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Customer reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
19
Picture: Limited Edition
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£39.57+ £4.42 shipping


on 15 February 2018
I have recently decided to get everything with John Mitchell on it. This guy is absolutely stellar, with exceptional melodic guitar work and excellent singing, at the service of marvelous song composition skills. This project features Pete Trewavas from Marillion by the way, and the new album is due later in 2018. Compared to Lonely Robot or Arena, this is more poppy, more "straightforward", not being said in any derogatory sense. If the point was to do the same, why all these different bands, right? I just LOVE everything John does and this is certainly a must have for anyone interested in good music, and John in particular. He is one of the musical "prog rock" geniuses of our time.
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on 2 June 2014
This has got to be up there withe the best of the 'It Bites' modern albums
10 tracks in all, and the excellent prog drumming plus Mr Mitchell's soaring guitar licks accompanied with his usual vocal idiosyncracies make for a masterful collection of songs that are the natural precursor for his accession to the It Bites throne.

Difficult to track down a mint copy but well worth it as it does not appear to be available on MP3 anywhere.

Excellent!
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on 9 October 2009
John Mitchell is one of the unsung heroes of the rock world. A hugely talented guitarist and can sing a bit too. I have heard JM on Frost albums, Arena and It Bites albums and have always been impressed. I bought this album as I wanted to hear more of what he is all about and this is probably more his album than any of the other projects he is involved in.Though the musicianship is first class and the songs well crafted I found that the 'wall of sound' production a little too much. The sound is very compressed and maybe a little overproduced IMO, lots of instruments but hard to distiguish them as the mix is very 'smooth'and doesnt allow any one instument to shine and that includes some of JM's outstanding solo's which is a shame. I do like the album and it boasts some great tunes and players.I do wish it was just a tad more 'dynamic'in the mix - a bit more 'up front' if you like. I admire JM's guitar playing and musical craftmanship and will continue to explore his work further - so its the Urbane next.
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on 1 March 2016
A most underrated album. Re-bought as my original one was stolen..!
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on 30 June 2010
I really did not want to like this album, because, being an It Bites fanatic, I was not ready to be swayed to John Mitchell's "other" side project. But of course, its sheer brilliance has won me over, and I just can't seem to get the thing out of my CD player. It's got it all - songwriting, musicianship, originality and brilliant arrangements. The mix is a little muddy for me, but other than that, I simply can't fault it. Go figure...
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on 3 June 2006
Buy this it really great,Too many good songs to pick one... I have always been a massive fan of John Mitchell, who I feel never got the recognition he deserves...
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on 2 March 2005
Kino is the new band from "The Urbane"'s frontman John Mitchell. Although sharing some common ground with the two albums by "The Urbane" this is something very different. For those unfamilar with them, "The Urbane" are a modern style rock band in the early "Foo Fighters" and "Radiohead" theme, although Kino are a rock band as well their music seems to be more "rounded". There are so many different styles of music on this album that it is hard to describe them all. For instance, the classic opener "Loser's day parade" (I think it's about the emptiness of life on the rat race) starts with catchy agressive guitar riffs, before going into acapello style funky singing. This then returns to the original riff but this time with a guitar and then a keyboard solo over the original sound. After another bout of solo singing the song ends in a rousing repeated lyric followed by a soaring guitar solo. Most of the songs are generally "Rock" in style although each differs greatly in its style, this album is likely to draw great longevity from this. The final song is something special, a touching piano ballad which would make a good single. In conclusion this is an excellent thinking man's rock band, it's complicated yet still catchy, aggressive, and reflective in equal measure. One thing to remember, "Kino" has been touted as a "super group" due to the inclusion of the bassist from "Marillion", the keyboardist from "It-Bites" and the ex-drummer from "Porcupine tree", and the guitarist from "Arena" and "The Urbane". Fans of these bands may well buy this album for the names alone, however if you do not consider yourself a fan of these bands DO NOT WORRY, this music is strong enough to find an audience without standing on any shoulders.
13 people found this helpful
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on 27 February 2005
Kino is the new band from "The Urbane"'s frontman John Mitchell. Although sharing some common ground with the two albums by "The Urbane" this is something very different. For those unfamilar with them, "The Urbane" are a modern style rock band in the early "Foo Fighters" and "Radiohead" theme, although Kino are a rock band as well their music seems to be more "rounded". There are so many different styles of music on this album that it is hard to describe them all. For instance, the classic opener "Loser's day parade" (I think it's about the emptiness of life on the rat race) starts with catchy agressive guitar riffs, before going into acapello style funky singing. This then returns to the original riff but this time with a guitar and then a keyboard solo over the original sound. After another bout of solo singing the song ends in a rousing repeated lyric followed by a soaring guitar solo. Most of the songs are generally "Rock" in style although each differs greatly in its style, this album is likely to draw great longevity from this. The final song is something special, a touching piano ballad which would make a good single. In conclusion this is an excellent thinking man's rock band, it's complicated yet still catchy, aggressive, and reflective in equal measure. One thing to remember, "Kino" has been touted as a "super group" due to the inclusion of the bassist from "Marillion", the keyboardist from "It-Bites" and the ex-drummer from "Porcupine tree", and the guitarist from "Arena" and "The Urbane". Fans of these bands may well buy this album for the names alone, however if you do not consider yourself a fan of these bands DO NOT WORRY, this music is strong enough to stand alone. The CD ships with an excellent DVD of a live performance in Cologne. An excellent inclusion in an already excellent package!
5 people found this helpful
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on 27 February 2005
Kino is the new band from "The Urbane"'s frontman John Mitchell. Although sharing some common ground with the two albums by "The Urbane" this is something very different. For those unfamilar with them, "The Urbane" are a modern style rock band in the early "Foo Fighters" and "Radiohead" theme, although Kino are a rock band as well their music seems to be more "rounded". There are so many different styles of music on this album that it is hard to describe them all. For instance, the classic opener "Loser's day parade" (I think it's about the emptiness of life on the rat race) starts with catchy agressive guitar riffs, before going into acapello style funky singing. This then returns to the original riff but this time with a guitar and then a keyboard solo over the original sound. After another bout of solo singing the song ends in a rousing repeated lyric followed by a soaring guitar solo. Most of the songs are generally "Rock" in style although each differs greatly in its style, this album is likely to draw great longevity from this. The final song is something special, a touching piano ballad which would make a good single. In conclusion this is an excellent thinking man's rock band, it's complicated yet still catchy, aggressive, and reflective in equal measure. One thing to remember, "Kino" has been touted as a "super group" due to the inclusion of the bassist from "Marillion", the keyboardist from "It-Bites" and the ex-drummer from "Porcupine tree", and the guitarist from "Arena" and "The Urbane". Fans of these bands may well buy this album for the names alone, however if you do not consider yourself a fan of these bands DO NOT WORRY, this music is strong enough to stand alone. The CD ships with an excellent DVD of a live performance in Cologne. An excellent inclusion in an already excellent package!
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on 12 October 2006
Prog-Rock in its many forms has been in serious decline since the mid eighties suffering it seems from an image problem and labouring under that damning of all labels, "pretentiousness". Its not cool to be musicianly or to know how to play something in other than 4/4 or to want to say something lasting longer than 6 minutes. Such things are considered decidely boring and self indulgent particularly by the music press. The upshot of this kind of musical facism is that is we have a lot of bands out there who are popular in their English, parochial kind of way but have a severely limited musical vocabulary and don't travel very well.

However, the tide is slightly turning as we are seeing bands like the Mars Volta and Porcupine Tree begin to get the recogintion they deserve as musicians that are doing something original and artiscally valid both here and abroad. Kino seem to be part of this gradual upturn away from the predicatble strumming guitar combo consisting of young skinny white boys that regularly appear on the front covers of NME and alike.

But in a way Kino are hardly new, in the sense that band consist of various members and ex members of notable prog inspired bands of the past and present including It Bites, Marillion, Porcupine Tree and Arena. Suspicions might be aroused at such a combination as an opportunity for mutual ego grafication with dollops of unweildy guitar and keyboard solos and lashings of nonesensical lyrics. The result, however, I am glad to say is far from that terrifying reality. What in effect you get is a breath of fresh air. Each track is crisp, well delivered and well played - They produce an accesible sound with a slight pop sensibilty but with plenty of precison and power, mercifully free of unwordly concepts and musical flab. The album is pitch perfect with each member making a well balanced contribution to the well worked songs. Is this the future of Prog? Well, maybe, but one thinks that their advanced ages might prevent them from reaching a wide audience. Still, in the end, it is their pedigree as musicians and songwriters that count in the end and judging by the fruit of their labours this proves their vindication. Long live Prog! Highly Recommended.
4 people found this helpful
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