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4.3 out of 5 stars
108
4.3 out of 5 stars
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on 2 May 2016
This is the Blu-ray début of the 1983 production of the late Tony Scott’s first feature film as a director from the Whitley Strieber novel of the same name starring the late David Bowie as John Blaylock and Catherine Deneuve as Miriam Blaylock and the love triangle is completed by Susan Sarandon as the gerontologist Sarah Roberts, this now cult classic from the 80’s in this 2015 Blu-ray release looks amazing as the print damage that was evident in the 2004 DVD release of this title is no longer an issue the blacks are more defined and the colours are brighter the Blu-ray is on a 50GB region free disc and has been encoded using MPEG4-AVC the audio track is now DTS-HD Master audio stereo whereas the DVD was in the original cinema Dolby Digital mono form

Comparing the 2004 DVD release against this 2015 issue there are some immediate noticeable differences where the DVD has three audio tracks English, French and Italian and the DVD also includes subtitles English for the hard of hearing, French, Italian, Dutch and Arabic the special features feature the original trailer a stills gallery and audio commentary from Tony Scott and Susan Sarandon, the Blu-ray release only features the trailer and audio commentary from Tony and Susan.

If you can find this at a reasonable price on import it is a worthy up-grade from the earlier DVD release.
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on 15 June 2013
THE HUNGER 1983 DVD 2004

Back in the 1980s I replaced most of my collection of 8mm movies with VHS and I have been going through a same process of upgrading to DVD for the last two or three years. This has given me the excuse to watch many films that I have not seen for some time and this stylish vampire movie from the great Tony Scott is one that I have recently revisited.

The film stars the fabulous Catherine Deneuve and David Bowie in a role that I believe to be one of his best performances as an actor, as vampires living in modern day (1983) New York, in a luxurious state of bored longevity, but even vampires do not live forever and the story plots the anguish as one of the partners begins to age and the other needs to find a new companion. The plot is unhurried but has sufficient momentum to keep the viewer interested and there are surprises and twists enough to please.

This is one of my favourites of the modern vampire genre and is probably the film which most influenced the development of the vampire cult movies and television series of the 1990s.
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on 30 May 2017
What a really good film - Bowie was so sensual - charismatic - just pure him
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on 20 March 2017
classic 80's cinema, super stylish and worth a watch
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on 5 June 2016
I enjoyed this movie it's a good story all the actors are at there best. Darkly atmospheric theme. I got it mainly because David Bowie was in it.
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on 16 April 2017
This is a BD gift which will go down well.
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on 5 June 2017
Great film.watched it years back & its still as good!
David bowie very good at his part, & Catherine deneauve is stunning!
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on 28 May 2017
Excellent film
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on 2 November 2009
I really ejoyed the style and looks of this movie, but the sound quality is so frustrating! Most of the time I had the volume up at max - and yes I have pretty sharp hearing - but I still had to struggle to make out the dialogue. This was the case on the old video, so I guess it was unrealistic to hope for better.
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on 20 August 2012
The sad news of Tony Scott's suicide yesterday has led to the expected praise of many of his action movies like Crimson Tide and Top Gun, but his debut, the cult vampire movie The Hunger, has actually aged pretty well too. I bought it a month ago to replace an ageing VHS copy. It was widely derided upon it's release in 1983 as glossy and over-stylised (rather like brother Ridley's reviews for Blade Runner when that film opened), a vacuous soft-porn horror that made Catherine Deneuve do things the great actress shouldn't have been made to do. The film tells of two New Yorkers, John and Miriam Blaylock, who live in luxury and crave blood. Miriam (Deneuve) is an old vampire (although the term vampire is never mentioned) who goes back to Egyptian times. John (a rather good David Bowie) is the latest in her line of lovers who never seem to get beyond a few hundred years before rapidly ageing, although cursed to immortal life. This starts to happen to Bowie and brings the pair into contact with a young doctor, Sarah (Susan Sarandon), who is studying premature ageing in apes in a New York hospital. The bisexual Miriam is instantly attracted to her and sees her as a successor to John.

It's not a long film (90mins) and a sub-plot involving a cop investigating a missing person could have been expanded to add a little more tension to the situation the Blaylock's find themselves in at the expense of some rather extended sections in the hospital. Certainly compared to the stunningly edited first 6 or so mins, including the opening nightclub scene featuring Peter Murphy and his band Bauhaus, it moves rather slowly therafter. But the film has stayed visually stunning and its looks have not dated, though perhaps there's a bit too much billowing curtain (even in the attic) which leads to comparisons with TV adverts. Deneuve looks gorgeous throughout, dressed in a sort of 1940/50s style most of the time, all sharp couture, sharper hairstyles and veiled hats; Bowie acquits himself well and the make-up job as he ages is still one of the best, and Sarandon smokes her way through her confusion as Miriam weaves her spell on her (its surprising looking back how much smoking goes on in this film, even among the medics at her hospital!). It's also a film that is well-integrated with it's music score, mixing Ravel and Schubert with some effective synth squeals from David Lawson.

The DVD has a good stills gallery and an audio commentary from Sarandon and Scott. It is clear to me that The Hunger has undoubtedly had an effect on later vampire films or TV series (think about Channel 4's excellent Ultraviolet, with it's depiction of the threat called "Code V" - never vampirism - and it's attention to the blood biochemistry detail, or Being Human's differentiation between the younger vampires and The Old Ones). Remember Tony Scott with his action films for sure, but dont overlook this excellent and subtle horror debut either.
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