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on 8 October 2017
This is the second time ordering this DVD. A child came to visit and watched it and asked if i could order one for them!!!!
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on 1 December 2017
Very good move, I have watched it a few times
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on 6 January 2018
NO PROBLEMS
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on 4 July 2017
this is great
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on 5 November 2017
Great kids story
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on 17 November 2017
love this film awesome.
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on 7 January 2015
Film excellent once seller sent the right one
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on 15 March 2009
This movie has inspired a little girl to want to read, spell and be just like Akeelah! - as I hoped it would. It even motivates me!
It was worth every cent that it cost!
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TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 9 April 2010
After winning her school spelling bee, Akeelah is something of a reluctant victor and unwilling to draw attention to her abilities in a school which can barely afford textbooks.

The film charts her progress as she is encouraged by her head teacher and the enigmatic Dr. Larabee to go on an be a contestant in the national spelling bee while she deals with personal problems at home. Akeelah lives in a disadvantaged part of Los Angeles and her family is dealing with the death of her father some years past. Given the economic struggles and the harsh reality of life in the ghetto, it's easy to see how winning a spelling competition is viewed in such low regard. The film shows us how Akeelah is torn by the ambition to use her intellect and shine through and the desire to simply fit in with the crowd.

Although it sometimes looks pretty obvious where the film is going and seems to incorporate many of the clichés you expect from an underdog story, the naturalistic performances and the gritty domestics bring it back down to earth and the characters feel real enough for you to care about what happens. Akeelah And The Spelling Bee doesn't shy away from highlighting the social divide created by having communities at opposite ends of the wealth spectrum, issues such as snobbery and racism are present and tackled in a way that doesn't feel forced. The film doesn't go on a crusade, it simply presents a good story in a way which reveals a lot about modern life in America. This probably represents life in the rougher urban areas more accurately than most films, the folk there aren't all tagged with stereotypes, they are people with depth and the same hopes, fears, and capacity achieve their full potential as the rest of us.

In a nutshell: This almost feels like a spin on the Karate Kid - Akeelah is the young Daniel who is struggling to find direction in life and is being bullied, and Dr. Larabee - the past winner of the competition is Mr Miyagi - a tutor whose methodology appears strange at first, but reveals itself to be a holistic approach to becoming champion. This has been described as a `feel-good' film, and it certainly is. It might not be particularly original, but it's an honest tale about a girl you want to see succeed, you get behind her and become absorbed in her story.
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on 23 May 2017
We watched this film as part of our film club in school. Here are some of the comments: 'I think it teaches about spelling and friendship,', 'Some parts were okay, but it wasn't the most exciting', 'the plot was different but dragged on a bit.', 'the characters were interesting.'
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