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on 9 August 2017
A very good classic film
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on 17 March 2017
great film
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on 16 March 2017
very good enjoyed
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on 31 August 2017
At last this film has been digitally remastered and is a wide margin ahead of the earlier dvd , increasing the overall quality of a beautifully acted film.
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on 7 September 2014
Added to my black & white film collection.... Gentle storyline. ..Love it! :)
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on 26 July 2017
What it says on the tin
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on 24 August 2017
marvellous ww2 film
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VINE VOICEon 15 January 2009
If you like This Happy Breed and A Canterbury Tale you will enjoy this film, set in the middle years of the Second World War.

Patricia Roc, normally cast in more glamorous roles, plays a shy young London girl called up to do war work, but instead of the more appealing WAAF or WRNS she is assigned to a munitions factory. It might sound a dull subject at first, but the film is full of fascinating period details and deft touches of comedy as well as the more serious message that everyone had to play a part if Britain was to have any hope of survival.

There is a strong supporting cast of well-known British actors: Megs Jenkins plays a working-class Welsh girl (from a Depressed Area) with a university education, who sees the war as part of an even greater struggle for social progress. Anne Crawford portrays a spoilt débutante who finds the whole thing tiresome and does her best to contribute as little as possible short of actual sabotage, but her attitude begins to change when she becomes attracted to the factory foreman, played by Eric Portman (though not listed on the DVD cover) in his native Yorkshire accent. The heroine meanwhile has met a young Scottish airman, played by Gordon Jackson, and their shy, tentative courtship is one of the most touching aspects of the story.

The film ends on a defiant note. It was made at a time when victory was by no means certain, and the tone reflects that; but the underlying message is of hope and comradeship, and of the value and worth of ordinary people, the Millions Like Us.
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on 26 February 2007
A great film, my Mum was a war worker and found the film amazing and really moving, so close to home it brought on a few tears and many smiles of rememberance. We should not forget the work at home in the UK accepting the concept of 'Total War', all citizens, in uniform or out being fully in the fight, this film brings it home, with humour, sadness and reality. A real gem and for those who like modern history an absolute must.
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on 11 September 2016
An absolute unexpected gem of a film! Completely delightful telling the story of women herded together in an isolated location to work on munitions production to keep Britain in the war-WW2. The trials and tribulations of women from different backgrounds and class is carefully and loving exposed in this revealing heartwarming tale. Love, desperation, and loneliness are all explored as is triumph, love found and tragically lost Eric Portman is his excellent self. A good early part for Gordon Jackson, b ut the stars are the women in this Gilliat and Launder directed film. Very highly recommended for those interested in how Britain put its women to work to save Britain in its dire time of need. The women changed forever how, where and when women could work in the future anywhere in the world. These women proved for all time the value of women in any occupation! Never again would women's workplaces be restricted to nursing, teaching or office work. A revolution was silently taking place amongst the carnage of a world war!!!
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