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on 5 March 2017
.... there is hardly more to be said about this film, other than to reinforce what has been said already with very (VERY) few dissenting voices. Its about as factually correct as you are going to get from a Hollywood movie that's made for profit, not historical reference and accuracy.
Best plan with this film, is sit back and immerse yourself into the plot lines and self evident skills at all levels and types displayed; never mind the interminable beat for best comment blah blah. Just view and enjoy a superbly made film, as factual as you are going to get for a commercial Hollywood movie, that is about one of the Iconic events of the 20th Century.
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on 17 June 2015
THE FILM, WHICH IS ONE OF MY FAVOURITE FILMS, IN MOST WAYS DEPICTS ACCURATELY THE HISTORY OF THE BOMBING OF PEARL HARBOUR WITH AMERICA AS OPPOSED TO JAPANESE PERSPECTIVE.
INDEED, AS MOST AUDIENCES AND CRITICS MIGHT HAVE OBSERVED, THE FILM HAS A CERTAIN DOCUMENTARY FEEL TO IT.
THE ACTORS HAD BEEN CHOSEN BY THE DIRECTOR TO ACHIEVE THIS OBJECTIVE.
BESIDES THERE WAS A WEALTH OF DOCUMETARY FILMS ON THE HISTORY OF THE BOMBING ON PEARL HARBOUR AND ONE ON THE MAKING OF IT. THE MASTERING OF THE WHOLE FILM WAS EXCELLENT ESPECIALLY WHEN VIEWED IN THE PANASONIC BD 75 AND SONY LED EX 710 ALTHOUGH BOTH MACHINES ARE ONLY 2D CAPABLE. I MUST TAKE NOTE HERE THE ONE I BOUGHT IS NOT REGION B ENCODED AS ONE MIGHT HAVE BEEN LED TO BELIEVE BUT IT IS ENCODED WITH REGION A B C, WHICH MEANS BLU RAY PLAYERS WITH REGIONS A, B, OR C WOULD BE ABLE TO READ THIS DISC.
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on 12 September 2017
Fab action movie. Dogfight scenes much more realistic than Pearl Harbor film.
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on 7 September 2017
GOOD value, excellent in the Blu-ray version, well acted.
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on 6 August 2017
Great movie. A must for anyone's collection
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on 11 November 2016
brilliant
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on 14 March 2016
Excellent movie as war films go this is one of the best.
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on 20 April 2017
a great DVD. a joy to watch
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on 22 April 2016
great
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20th Century Fox's genuinely spectacular account of the attack on Pearl Harbor told from both the American and Japanese viewpoints was possibly in real terms an even bigger financial disaster for the studio than Cleopatra: even by latter-period roadshow standards, reminding American audiences of the incredible catalogue of blunders and incompetence that led to the Day of Infamy at a time when they were in the midst of another war in Asia (and one that was not going well) seems like business decision making at its most kamikaze. The film has probably made more money out of being carved up for stock footage than it ever did in the cinema, featuring prominently in Midway, Pearl, Australia, the TV version of From Here To Eternity and both The Winds of War and War and Remembrance among others.

Like Cleopatra, it was a troubled production: Akira Kurosawa worked on the Japanese side of the film for months but delivered only one brief scene in the finished film before being replaced by two more special effects friendly directors (Toshio Masuda and Kinji Fukasaku) while on the American side Richard Fleischer relied on Ray Kellog and Robert Enrietto to shoot much of the spectacular finale. To add to their woes, several politicians complained about the use of Naval and military personnel and the aircraft carrier Yorktown in the film, one even going so far as to try to get a change in the law to prevent filmmakers being allowed to use them in the future, with the studio having to take out adverts in newspapers during filming to reassure the public the film wasn't anti-American but a reminder of the need for constant vigilance. The critics weren't kind and, to cap it all, the film's losses led to studio head Richard D. Zanuck being fired by his own father Darryl F. Zanuck, who would in turn be forced out of the studio a few months later.

From the last days when films were consciously visually designed for the Scope screen, it is mounted on a scale that would be inconceivable today - what Pearl Harbor did with CGi it did with real ships and aircraft - with a tight, focused script that dispenses with fictional sub-plots (no Ben Affleck winning the Battle of Britain single-handed here) in favour of absolute historical accuracy. Seen entirely from the military and political mindset, it has the edge on most cinematic exercises in battlefield history through the conviction of its direction, particularly the visually impressive Japanese sequences, and of its playing. With the exception of Soh Yamamura and E.G. Marshall, most of the top-liners are barely in the film, but the large ensemble cast copes surprisingly well with the task of having to embody attitudes and impart information rather than working on clearly defined characters, adding the colour as they find it in the gaps. Perhaps most surprising is the incredible degree of tension the film manages to achieve in the run-up to the attack despite the inevitability of the outcome. When it finally comes, the special effects are among the best ever seen on the screen. Jerry Goldsmith's score is also a major plus, relentlessly building menace and tension as the film races toward the inevitable.

While the previous DVD issue was pretty threadbare, the Cinema Reserve edition has a number of features covering both the making of the film and the real attack itself, although a 20-minute featurette from the first US DVD release but dropped from the original PAL release, Day of Infamy, has still not been included (it can be found on the US two-disc version, however).

Fox's Region A, B and C Blu-Ray offers both the 145-minute US version and the 149-minute Japanese version, which gives the main directorial credit to Toshio Masuda and Kinji Fukasaku and adds two scenes that really should have stayed in the international version: one a very solemn sequence where a minister prepares Admiral Yamamoto for a ritual meeting with the Emperor about the impending war all too aware that both men opposed it and are reluctant to fulfil their ceremonial roles while another features two Japanese galley cooks talking about crossing the international date line, the consequences of which only became clear in the aftermath of the attack. It also features all the extras from the two-disc DVD, including the Richard Fleischer/Stuart Galbreith audio commentary that isn't mentioned on the packaging and the historical featurette Day of Infamy that wasn't included on the international DVD releases as well as 91-minute and 22-minute documentaries on the making of the film, 10 Movietone newsreel extracts dealing with the attack and its aftermath, stills galleries and a fullframe theatrical trailer. It's easily the best home video presentation of the film to date.
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