Learn more Download now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more



on 18 April 2015
The Movie is Great, but the DVD doesn't include the original Japanese voice overs. I didn't notice it until it was to late!
This should be a crime, not just for anime, but for any foreign film in general, not to include the original audio in the language it was written.
11 Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 15 November 2017
Arrived in the mail today. Although both the slipcase and disk jacket have incorrectly listed the running time as 99 mins I can verify that this is the Director’s Cut that runs 126 minutes. So anyone that was stuck with the previous UK DVD release which was the heavily cut theatrical cut should throw it out immediately and buy this. For those of us that had the proper dvd release from another territory it is still worth considering if you’re a big fan of the film. Visuals have greatly improved (although as this was cell animation it’s not quite as dazzling as say Harlock or other more recent HD releases). The sound is absolutlely stunning. It has both original Japanese and English soundtracks upgraded to Dolby Tru HD 5.1 and all the original dvd extras have been transferred over to this release. Highly recommended.
11 Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 27 August 2017
Incredible
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 14 January 2015
The story is about a boy who has a revolutionary machine and he has to learn how to harness its power. The animation is amazing and hundreds of animators spent hundreds of hours making this. Its probably still the most expensive anime to date, but unlike akira it was made for kids to be able to watch with their elders. The story is deep and well thought about rather than throwing in large action scenes, although it consists of many large explosions which look really well animated. If you want to see a movie that has a more predated story its a great film, if you are after twisted scifi story line with action you are looking in the wrong place...
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 27 March 2012
This is truly a great film, the story is simple and sometimes simple is best, in a nutshell its about ray steam (the main character) receives a package from his grandad which contains a steam ball, a ball that contains an almost infinite supply of energy, bad guys want it for bad things, good guys want it for good things. Its kind of based on real life, we have nuclear energy, in the film they have a steam ball, it can be used for great positive things and awful negative things. Like I say the story is pretty simple but there's plenty of twists and turns along the way and a decent amount of action. The animation of course is just eye bleedingly beautiful, for example there is a scene where a weapons exhibition is about to take place and confetti is streaming down there must be hundreds of tiny pieces of confetti on screen, each piece of confetti you see was hand drawn one by one and each piece flows and moves realisticly, the animators actually studied steam to see how it moves and flows so they could accuratly animate it on screen, that is attention to detail you just have to admire and appreciate. If you are an anime fan I strongly recomend this film, if you want to by it go for the uncut version. The cut version has about 30 mins taken out, why anyone would want that version I'll never know. There is a limited 2 disc edition which comes with a steamboy comic with translation, steamboy postcards and an artwork book. Please don't compare it to akira, otomo fans need to understand akira is one of a kind and can never be beat and im sure otomo must know himself he could never beat akira and wouldn't dare try. So watch steamboy with an open mind enjoy the nice simple story and get involved with some good characters,then you are sure to enjoy this film and there are some decent extras for those who get the 2 disc version. And make sure you watch the end credits as the scenes that take place behind the credits act as an epilogue
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
VINE VOICEon 3 January 2007
Great graphics create a very 'realistic' retro view of 19th Centuary Britain although the 'Manchester' accents are unrealistic & somewhat irritating. Also, the hero - a boy - is quite clearly voiced by a woman, which annoyed my 9 year old son!

Apart from these minor points its a very enjoyable science fiction film with little of the 'odd' behavoiur seen in other anime films - there is a fairly paraniod fear of technology thru'out the film but its not over powering.

Maybe I like it because its not great anime but my son & I found it very easy to watch with some great use of colour & some imaginative buildings & backgrounds.

Well worth a look if you like Sci Fi cartoons.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 21 February 2007
As his follow-up to "Akira," Katsuhiro Ôtomo spent a staggering eight years producing "Steamboy," a stellar example of anime steampunk. It's full of detailed animation, solid direction and some really inspired action scenes, although the final fourth is extremely bloated. Dark, detailed, gritty and full of smoke, steam and grime.

In the mid 1800s, Dr. Lloyd Steam (Patrick Stewart) and his son Eddie Steam (Alfred Molina) are involved in top secret experimentation for the O'Hara Corporation. There's a disaster which leaves only one machine intact -- the Steam Ball.

Then Eddie's son Ray (Anna Paquin), a budding inventer, gets the Steam Ball in the mail -- and some thuggish Foundation men destroying the house to get the valuable machine. Ray escapes with the Ball, barely eluding the men, and ends up captured by a rogue zeppelin that tears a train apart. Great scene.

But the man in charge of this is none other than Ray's father Eddie, who was terribly burned and is now part machin. Eddie, who is still working for the Foundation, is in charge of the powerful Steam Tower and all the war inventions inside. Now Ray's loyalties are divided, as his father and grandfather battle in a war that has no clear "right" or "wrong" -- but which may wreck London, then the world.

If you're going to spend almost a decade working on a movie, then people expect a masterpiece. And while "Steamboy" won't change anime the way "Akira" did, it's still a prime example of the steampunk genre -- Victorian English surroundings, but with steam-powered tanks, subs and other technology.

The main plot is basically about a family's conflict over different ideas about how technology should be used. But Katsuhiro Ôtomo includes a deeper meaning to the conflict -- there's no clear-cut villain and hero here, since both Eddie and Lloyd have good intentions, though one believes in peace through power, and the other knows that power corrupts.

And the animation is amazingly detailed, so you can see every puff of steam and smear of grease. No big watery eyes here. It makes the action scenes -- including a zeppelin and train almost smashing into Victoria Station -- all the more compelling. In between, we have some solid character development, such as Ray getting to know the bratty O'Hara heiress, and experimenting with primitive subs and machinery.

But every movie has a flaw, and "Steamboy's" is that the last fourth is bloated. It's a brilliant battle -- especially the flying soldiers -- and the end itself is satisfying. But it's too slow and meandering, and has too many lingering shots of the bulbous tower over London. Fortunately it regains its footing in the last few minutes, especially when Ray takes control of the plot.

Ray himself is one of the most compelling child-heroes ever -- he's genuinely smart, resourceful and mature, but he's still young. He's only learning that not everything in life (even your family) is what it seems. And the supporting cast is also good, with a subdued Molina as Eddie and Stewart as the feisty Lloyd, who seems like an older version of Ray. And then there's Scarlett, a spoiled brat who is pretty annoying up until the final battle.

"Steamboy" suffers from a rather slow finale, but the movie itself is a brilliantly-animated, solidly-plotted adventure. Definitely worth checking out.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 31 March 2008
As his follow-up to "Akira," Katsuhiro Ôtomo spent a staggering eight years producing "Steamboy," a stellar example of anime steampunk. It's full of detailed animation, solid direction and some really inspired action scenes, although the final fourth is extremely bloated. Dark, detailed, gritty and full of smoke, steam and grime.

In the mid 1800s, Dr. Lloyd Steam (Patrick Stewart) and his son Eddie Steam (Alfred Molina) are involved in top secret experimentation for the O'Hara Corporation. There's a disaster which leaves only one machine intact -- the Steam Ball.

Then Eddie's son Ray (Anna Paquin), a budding inventer, gets the Steam Ball in the mail -- and some thuggish Foundation men destroying the house to get the valuable machine. Ray escapes with the Ball, barely eluding the men, and ends up captured by a rogue zeppelin that tears a train apart. Great scene.

But the man in charge of this is none other than Ray's father Eddie, who was terribly burned and is now part machin. Eddie, who is still working for the Foundation, is in charge of the powerful Steam Tower and all the war inventions inside. Now Ray's loyalties are divided, as his father and grandfather battle in a war that has no clear "right" or "wrong" -- but which may wreck London, then the world.

If you're going to spend almost a decade working on a movie, then people expect a masterpiece. And while "Steamboy" won't change anime the way "Akira" did, it's still a prime example of the steampunk genre -- Victorian English surroundings, but with steam-powered tanks, subs and other technology.

The main plot is basically about a family's conflict over different ideas about how technology should be used. But Katsuhiro Ôtomo includes a deeper meaning to the conflict -- there's no clear-cut villain and hero here, since both Eddie and Lloyd have good intentions, though one believes in peace through power, and the other knows that power corrupts.

And the animation is amazingly detailed, so you can see every puff of steam and smear of grease. No big watery eyes here. It makes the action scenes -- including a zeppelin and train almost smashing into Victoria Station -- all the more compelling. In between, we have some solid character development, such as Ray getting to know the bratty O'Hara heiress, and experimenting with primitive subs and machinery.

But every movie has a flaw, and "Steamboy's" is that the last fourth is bloated. It's a brilliant battle -- especially the flying soldiers -- and the end itself is satisfying. But it's too slow and meandering, and has too many lingering shots of the bulbous tower over London. Fortunately it regains its footing in the last few minutes, especially when Ray takes control of the plot.

Ray himself is one of the most compelling child-heroes ever -- he's genuinely smart, resourceful and mature, but he's still young. He's only learning that not everything in life (even your family) is what it seems. And the supporting cast is also good, with a subdued Molina as Eddie and Stewart as the feisty Lloyd, who seems like an older version of Ray. And then there's Scarlett, a spoiled brat who is pretty annoying up until the final battle.

"Steamboy" suffers from a rather slow finale, but the movie itself is a brilliantly-animated, solidly-plotted adventure. Definitely worth checking out.
11 Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 12 January 2007
As with most people, I felt slightly let down by this anime.

I was concerned upon reading the DVD case blurb as the first thing it states is Steamboy was the most expensive anime made at the time, as though this is a definitive selling point. Especially in the case of Anime, it is definatly not. Unfortunately it is the main selling point in this case as the animation surpasses the main plot and character development by a huge margin, obviously proving where most of the budget and creative imput went.

The main problem with Steamboy is that the actual plot and characters never seem to build up to anything before all chaos breaks loose and everything explodes. The film seems to start in the right tone with the main protagonist at home in Manchester on a normal day with his family around him, but his interactions with others appear minimal and laboured after this point. Also, considaring London is a fairly novel setting for an anime, not much of it is ever explored. It would have been far more rewarding to have seen a subplot with more of central London's culture and people involved, rather than it be there solely as nice scenary to destroy.

The ending too is rather weak, but it would have been hard to end Steamboy any other way with such character deficit.

Overall this film disapoints in the area where an Anime shouldn't; amazing visuals are not and never will be a substitute for characters and plot development.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 25 March 2007
I have to start by saying I found this film to be incredible. The animation was outstanding and although the dubbing isn't perfect, i've seen a lot worse on Japanese animation dubs. The English voices fit the characters pretty well, although you can't beat the original Japanese voice and reading the subtitles. The storyline was great and although it did feel a bit slow for the first half, this only made the second half race forward at break neck speed and add to the drama and action, which I can only guess was the intention. I agree that this is probably the most visually stunning animation outside of Ghibli films and the level of detail is simply breathtaking. The extras disc is great, with well over an hour of interviews and featurettes that give a great view on the animators, directors and voice stars opinions on this film, as well as providing information on animation layering and other techniques. I have to say it makes for a wonderful overall package. If you buy this you will own an amazing piece of Japanese animation that is already classed as a cult classic.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse