Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle New Album - Foo Fighters Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
38
3.9 out of 5 stars
Format: DVD|Change
Price:£4.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 8 August 2017
Outstanding
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 June 2017
Excellent
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 April 2017
Bit slow
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 November 2009
The Paradine Case is generally regarded as one of Hitchcock's lesser efforts, however most Hitchcock is still good Hitchcock.

This DVD presentation from Prism Leisure has a faultless restored image and clear sound, as well as some extra features. Unfortunately the extras are mediocre and most are not specific to the film, other than a few stills in the Photo Gallery. I found it difficult to sit through the Kim Newman interview. The presenter has a good knowledge of Hitchcock but his peculiar appearance and rapid fire delivery were off putting. For those wanting only the movie, this DVD will be more than adequate.

A much better DVD edition is available in R1, released in 2008 in a joint effort by MGM and 20th Century Fox. The image and sound are of an equally high standard, and it comes better equipped with extra features tailored to the film. These include a commentary by Hitchcock scholars Stephen Rebello and Bill Krohn, original theatrical trailer, Hitchcock audio interview with Peter Bogdanovich, 1949 Radio Play starring Joseph Cotton, isolated music and effects track, still galleries and English subtitles. These extras contribute greatly to the understanding and appreciation of the film, making the R1 edition the better choice.

Film 6/10, R2 DVD Edition 3/10, R1 DVD Edition 9/10
22 Comments| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 March 2012
The Paradine Case (1947) stands as a rare Hitchcock courtroom drama. It is one of the Hitch-Selznick films, where Selznick also wrote the script. A beautiful woman Maddalena Anna Paradine (played by Alida Valli) stands accused of murdering her wealthy, blind husband. She enlists the aid of renowned lawyer Anthony Keane (Gregory Peck). As they prepare her defense, the chemistry between the two begins to heat up. And as his emotions for Mrs. Paradine grow stronger, Keane grows more convinced of her innocence. The case will be a difficult one, however, as the judge (Charles Laughton, again) is no friend of Keane's; the queen's prosecutor, played by the excellent Leo G. Carroll, is a serious foe; and only an inspired defense will have any chance of clearing Mrs. Paradine. Only after a series of stunning upsets does Keane realize that, for the first time in his career, he has allowed his heart to rule his head. In a typically perverse Hitchcockian development, the film's most unpleasant character (as usual), an autocratic, vindictive judge played by Laughton, is one of the few who can see through Anna's facade.Small fortune was invested to construct an exact replica of the Old Bailey courtroom for the court scenes.

Peck is one of my all-time favourites. I regard him as one of the very greatest but his American accent sometimes seemed odd, misfit in the Old Bailey courtroom. Yet Peck is still a great actor, and I LOVE court room dramas.

The film was a box-office disappointment, spelling the end of the always-rocky association between Hitch and the mighty Selznick. Hitch wanted Greta Garbo to play Anna Paradine, and indeed a screen test was filmed, but Garbo ultimately declined. Hitch also wanted to cast Laurence Olivier or Ronald Colman as Anthony Keane, but Selznick asserted his power as studio head to insist that Hitchcock use them.
11 Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 February 2001
Maybe it's not Hitch's best (neither his most famous) film, but it is a good work and quite different from his movies of the same period. In his interview by Francois Truffaut, Hitchcock said it was a tale of moral degradation: a woman falling in love for a rude stable-boy, and becoming a criminal. Too bad that Louis Jourdan isn't as sleazy as he should have been for the role of the stable-boy... Anyway, Alida Valli is ambiguous and fascinating, and Laughton menacing and funny as usual. As a whole, a morally intriguing and low key Hitch film. Recommended to his fans.
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 January 2010
it may not be one of Hitchcock's greatest but a must have for your collection none the less. this is worth watching for Charles Laughton portrayal of the Judge and we get to see Gregory Peck really get to stretch his acting chops. the casting is perfect for this picture. the story revolves around Mrs Paradine and her arrest for the murder of her husband. Gregory Peck is the hot shot lawyer defending her and he soon becomes infatuated with her to the extent that it almost destroys his family and career. to say any more would be to give too much of the story away. it may not have many of the usual Hitchcock flourishes but is a very enjoyable courtroom film
11 Comment| 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 4 April 2010
The movie is very proud to be a David O. Selznick film and displays it proudly at the beginning.

This is one of those movies where you go "yeah yeah" I saw before. You are probably thinking of Richard Attenborough's " Trial and Error" (1962) or Billy Wilder's "Witness for the Prosecution" (1957). Much of this film is predictable and then again maybe not. Remember this is a 1947 film.

Rich old blind Mr. Paradine, of whom we never met, is found dead; is it suicide or is it murder? Soon Mrs. Maddalena Anna Paradine (Alida Valli) is accused of having motive and opportunity.

Assigned to defend Maddalena is Anthony Keane, Counsel for the Defense (Gregory Peck). Even with Mrs. Paradine's wild past and alluring continence, Anthony, a happily married man, is sure threat the butler (o.k. the valet) did it. We the viewers also want to help him, as it is obvious if it was not the Andre Latour, Paradine's Valet (a very young Louis Jourdan) than you know who will hang. Not only that but we find the valet to be quite devious.

A plus that gives this film added character is Charles Laughton as Judge Lord Thomas Horfield.

Trial and Error (aka The Dock Brief)
Witness For the Prosecution
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 February 2001
Maybe it's not Hitch's best (neither his most famous) film, but it is a good work and quite different from his movies of the same period. In his interview by Francois Truffaut, Hitchcock said it was a tale of moral degradation: a woman falling in love for a rude stable-boy, and becoming a criminal. Too bad that Louis Jourdan isn't as sleazy as he should have been for the role of the stable-boy... Anyway, Alida Valli is ambiguous and fascinating, and Laughton menacing and funny as usual. As a whole, a morally intriguing and low key Hitch film. Recommended to his fans.
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 22 November 2016
Alfred Hitchcock's final film for David O.Selznick dates from 1947 and was a box office disaster, costing a massive $4.2m to make it recouped half of that.With Selznick after a repeat of the success of Gone With The Wind he interfered even more than usual in the production, changing the script daily after viewing rushes, insisting on choosing actors and building a perfect replica of The Old Bailey at a cost of $400,000 which is heavily used in the second half of the film.

Indeed, the key problems with the film are a) it's largely static and lengthy focus on the courtroom, with Hitchcock experimenting with long takes in a precursor to Rope and Under Capricorn; b) The performance of leading man Gregory Peck, whose expression seems to remain constant regardless of whether he is portraying falling in love with his client, dealing with comments of the prosecution or judge, or when investigating the background of his client in the Lake District faced with a visitation from her husband's valet - only in the climactic final scenes in the courtroom does he show any emotion c) the frankly ridiculous plot twist leading to the final court scenes.

Mrs Paradine, played by then newcomer Alida Valli is accused of poisoning her blind husband, a war hero. Charles Coburn, playing Sir Simon Flaquer, her solicitor engages Gregory Peck, playing Anthony Keane as her defence barrister. Keane has been hugely successful in the past, but as the film goes on we see him become infatuated with Mrs Paradine, causing him to misjudge her mood, particularly towards valet Andrè LaTour, played by another newcomer Louis Jourdan. On a visit to the Paradine's Lake District home LaTour appears offhand towards Mrs Paradine, as well as initially avoiding Keane. This leads Keane to suspect LaTour knows more about the poisoning than he is letting on and upon returning to London suggests implicating LaTour to throw doubt on the case against her - something to his surprise she vehemently revokes. Nevertheless as the case proceeds Keane uses just such a tactic - and gets thrown a huge curve ball by his client, who he is falling in love with despite no reciprocal signals.

Where the film succeeds is in the interaction with minor characters - Sir Simon giving counsel to Keane, Keane's wife Gay played brilliantly by Ann Todd who sees what is going on but won't stand in the way of her husband's work, and in particular a superb tour de force performance from Charles Laughton as Judge Lord Thomas Horfield, in his creepiness and boorish behaviour at a social gathering; in his dry put downs of Keane's showboating in court; and in his interactions with another minor character, his wife Lady Sophie played with upmost dippiness by Ethel Barrymore. Laughton steals every scene he is in and redeems the film.

The tone of the piece is very film noirish, it does have saving graces but is ultimately flawed. The missing element for much of the film is tension, which the courtroom could have been used to convey with script changes, instead there is a lot of dialogue and much is procedural.I can't help but think that Peck is the central issue here - he was hardly first choice with Laurence Olivier, Ronald Colman and Joseph Cotton all slated for the part during the film's long pre-production period. A curiosity nevertheless.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)