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Upon discovering the answer to a now-legendary problem, Archimedes famously yelled "Eureka!" ("I have found it!"), jumped out of his bath, and ran naked through the streets.

So "Eureka" seems like an appropriate name for the Sci-Fi Channel's quirky, well-written sci-fi series, all about a tiny town that brims over with geniuses and scientific breakthroughs. A few of the storylines are draggy, but the series also has some great acting, brilliant dilemmas, and mysteries that promise to fuel future seasons.

While dragging his delinquent daughter back to L.A., Marshal Jack Carter (Colin Ferguson) accidentally crashes the car. The only nearby place is the picture-perfect small-town of Eureka. But Jack starts to suspect that Eureka is a little odd -- a woman making triangular bubbles, a quartet of clones, and a little autistic boy making physics equations on the sidewalk are only a few of the oddities.

His suspicions are confirmed when random places get blasted to ashes, including a cowfield and an RV. So Jack is told Eureka's secret -- it's a town entirely inhabited by geniuses, set up by the government to create new scientific advances. But a scientist has done a little project all on his own, producing a tachyon accelerator -- which is ripping the seams out of the universe.

Because the sheriff was badly injured by the accelerator, D.O.D. representative Allison Blake (Salli Richardson-Whitfield) makes Jack the new sheriff of Eureka. Now he has a new job, a "smart house" in an old nuclear bunker, and a trigger-happy deputy who loves her guns.

But he also has has to deal with a bunch of strange problems -- an electrical "ghost," a scientist whose healing experiments transform him, alien paranoia, memory blackouts, a doomsday device from the Cold War, a drug that causes superspeed, killer nanites, problematic pollen, and a mysterious Artifact deep inside the Global Dynamics building...

The first season of "Eureka" is a pretty good example of how to make a sci-fi show -- not many programs can balance out standalone episodes with long-term arcs (the Artifact, Beverly's agenda). Some of these don't work out, like the artificial Jack/Allison attraction, but most of the time "Eureka" stays on solid ground.

Yeah, most of the storylines center on scientific disasters. But the writers sprinkle it with funny scenarios (the baseball teams are called the Protons and Neutrons) and funny dialogue ("Well, car or no car, this is a 30 mile an hour zone"). But there are moments of poignancy, such as Nathan Stark's tearful farewell to his robot "son," or a woman reluctantly starting to care about her clone's little son.

Despite being the lead, Ferguson doesn't stand out as much because his character is so... ordinary. It's the weirdos that are lovable -- Matt Frewer as a deranged Aussie vet, Ed Quinn as a charming head researcher (and Allison's ex-hubby), Neil Grayston as an ubergeek, and Joe Morton as the car mechanic who also happens to be a brilliant inventer. Jordan Hinson rounds off the cast as Jack's troublemaking daughter.

The first season of "Eureka" hits some road bumps, but it's definitely a well-written, intelligent sci-fi series with a quirky, funny twist. Eureka!
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VINE VOICEon 10 April 2008
I came to this series with no expectations as all I had read were a few reviews and watched a couple of clips on YouTube. I am so glad I gave it a chance. It is like a breath of fresh air amongst all the remakes and re-imaginings that are appearing these days. It has a simple premise, a good cast, and engaging scripts. The plots of each story, while borrowing ideas from other shows, feel fresh and new and come over very much as tributes not rep offs.

The residents of Eureka are a wacky bunch that you can't help but grow to like. The technobabble is presented with tongue firmly planted in cheek. But most of all the show is very well rounded in that it has something for everyone, there's action, romance, comedy, Sci-Fi, and a little titillation but it can be watched by all the family.

Highly recommended.
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on 13 August 2010
Watching this series immediately transported me back to 1989 when I used to regularly tune in to little-remembered quirky Sci-fi series Eerie Indiana - The Complete Series [DVD]. The small town with the weird secret is an idea that the creators of Eureka have latched onto once more, and like its predecessor this is an addictively offbeat drama with some subtle comedy and a host of memorable characters.

The pilot episode introduces everyman US Marshal Jack Carter (played with a light touch by Colin Ferguson) as he transports a wayward teenager along an isolated stretch of road; Carter inadvertently arrives in the strange town of Eureka where he destined to stay. A secret military project is at the heart of Eureka's isolation, and Carter soon finds himself up against Greg Germann's oily scientist as he attempts to unravel events surrounding the mysterious disappearance of a local boy and his father's bizarre experiments. Germann is a welcome presence whom you may remember as unctuous lawyer Richard Fish in Ally McBeal; sadly he disappears after the pilot and is replaced by the equally oily but far less interesting Dr Nathan Stark. Joe Morton, another familiar big-screen face, is excellent as town jack-of-all-trades Dr Henry Deacon, and Erica Cerra makes her presence felt as firearms-obsessed Deputy Jo Lupo, whose abrasive manner and lack of social skills lead to her and Jack clashing regularly.

Although there are a few minor inconsistencies between episodes; a result of them being transmitted in a slightly different order from which they were made, the series flows nicely and the town's residents grow more interesting as the show goes on. The blend of light humour, Sci-fi shenanigans and intrigue works brilliantly, and watching this is the perfect way to unwind after a long stressful day.
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Upon discovering the answer to a now-legendary problem, Archimedes famously yelled "Eureka!" ("I have found it!"), jumped out of his bath, and ran naked through the streets.

So "Eureka" seems like an appropriate name for the Sci-Fi Channel's quirky, well-written sci-fi series, all about a tiny town that brims over with geniuses and scientific breakthroughs. A few of the storylines are draggy, but the series also has some great acting, brilliant dilemmas, and mysteries that promise to fuel future seasons.

While dragging his delinquent daughter back to L.A., Marshal Jack Carter (Colin Ferguson) accidentally crashes the car. The only nearby place is the picture-perfect small-town of Eureka. But Jack starts to suspect that Eureka is a little odd -- a woman making triangular bubbles, a quartet of clones, and a little autistic boy making physics equations on the sidewalk are only a few of the oddities.

His suspicions are confirmed when random places get blasted to ashes, including a cowfield and an RV. So Jack is told Eureka's secret -- it's a town entirely inhabited by geniuses, set up by the government to create new scientific advances. But a scientist has done a little project all on his own, producing a tachyon accelerator -- which is ripping the seams out of the universe.

Because the sheriff was badly injured by the accelerator, D.O.D. representative Allison Blake (Salli Richardson-Whitfield) makes Jack the new sheriff of Eureka. Now he has a new job, a "smart house" in an old nuclear bunker, and a trigger-happy deputy who loves her guns.

But he also has has to deal with a bunch of strange problems -- an electrical "ghost," a scientist whose healing experiments transform him, alien paranoia, memory blackouts, a doomsday device from the Cold War, a drug that causes superspeed, killer nanites, problematic pollen, and a mysterious Artifact deep inside the Global Dynamics building...

The first season of "Eureka" is a pretty good example of how to make a sci-fi show -- not many programs can balance out standalone episodes with long-term arcs (the Artifact, Beverly's agenda). Some of these don't work out, like the artificial Jack/Allison attraction, but most of the time "Eureka" stays on solid ground.

Yeah, most of the storylines center on scientific disasters. But the writers sprinkle it with funny scenarios (the baseball teams are called the Protons and Neutrons) and funny dialogue ("Well, car or no car, this is a 30 mile an hour zone"). But there are moments of poignancy, such as Nathan Stark's tearful farewell to his robot "son," or a woman reluctantly starting to care about her clone's little son.

Despite being the lead, Ferguson doesn't stand out as much because his character is so... ordinary. It's the weirdos that are lovable -- Matt Frewer as a deranged Aussie vet, Ed Quinn as a charming head researcher (and Allison's ex-hubby), Neil Grayston as an ubergeek, and Joe Morton as the car mechanic who also happens to be a brilliant inventer. Jordan Hinson rounds off the cast as Jack's troublemaking daughter.

The first season of "Eureka" hits some road bumps, but it's definitely a well-written, intelligent sci-fi series with a quirky, funny twist. Eureka!
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on 19 February 2011
i found myself buying a lot of series i used to watch years back - eureka falls into that category

cheap non-credible digital effects, simple characters with very simple stories, easy to follow episodes and enjoyable storyline and character development

unfortunately, the series are so easy to follow that i've gone through season 1 very quickly and hoping season 2 will last until the end of the weekend

the ingredients and the way the story is put together isn't anything new: good-intentions dad trying to make things right with small delinquent daughter after moving to a new town (following a "promotion") - the only reason you don't hate the always-mess-up-dad's-actions is because, in the end, he behaves the way a proper/former u.s. marshall behaves: falling short on rigid posture, he is not a goof - he does is job and does it well

the dialogue is very well put together and you don't get bored of listening the characters - not really straight english most of the times and, if one understands the laws of physic, you'll find very interesting remarks and notice that some of the writers really did their homework

there are plenty of series with deep stories and complicated characters and plots - luckily, there are still easy-to-watch series with small (but relevant) doses of all you can find in other series put together in a simple way

there is, obviously, a con: like so many other series, there are no subtitles available - english is not my first language and, although i never seem to struggle with any accent or expression, and not to mention that i can't really watch it later at night, running the risk of waking up the rest of the house, i believe it is inexcusable to leave out hearing impaired people given the technology we have for the last (few, good) years-- i wouldn't classify it as negligence, it's simple careless and lack of respect

if you're looking for a series to stimulate your brain, give this one a pass for now

if you're looking for something easy to watch when you get home on a friday after a long week work then look no further
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Protected by an electromagnetic shield the eccentric town of Eureka has maintained its clandestine existence for near on 50 years. Its townsfolk, made up of brilliant scientists have been tasked by the government of the United States to expand their knowledge and understanding in order to advance the human race. It is to be expected that in such an environment mishaps occasionally occur and the unexpected arrival of a US Marshall and his daughter during one of these incidents is our introduction to this rather unusual community. Each episode features a particular scientific mishap and despite comprising stand-alone stories there is a discernible narrative arc involving a mysterious artefact, and although the series has a feel-good tone there are some serious issues addressed. There are likeable characters aplenty and it is their ongoing interactions which make this series such a delight with Colin Ferguson’s performance as the newly appointed town sheriff pitched just right – a baffled ordinary lawman trying to maintain order in a ludicrously extraordinary community. I found each episode engaging and tremendous fun and a wonderful antidote to some of the more serious television series I have been watching recently.
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on 2 November 2011
I've watched and enjoyed Rome, 24, The Shield etc etc. I've enjoyed the gratuitous violence and the darker side of the human psyche, however I can truly say that I really enjoyed the true innocence of Eureka. Maybe I'm getting tired of the cynicism or a bit maudlin in my old age but it was extremely 'nice' to have 'nice' people acted reasonably well, when even the villains fall into badness by accident. Of course the plot lines and snippet stories will never win a high brow literary award but that isn't what they're designed for. Yes it does harken back to those, Along the Riverbank and Peter and Jane days, (Showing my age now), but thank God we can have a series that isn't designed to depress, shock or provide a deep social commentary. It's just simple FUN and maybe it doesn't do any of us any harm to go back to being a child once in a while.
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on 1 March 2016
a top notch fun series with characters who you like. The sheriff generally puts the big brains to shame, if you like shows that don't take themselves too seriously and enjoy telling a story then this is for you.
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on 14 January 2008
Eureka season 1 is an undemanding series. No complicated plots or deep emotions. However it can be funny and the bonus materials indicate an enthusiastic following as shown by fake infomercials and webisodes for serious fans.

First the poor bits. Each crisis is often caused by a superscience mishap and seems to often be solved by a device invented for the purpose. Jo Morton playing genius garage mechanic Henry, almost seems to mimic Mr Spock regularly saving the Enterprise by reversing the polarity on gobbledygook. A lot of the "science" is just fantasy and wish fulfilment - and might as well be magic. Just throw in a few topical physics words.

Sometimes there are events which are really tragic, involving the loss of families or loved ones. There are disasters which level city blocks and surely kill hundreds. Yet there is no feeling of loss. Its just part of the plot. Sherriff Carter never seems to stop apologising to his wayward daughter.

Now the good stuff. The acting is solid and Ed Quinn is stands out as the Director of Eureka. Selfish and driven - one episode has his emotions reflected in a computer link where his dreams of world domination become public. But he is also unsure of himself and has a nice line in sarcasm.

Colin Ferguson plays the Sheriff well, often getting a laugh with his uneducated dialog against Ed Quinns ascerbic Nathan Stark.

There are some good jokes and slapstick scenes throughout. Although if you watch the commentaries it becomes obvious that the network rearranged the episodes to make the early ones stronger and hook an audience. I think they were right, because the middle third of them did not grab me.
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on 20 May 2016
Never saw this on TV but kept seeing adverts for later series and wish I had seen it. I can't usually join something mid series so started on the box set

Really loved this. Watch it on 2 hour train commute and it's a fun enjoyable series. Such a refreshing change. You can't help but love the geeky characters. Brilliant chemistry and cheers you up. Even though They have to save the town or world every week

You actually wish this existed and lived there and even be half as funny and intelligent as them

I want Sarah to run my house!
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