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4.2 out of 5 stars
39
4.2 out of 5 stars
Format: DVD|Change
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on 28 November 2010
this is just a mash up of blue planet footage if you own blue planet already don't waste your money on this and if you don't you should seriously save up the extra money to get that.
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on 17 September 2005
This is a wonderfully enjoyable way to spend 80 minutes. A film with very limited narration, focusing instead on the drama and violence of life in the world's largest, most turbulent and least understood habitat. I am an enthusiastic viewer of natural history films, amd this is a very different and very rewarding change from the usual. There is one major problem with this piece, and that is the sound - it is inconsistent in volume, and occasionally distracting, but the score itself is well-written and beautifully performed, and I absolutely do not agree that it detracts from the film in any fundamental way. Other than the sound issue, this is a superb release.
The camerawork is exemplary - the visuals are vivid and beautiful, and with subject matter this captivating, this DVD contains some of the most stunning images ever captured of the ocean and it's animal and plant life. The editing of the film is superb too - the impression is that you are a silent, passive observer in a strange and dangerous world - the action unfolds without any hint of human interaction, and this creates a real sense of immersion. Some of the footage here is simply breath-taking, and I mean that literally - including a pack of sharks in a feeding frenzy on the ocean floor, and a seal being flung a hundred feet into the air by a killer whale - this is powerful, dramatic stuff.
There is almost no narration at all, and this makes a great change - there is a tremendous range of documentary material available, some of it brilliantly informative and educational, but this film speaks for itself, and more narration would simply lessen the experience. Previous reviewers stated that some of the footage from "The Blue Planet" has simply been recycled here without narration - that is true, and it is stunning footage, all the better without mandatory education over the top of it! "The Blue Planet" is a superb documentary - much more informative, and more complete in scope, but the aim of this DVD is clearly very different, and I believe that it is successful and worthwhile.
This is a powerful, moving journey through the oceans of the world - visually stunning, dramatic - it will leave a great impression on you. At this price, I recommend it to anyone with an interest in the natural world.
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on 22 November 2006
I have the 4-disc set of the Blue Planet which I love and bought after reading the commentary here. Funny thing, although I love the series, I find myself wanting to buy or watch Deep Blue again. Most (probably all) of the footage is from the series but I find I like the juxtapositions of the images and the sparseness of commentary better here. In all fairness, the curiousity about what I was looking at spurred my buying Blue Planet which does a fine job of explaining the details but watching this film is more of an emotional experience. It is a paean to the oceans and their denizens in all their splendor, otherness and even frightfulness. I came away with a strong desire to engage myself more fully in supporting measures to protect this treasure.

Caveat for parents of young and/or sensitive children: my 7 year old daughter, who loves Willy, was appalled by the scenes of killer whales snatching baby sea lions from the beach and drowning a baby grey whale while its mother helplessly hovered near. She was in tears, said she HATED the whales now and makes me skip that part. You will need to able to explain carnivores and their place in the world.

Favorite scene? Seeing the animals that depend on herring all together in a gorgeous multi-textured underwater shot (a good argument for over-priced large screen TVs if ever there was one): I was blown away!

See it for yourself.
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on 10 September 2006
This is a wonderfully enjoyable way to spend 80 minutes. A film with very limited narration, focusing instead on the drama and violence of life in the world's largest, most turbulent and least understood habitat. I am an enthusiastic viewer of natural history films, amd this is a very different and very rewarding change from the usual. There is one major problem with this piece, and that is the sound - it is inconsistent in volume, and occasionally distracting, but the score itself is well-written and beautifully performed, and I absolutely do not agree that it detracts from the film in any fundamental way. Other than the sound issue, this is a superb release.
The camerawork is exemplary - the visuals are vivid and beautiful, and with subject matter this captivating, this DVD contains some of the most stunning images ever captured of the ocean and it's animal and plant life. The editing of the film is superb too - the impression is that you are a silent, passive observer in a strange and dangerous world - the action unfolds without any hint of human interaction, and this creates a real sense of immersion. Some of the footage here is simply breath-taking, and I mean that literally - including a pack of sharks in a feeding frenzy on the ocean floor, and a seal being flung a hundred feet into the air by a killer whale - this is powerful, dramatic stuff.

There is almost no narration at all, and this makes a great change - there is a tremendous range of documentary material available, some of it brilliantly informative and educational, but this film speaks for itself, and more narration would simply lessen the experience. Previous reviewers stated that some of the footage from "The Blue Planet" has simply been recycled here without narration - that is true, and it is stunning footage, all the better without mandatory education over the top of it! "The Blue Planet" is a superb documentary - much more informative, and more complete in scope, but the aim of this DVD is clearly very different, and I believe that it is successful and worthwhile.

This is a powerful, moving journey through the oceans of the world - visually stunning, dramatic - it will leave a great impression on you, and if ever you needed an environmental wake-up call, then this is it. At this price, I recommend it to anyone with an interest in the natural world.
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on 18 September 2005
I watched this on TV with my 3 year old son. As those with experience of children will appreciate, the fact the it held his full attention for a full hour is testament to how enchanting it is.
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on 28 August 2005
No, you won't hear someone droning on about the dimentions of a manta ray's molars - plenty of other run-of-the-mill documentaries for that.
What you do get is some of the most breath-taking filming you could wish for - absolutely masterful and artistic scenes which must have taken months to catch just right.
Perhaps I had an unfair advantage watching on a wide screen tv - if you have one of those and an ounce of music in your soul - buy this!
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on 26 August 2006
This is a beautifully filmed and scored documentary with a lyrical - if exiguous - commentary. I found it ultimately frustrating, however, and even a little dull, because of the lack of information. For each scene I found myself wondering where I was, what creatures I was seeing, what time of year it was, why were they behaving as shown and a score of other questions.

Seeing this has inspired me to get David Attenborough's documentaries for my children; they are as well or better filmed and give you far more information.
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on 18 July 2006
I love watching this video simply to enjoy the beauty in our planet's oceans. I would have liked more information on the animals, though (i.e. what species, where they live, what they eat, etc. general information) I saw a LOT of animals on this video that I thought to myself "wow look at THAT! I wonder what it is."

I would give it another star if only there was more information.

Otherwise, this movie is simply amazing. No other words to describe how well put together this video is. Great job!
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on 5 October 2005
We live on a planet called Earth. This film is a reminder that the name should really be Water, because that's what covers most of the planet. There is more life in the sea than on land, and this film is a celebration of it. It makes the point that more men have landed on the moon than have ever ventured into the deepest depths of the ocean (in the latter case, I think the number is precisely two).
Unlike most natural history films, this one does not set out to teach you anything (unless the lesson is simply the beauty and fecundity of the oceans, at which it succeeds admirably). It is pure visual spectacle - and what a spectacle! The images are of stunning beauty, sometimes almost surreal in their impact. In addition to just drinking them in, I spent a large part of my time thinking, "How on earth did they take THAT?" Some of the footage is obviously computer-generated (the mid-ocean ridges and chasms, where it's pitch-black and you couldn't possibly see what you're shown), and I wondered about some of the deep sea angler fish shots, but most of it equally clearly isn't. Some of the illuminated deep sea fish look like refugees from Spielberg's "Close Encounters".
I gave this film four stars rather than five, because I would have liked more explanation of what I was seeing. The commentary is minimal, which admittedly does have the advantage of letting you dwell on the magnificent images with which you're presented. The most telling bit of commentary comes at the end, when it is said that there remain only a few thousand blue whales, the biggest creature that has ever lived on earth. We are plundering and polluting a world that we barely understand. If this film doesn't turn you into a conservationist, desiring to preserve forever the beauty of this watery world, you are dead.
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on 6 September 2005
I'm not usually one for nature programmes, but I was entranced by this. This piece of film making is absolutely stunning. There is no need for gimmicks and the (very brief) voice over by Michael Gambon gives just about the right amount of basic information. The shots, of underwater monsters, shoals, killings, and 'firework' fish speak for themselves and are only enhanced by the wonderful music. This shows the natural world at its most beautiful.
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