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4.5 out of 5 stars
50
4.5 out of 5 stars
EVERYBODY LOVES A HAPPY ENDING
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£13.17+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 4 December 2004
From the opening bars of "Everybody Loves a Happy Ending" this is pure TFF - and that's got to be a good thing. It's there, building on the sound that grew from "Songs from the Big Chair" through the temperamentally-challenged "Sowing the Seeds", a regretfully overlooked album that contained some great songs - give it another listen and see!
This new collection is full of musical references, passionately crafted songs, infectious hooks and bears the mark of that instantly recognisable TFF production and attention to detail which, ok, can border on the obsessive, but that's surely no bad thing when it results in a product as beautiful as this.
Listening to it is an experience for the head, the feet and the soul, and heaps rewards on the listener with each play. Tears For Fears don't make instantly disposable music, and there's the rub: where is it going to get played, where are you going to get to hear it?
"Closest Thing to Heaven" - as glorious a chunk of joyous intelligent pop-type stuff as you're ever likely to hear - and "Secret World" are obvious singles, but I can't see them getting on those ridiculous radio playlists. More's the pity, and it's a sad indictment of the state of our music business, because we need bands like TFF to keep the integrity in British rock music alive.We should be able to see an artist grow and develop, not get their 15 minutes of chart success then get dropped because they didn't enter the charts top 3 with a bullet. The ever growing roster of artists unable to get a contract is disturbing, to say the least.
The tragic thing is that this enjoyable and totally rewarding album could be ignored when it should be gracing each and every discerning music lover's collection. Just do yourself a big favour, go out and grab a copy - and play it to your friends/ relatives/ pets........you'll never be lonely again!
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on 14 September 2015
When Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith patched up their issues of nearly 10 years and re-united as Tears for Fears in 2000, I was one of the many hardcore fans on Cloud No.9! My dreams came true. I remember promoting Tears for Fans on Fanbase web site and even getting in touch with radio stations in India to spread the news. At the time and even now, their music means a lot to me. Then I remember listening to Roland's interview on BBC about the reunion and he was talking about the song titles for this new album and a working title- 'Everybody Loves a Happy Ending'. The first single that was released turned out to be 'Closest Thing to Heaven' which initially to my surprise was something quite ordinary and middle-of-the-road stuff. It didn't sound bad but for a band that has made songs like 'Listen' and 'Working Hour'... to be promoting a song like that as a comeback single was a bit off-putting.

I finally bought the album in late 2005. The album on the surface sounds good but on repeated listening, one would discover that this is more of a Beatles-Wings-PinkFloyd-other 60s-70s music pastiche. Maybe there is nothing wrong with it. But there is definitely a problem when anyone uses literal samples from 'A Day in the Life of...' (check out the title track), 'Come Together' ( on 'Who Killed Tangerine'), 'There She Goes' or a classic Monkees track (on 'Call Me Mellow'), '. There is nothing great about it and it is not something to be applauded if they think it is clever to do it. 'Seeds of Love' at least had some character to it although it was a Beatles pastiche and it was in context with what they were singing about as well. But here, it is like "We want to show that we can make a music album reminiscent of the late 60s and 70s if you think we are an 80s band"). As it is, to even re-create 80s music would probably have not been a good option for them (although in hindsight, that would have been far more welcome than using samples from other people's music). There was no need for Tears for Fears to do something like that given that they are talented and technically gifted musicians. They work best when they are themselves. This does shine through on great overlooked numbers such as 'The Devil', 'The Quiet Ones', 'Last Days on Earth' and the Curt Smith-Charlton Pettus penned song 'Who You Are'. Those songs are the true highlights.

The other problem is that the arrangements for all its prog-rock 'cleverness' is predictable here. On majority of the songs, you have Roland singing the lead on main verses and then Curt Smith singing the lead on choruses. Again, nothing wrong with that but for some reason because of this stolen 60s-70s psychedelia, it just becomes uninteresting. It was almost like a plan to do this rather than acting by instincts.

The album, nevertheless, is good. There are no fillers as such and many fans would find it appealing. But this is not a ground-breaking work by any means and it could so easily have been one had they followed something in the vein of Roland Orzabal's amazing solo work- 'Tomcats Screaming Outside' (released three years prior to this album) or even kind of mixed their 80s sound with something brash and new. Sadly, they didn't and I have been owning a copy of this album for nearly 10 years but I barely listen to it, these days.I love this band and have a soft spot for them. But they are much better than playing like an act with no fresh ideas and stealing- not borrowing- structures and samples of music from other bands. Ironically, on the track- 'Size of Sorrow', there is a line Curt Smith sings- 'Don't steal just borrow'.
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on 19 May 2017
Wow what an album. I have been a TFF fan sine their early records so it was with some nervousness that I put this their official comeback album on, and man the boys did not disappoint! Picking up and moving on perfectly from their last record as a duo their are so many great songs on this album that it's hard to pick out a favourite, but I already know that after just a couple of plays a large chunk of the songs from this CD have shot straight onto my list of all time great Tears for Fears songs. An absolute masterclass in great songwriting from start to finish. I'm so glad your back boys, "Bravo" and I look forward to your next album.
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on 29 September 2004
One word - WOW! 'Tears for Fears' release their first album as a duo proper for about 15 years, and it is an absolute winner. This album is dripping in 60's references, without the pretensions and over experimentation that did somewhat bring down 'The Seeds of Love' . . Beatles, Byrds, Beach Boys - it's all there, not just in style, but in the credible songwriting as well. The songs are once again the core here, and there are many a hit single on this long player if the marketing 'gurus' get off their chuffs and do their jobs. 'Closest Thing to Heaven' is the hit single that should be used to launch this long player in the UK; Standout tracks? Try all 12 on or size - from the beautiful 'Size of Sorrow' and 'Last Day', the haunting 'Tangerine', The Beatles drenched 'Who You Are', and my favourite - 'Secret World'. Do yourself and your friends a favour - spread the message - this little treasure needs to be found.
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on 29 September 2004
One word - WOW! 'Tears for Fears' release their first album as a duo proper for about 15 years, and it is an absolute winner. This album is dripping in 60's references, without the pretensions and over experimentation that did somewhat bring down 'The Seeds of Love' . . Beatles, Byrds, Beach Boys - it's all there, not just in style, but in the credible songwriting as well. The songs are once again the core here, and there are many a hit single on this long player if the marketing 'gurus' get off their chuffs and do their jobs. 'Closest Thing to Heaven' is the hit single that should be used to launch this long player in the UK; Standout tracks? Try all 12 on or size - from the beautiful 'Size of Sorrow' and 'Last Day', the haunting 'Tangerine', The Beatles drenched 'Who You Are', and my favourite - 'Secret World'. Do yourself and your friends a favour - spread the message - this little treasure needs to be found.
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on 6 April 2005
It's difficult to describe how I feel about this LP - the band's first together since the much-publicised divorce in 1992. I can however say with all certainty that this is most certainly their best offering to-date. It's never been out of my in-car CD player in all honesty, and justifyably so. Once you get around the plethora of cliches in the opening and title track it's actually a good if rather eclectic song in the mould of 'Sowing the seeds of love', peppered with Beatlesque references. My early favourite- the first single 'Closest thing to Heaven' has now made way in my affections for deeper, more lyrical songs such as the divine 'Size of sorrow' and the tuneful 'Secret World'. 'Who killed Tangerine' is pure 'Abbey Road', and 'The Devil' has a menacing title and a deep, mournful tone to it. 'Killing with kindness' is anthemic and should certainly reap a huge hit single as well as being a likely accompaniment to TV adverts and sports events with its catchy chorus. 'Ladybird' has a more retro feel to it and sounds like a lost track from 1985's 'Songs from the big chair'. The truth is every one's a little gem in its own right. MISS THIS ALBUM AT YOUR PERIL.
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on 14 May 2004
Thank goodness someone posted a pre-release of this album back in March, because its April release has been delayed in the US. So, I've been listening to ELAHE for months now and I absolutely love it!! It's got a little bit of everything - great pop songs, edgier stuff and songs that fall somewhere in between. I really think "Who You Are" could be the next "Everybody Wants to Rule the World" (if given the chance). It has that same catchy and smooth sound, like "Everbody". Other standouts are "Quiet Ones", "The Devil", "Secret World", "Killing With Kindness" and "Last Days On Earth". ELAHE may resemble TSOL from the opening tracks, but by the third song it takes on its own identity. Pure bliss. Enjoy. (Oh, and release the thing soon, Arista!!!).
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on 9 March 2005
Well I have to say that I am well impressed. Whether Roland and Curt's decision to patch up their differences and reform was fuelled by a wish to cash in on the fresh interest in their back catalogue, generated by Michael Andrew's cover of Mad World scaling the heights of Xmas number 1 in 2003, is neither here or there. For what they have contrived here is one of the most melodic and lyrically thought provoking collection of songs you will hear in many a year. The influences of Brian Wilson, The Beatles and Peter Gabriel are perhaps unsurprising, yet definately integral. The echoes of 10CC, A.R.Kane and XTC's Apple Venus volumes are certainly more unexpected, but no less welcome. There is even a hint of classic RnB about the sublime 'Last Days On Earth'. Importantly though, the biggest influence of all is Tears For Fears, both circa and post Curt. Seeds Of Love meets Elemental meets Raoul And The Kings Of Spain. One intriguing, classy and highly listenable trybrid.
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on 6 April 2006
Recently got this album after waiting for it to get cheaper... to be honest, without many expectations... for many years passed since the release of the unique 'The Seeds of Love'. Not many years however since the advent of the Rock and Pop scene in the history of music. A scene that, truth be told, in fifty years has contributed with very little to the whole of the musical universe with something that could be rightly called music. 'Everybody Loves a Happy Ending' does just that; engrose this little percentage thus keeping the MUSIC, not the music industry, alive. Sincere congratulations to Roland and Curt for this rare, shall we say, scintillating album... and many thanks for the music once again.
P.S: By the way, the album sounds more like a happy new departure rather than an ending...
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on 23 December 2016
Recommended!
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