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Customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
62
4.4 out of 5 stars
Format: DVD|Change
Price:£6.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


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on 25 May 2017
Excellent. Thank you.
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on 10 August 2017
One of my Favourite film.
My dad used to moan about when I borrowed his.
That's why I brought this.
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on 16 June 2017
Perfect
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on 4 September 2017
A very funny film
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on 24 April 2017
One of the best war movies : a thriller, a fine comedy, suspens, a good evening in the past
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on 11 May 2017
A good old British classic film.
Prompt delivery
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on 7 March 2007
Prospective buyers should know that this item contains a fantastic extra - the full 53 minute 1975 Granada TV play the Prodigal Daughter, starring Alastair Sim (in one of his last TV performances) and a young Jeremy Brett. The rarity value of that extra makes this DVD well worth purchasing.

Cottage To Let has a "straight from video" feel to it, but that's no bad thing for a 66 year old film - almost adds to the charm in fact.

Overall, I cannot rate this item highly enough - superb!

NB - Extras also include a short stills gallery from Cottage To Let.
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on 3 June 2017
This DVD arrived quickly. I have bought it for my brother so haven't watched it and as I've put it away for Christmas I won't know what the verdict is till then but it sounds just his "cup o tea"
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 12 November 2012
This film was made during the war when nobody knew whether Britain would prevail or not. That's important: films made after the war have the inbuilt certainty that the viewer knows the overall outcome. This one had uncertainty as its backdrop: a very real fear that the nation could be overrun.

The message of the film is 'beware to whom you are talking - they could be spies' and the plot twists and turns until the eventual revelation and ending.

By modern day standards the production is minimalist - not surprising when there was no scope for extravagance. But nothing can detract from the roll-call of first rate actors, including one of my favourites, Alastair Sim. He is superb - dominating the screen whenever he is on.

A brilliant film? No, at least not by later standards. An important film? Yes, very much so. It transmits the sense of fear and uncertainty of the war years. Watch it in that context and you will find it gives an important historical perspective of the tension through which everyone was forced to live at the time.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 22 December 2016
Directed by Anthony Asquith (who was also behind the camera for "The Winslow Boy" and the brilliant "The Browning Version", amongst many others), this is a classic British WWII espionage thriller. Starring Alistair Sim, John Mills, Leslie Banks and a very young George Cole, as a London evacuee, it tells the tale of shady goings on, set on a Scottish estate.
A spitfire pilot (Mills) crashes into a Scottish Loch and is taken to a local cottage hospital on the estate of Mrs Barrington (comedically played by Jeanne de Casalis). Unfortunately, she has also inadvertently rented the cottage to the rather mysterious Charles Dimble (Sim).......
As you might expect from such a cast, the acting is top drawer, with a clever plot and a subtely sinister feel to it all.

Recommended
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