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on 3 June 2017
😊
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on 15 December 2017
Very pleased
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on 15 November 2015
bit disappointed felt subject could have been covered better boringly slow and whole production average
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on 13 August 2013
Received in excellent order and an excellent film to brighten up the day, so thank you very much for the good service
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on 16 May 2015
Field of Dreams is my favourite film,so getting the one telling the story before it starts.just adds to my enjoyment of both films, thank you I have been after Eight Men Out, for some time.
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on 15 August 2014
ENJOYABLE FILM
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on 28 May 2015
Good story
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on 27 July 2012
As a transplanted American in Scotland, I bought 8 Men Out for a bit of baseball and the talented cast. I had studied this conspiracy in law school, and having watched 8 Men Out, I now remember why the scandal resonates throughout the century.

The Black Sox brought into question the integrity of the sport of baseball. However, this movie also illustrates that the integrity of the sport was questionable long before this team. The owners were dirty dealers who were only after the bottom line, taking advantage of the lack of negotiating power of the players.

I have only been able to watch this once since I purchased it, because it broke my heart. But, that's what happens when owners and players cheat and scheme and cheapen sport.

That said, great movie. I enjoyed the sports scenes, the acting and it made me think again about the conspiracy, the owners and the integrity of sport.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 3 January 2013
John Sayles' 1988 drama depicting the real-life events of 1919 in which leading US baseball team, the Chicago White Sox, threw their World Series games against the Cincinnati Reds (thereby labelling themselves the 'Black Sox') is an evocative, well-acted and compelling watch. Whilst Sayles' film is relatively conventional in style, and it would not rank (for me) with great sporting films such as The Hustler, This Sporting Life or (even) The Damned United, it is still an impressive ensemble piece.

In typical Sayles fashion, the film is meticulously researched and designed and, via the cinematography of Robert Richardson and the Joplinesque score by Sayles' regular collaborator Mason Daring, Eight Men Out evokes the era superbly (reminding me at various points of a mix of The Great Gatsby and the early segments of Once Upon A Time In America). Similarly, Sayles once again demonstrates his mastery of working with a large cast, a skill which he has displayed on other films, most notably his masterpiece City Of Hope. Here, not only has he assembled some (at the time, upcoming) major stars for the Sox team in Charlie Sheen (as Oscar 'Happy' Felsch) and the impressive John Cusack as the reluctant bribee George 'Buck' Weaver, but he also elicited some stunning 'character' turns from other (more senior) actors, many of whom form part of Sayles' informal acting troupe. These include a great performance from John Mahoney as the feisty, incorruptible, 'old time' professional, coach William 'Kid' Gleason, and impressive turns from Clifton James as Sox owner Charles 'Commie' Comiskey, Michael Lerner as ruthless, corrupt financier and 'fix sponsor' Arthur Rothstein and the equally slimy Kevin Tighe as co-conspirator Joseph 'Sport' Sullivan. Notable turns are also delivered by Happy and Buck's team-mates, in particular David Strathairn as the reluctantly compromised Eddie Cicotte and from D B Sweeney as the 'backward southern hick', and baseball legend, 'Shoeless Joe' Jackson.

At the core of Sayles' film is the dilemma faced by the publicly lauded, but underpaid, Sox stars and the apparent choice between sports stardom and 'deserved' financial recompense (or the temptation to otherwise take bribes) - flat champagne is no substitute for hard currency. This dilemma is brilliantly played out via a mix of domestic tensions, peer pressure and child-fan idolatry. Sayles also starkly portrays the intra-team rivalries as players (bribees and refusniks), suspicious of each other's motives, nearly come to blows during the games with the Reds. Equally, whilst club supremo Comiskey is livid with his players' duplicitous behaviour, he realises that 'the good' of the sport he reveres is under threat from the scandal, thereby leading to him refusing to testify against his players in the subsequent court trial.

For me, a superior sporting drama, which showcases a number of excellent acting performances, Eight Men Out is a film well worth catching.
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on 21 July 2013
i have always liked baseball movies,and this is one of the best, wonderful performances from all concerned. captures a real flavour of the time, as a typical MGM release there are no extras. but the film is a must buy for fans of the sport, and fans of well made films.
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