Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop now

Customer reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
9
4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
Format: DVD|Change
Price:£8.00+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 7 September 2017
Pure joy in a box. An extraordinary man's amazing story. inspirational and important.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
"Men are often haunted by things that happen to them in life, especially in war or other periods of great intensity. Sometimes you see these men walking in the streets or driving in a car; their lives seem to be normal, but they are not..."

With these words, Werner Herzog begins the tale of Dieter Dengler - it's one of the most affecting stories I've ever heard.

Dieter Dengler is a man profoundly changed by his experiences, but one who is full of enthusiastic energy: the first thing we notice is that, even though he came to America aged 18 at least 35 or 40 years before this film was made, his accent remains a resolutely German one; events in his life have doubtless had a huge effect on his life, but his voice still remains true to his motherland.

Externally then, he shows little change, but most people would have been crushed by what he went through. Bavarian-tinged words tumble from him in a happy rush - there is an agile, sharp mind navigating his sentences, but always - even when relating horrific episodes of his quite frankly, humbling story - there is this boyishly vigorous joy in being able to relate his tale. And what a tale it is:

After seeing a Spitfire swoop withing a car's length of his family house in Germany during the Second World War, Dieter was determined to become a pilot. We follow the story as he tells us how he arrived penniless in America, like so many before him, eventually becaame a pilot for the US Air Force, and found himself fighting in Vietnam. He was shot down, captured, finally escaped, and then rescued.

That's the heavily-abridged version. He revisits the jungle scenes and relives the moments, even marching with armed Vietnamese for authenticity. He maintains this incredible positive talkative energy - at one point saying it was all a bit too close to the bone, but trauma is never his master - keeps the viewer enthralled. Never does Werner have to prompt him - he is an interviewer's dream. We empathise with him completely as he tells of the terrible experiences he had. When he is finally greeted by all his old friends after surviving months on the run in the jungle, it is intensely emotional for us to watch. Here is an incredibly strong, brave - and above all, generous man: generous in the way he gives himself to us as he talks.

Many times he should by rights have died. But death, it seems, didn't want him. I grew to love this man by the time this film had finished.

Humbling. One of Herzog's truly great films.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
"Men are often haunted by things that happen to them in life, especially in war or other periods of great intensity. Sometimes you see these men walking in the streets or driving in a car; their lives seem to be normal, but they are not..."

With these words, Werner Herzog begins the tale of Dieter Dengler - it's one of the most affecting stories I've ever heard.

Dieter Dengler is a man profoundly changed by his experiences, but one who is full of enthusiastic energy: the first thing we notice is that, even though he came to America aged 18 at least 35 or 40 years before this film was made, his accent remains a resolutely German one; events in his life have doubtless had a huge effect on his life, but his voice still remains true to his motherland.

Externally then, he shows little change, but most people would have been crushed by what he went through. Bavarian-tinged words tumble from him in a happy rush - there is an agile, sharp mind navigating his sentences, but always - even when relating horrific episodes of his quite frankly, humbling story - there is this boyishly vigorous joy in being able to relate his tale. And what a tale it is:

After seeing a Spitfire swoop withing a car's length of his family house in Germany during the Second World War, Dieter was determined to become a pilot. We follow the story as he tells us how he arrived penniless in America, like so many before him, eventually becaame a pilot for the US Air Force, and found himself fighting in Vietnam. He was shot down, captured, finally escaped, and then rescued.

That's the heavily-abridged version. He revisits the jungle scenes and relives the moments, even marching with armed Vietnamese for authenticity. He maintains this incredible positive talkative energy - at one point saying it was all a bit too close to the bone, but trauma is never his master - keeps the viewer enthralled. Never does Werner have to prompt him - he is an interviewer's dream. We empathise with him completely as he tells of the terrible experiences he had. When he is finally greeted by all his old friends after surviving months on the run in the jungle, it is intensely emotional for us to watch. Here is an incredibly strong, brave - and above all, generous man: generous in the way he gives himself to us as he talks.

Many times he should by rights have died. But death, it seems, didn't want him. I grew to love this man by the time this film had finished.

Humbling. One of Herzog's truly great films.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 December 2010
The most inspiational film I have ever seen. If you feel sad or unhappy with your life this film will take you to another better place.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 March 2013
Werner Herzog is a brilliant director and I would thoroughky recommend this film and any of Werner's films to you if you enjoy a well crafted documentary. This director never gets in the way of his subject.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 December 2012
'Little Dieter Needs to Fly' - Absolutely wonderful ... a great little film and a true story to boot!
Drew.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 22 April 2009
This is a documentary about Dieter Dengler a German-American navy pilot shot down in Vietnam. This film is a great example of Herzog's work, with Dieter return back to Vietnam to explain the story of his capture and most importantly his escape.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 February 2013
Although it is great for Herzog to dive into the aspirations of Dieter flying desire and his story in Vietnam, the result is a bit boring. I like Herzon a lot but found this one too long for its content
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 March 2016
THX
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)