him. As the man is dying he mentions “the seven Dials” and Jimmy Thesiger (James Warwick). She assumes that she is meant to tell Jimmy of the something or someone called the seven dials. From there the plot thickens.
The seven dials theme plays through the whole story. We see it in clocks and clock towers; it turns up on paper and dieing breath. Is it a location or a cabal and does it really have something to do with the mystery?
As with many of Agatha Christies stories there are so many characters that you need a score card. Also there seems to be plots inside plots. Everyone could have done it and yet it is always the last person you suspect; or should I say usually the last person you would suspect. The film was adapted from the Novel by Pat Sandys, has the added benefit of the feeling that it is a play.
The film is packed with well known British actors and sometimes it is hard not to think now where have I seen this person before. Noticeably absent is Francesca Annis, yet the main female character player Cheryl Campbell is well remembers for her role in The Murder at the Vicarage (1986). John Gielgud excelled in his part as Marquis of Caterhan.
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on 18 December 2001
This is a charming film with plenty of atmosphere and amusing moments - although there are also a number of sinister murders. The production style may be "made for TV" rather than slick, but I think this produces a certain texture that adds to the viewer's pleasure. The film's presentation of a glittering, treacherous world is certainly memorable. There are some good performances, including from John Gielgud and James Warwick; Cheryl Campbell as Lady Bundle is a little OTT - in a rather marvellous sort of way. Rula Lenska also appears. The production and cast are similar to "Why didn't they ask Evans?", and this film is of a similar quality.
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on 30 July 2013
It is impossible not to enjoy this version of the early Agatha Christie story. It is so funny and charming and lighthearted that the absurdity of it all goes down quite well. All the actors are excellent, Gielgud a pleasure as always. It has a sparkling quality not found so much in later versions of Christie, however good they sometimes are.
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on 29 January 2012
THIS PRODUCTION HAS DATED A BIT BUT IS STILL WORTH A WATCH AS THE ONLY VERSION OF AGATHA CHRISTIES "SEVEN DIALS MYSTERY" THAT HAS BEEN FILMED AS FAR AS I KNOW. CHERYL CAMPBELL IS EXCELLENT AS ALWAYS AND IS VERY WELL SUPPORTED BY THE ENTIRE CAST.
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VINE VOICEon 7 September 2008
The era 1920's the plays a country house where diplomats are staying. Soon a mission to evaluate a new material that is vital to aviation.

Gerry Wade (Robert Longden) seems to be a late sleeper it makes one thing that he may be dead when the story starts. Well his friends with the help of an extraordinarily smart Rupert 'Pongo' Bateman (James Griffiths) bring in eight alarm clocks to help Gerry wake up. Looks like they may have been a tad late with their scheme.

People are starting to die. Marquis of Caterhan (John Gielgud) wants to know why his daughter Lady Eileen 'Bundle' Brent (Cheryl Campbell) ran over a man Ronny Devereux (John Vine) and shot him. As the man is dying he mentions "the seven Dials" and Jimmy Thesiger (James Warwick). She assumes that she is meant to tell Jimmy of the something or someone called the seven dials. From there the plot thickens.

The seven dials theme plays through the whole story. We see it in clocks and clock towers; it turns up on paper and dieing breath. Is it a location or a cabal and does it really have something to do with the mystery?

As with many of Agatha Christies stories there are so many characters that you need a score card. Also there seems to be plots inside plots. Everyone could have done it and yet it is always the last person you suspect; or should I say usually the last person you would suspect. The film was adapted from the Novel by Pat Sandys, has the added benefit of the feeling that it is a play.

The film is packed with well known British actors and sometimes it is hard not to think now where have I seen this person before. Noticeably absent is Francesca Annis, yet the main female character player Cheryl Campbell is well remembers for her role in The Murder at the Vicarage (1986). John Gielgud excelled in his part as Marquis of Caterhan.
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