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4.5 out of 5 stars
50
4.5 out of 5 stars
Thunder, Lightning Strike
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£4.97+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 22 April 2017
fast - good value, great!
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on 8 October 2004
Having only heard Bottle Rocket when i brought this album, I wasn't sure what to expect.
However, if you're looking for an album to get you going in the morning or cheer you up on a rainy day you woudl be hard pushed to find a better album than this for the job.
Ladyflash, Bottle Rocket, and The Power Is On are all cut and paste numbers in the Avalanche style. However, the music is more layered and joyfully hectic with a real sense of it being compiled live.
The album also flirts with acid jazz and more laid back electronica but it pretty much unclassifiable.
If you want something different and music that will excite you over and over again (i've now listened to the album everyday for the past week since i bought it) then you really should check this out.
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on 25 November 2005
I resisted buying this album for a long time as I wrongly judged this to be a fairly unoriginal concept. In fact, on paper, it still is an unoriginal concept - a heady mash-up of 70s samples and breaks - but it is pulled off by a verve and audacity lacking in many of the Brighton collective's contemporaries. Opener 'Panther Dash' pitches Dick Dale-style thrashed surf guitar against frenetic live drumming, harmonica and police sirens. It doesn't sound so much like a song, but rather an opening credit sequence to a Tarrantino movie. That is part of the pleasure of the album as a whole. The production is rough and cluttered, bursting with the 'in between' static and distortion of the samples, that gives it a more organic feeling than if the production was otherwise cleaned up. 'Ladyflash' sounds more obviously like the Avalanches in this respect, but in the Australians' extended absence, this is the best thing they never did. 'Feelgood by Numbers' uses ramshackle piano to evoke its dislocated summertime atmospherics, while 'The Power is On' is a true original - looped cheerleader chants and heavy breaks reaching a near psychedlic cacophony of sound (a trick repeated later on 'Huddle Formation'). Unfortunately the album's quieter moments are also its weakest points, and you feel that the Go! Team need to develop a more sophisticated mellower side to counterbalance the awesome head-rush of the heavier ones. However, overall the sound is much greater than a sum of its parts and is not to be confused with the lame big beat of late 90s acts like Bentley Rythmn Ace.
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on 15 September 2004
I've been on the lookout for this since the singles Ladyflash and Junior Kickstart. This album doesn't dissappoint on any level. Though short (comes in at 35 mins) i challenge anyone not to play it at least 4 times before it leaves your player.
Using the cut-and-paste techniques familiar to Avalanches fans, The Go! Team up the ante considerably, with mental drumming, live horns and a peculiarly english, brian-cant-fan-grew-up-in-the-seventies type of nostalgia drippping all over it.
Go! get it now!
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on 27 August 2005
It doesn't matter whether The Go! Team are neo-electronica-pop band, or pseudo-post-punk-neo-soul-rock, or whatever multi-hyphenated genre the NME and similar publications wish to squeeze them into. What matters is that this is the most enjoyable record you will hear this year.
This is hectic music with things happening all over the place and with scant regard for the consequences, which has managed to perfectly capture the feeling of being 8 years old and being gvien all your favourite sweets at once and being allowed to stay up all night. Instead of "proper" music, this band seem to have taken most of their inspiration from the theme songs to the sort of larger than life programs that are on ludicrously early on a saturday morning e.g the A team or Thunderbirds, and this has resulted in a stunningly consistent album that is an absolute oy to listen to from start to finish.
There is certinaly a lot of musical innovation in this record, The Go! Team combine instruments and electronics in some wonderful ways, and pull lo-fi producton out of it's traditional post-punk stomping ground with style and panache. They combine joyous melodies and superb arrangements with easily the best rhythm section in the current set of pop groups. Personally however, I think that he most refreshing thing about The Go! Team is their approach; instead of trying to be cool and cultivate a slick public face this band is clearly just doing what it does for fun, but at the same time doing so very well, they can therefore benefit from the best of both worlds; they pour effort and love into each song, and they can actually play their instruments.
I can not recommend this album enough: it is one of the most innovative records this year, while maintaining a wonderfully honest and playful approach throughout, which exemplifies the very best qualities of pop music.
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on 18 June 2005
The Go! Team are actually a collective of musicans from the UK, but you would think 'Thunder Lightning Strike' was the product of a think-tank of production wizards pushing rock-based electronica to it's highest level. This in fact isn't electronica, but it does embody that same inventiveness to create dense sheets of sound. 'Thunder Lightning Strike' combines the infectious melodies of 70's soundtracks, everything from TV programs, commercials, to Schoohouse Rock. But don't let this fool you, this CD still rocks, self-contained energy unleashed as animated pastiches of sound. The album is sprinkled with music-confection, eg, bouncy pianos, horns, and harmonica, almost like the playful spirit of Japanese pop/rock meeting big-beat artists like The Chemical Brothers and The Propellerheads. The template is much like The Avalanches, but more intoxicating, fusing 70's orchestral kistch with rock swagger. Probe a little further and you'll detect hints of jazz/lounge film-scores, electronic grooves of Lemon Jelly, quirky turntablism of Cornelius, and the gung-ho chants of Bis. Running at just under 40 minutes, 'Thunder Lightning Strike' was the only release that actually made me stand-up and take notice. Innovative, lush, dynamic, and just plain brilliant. Never heard of this? Now you have. It's your turn to take a listen.
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on 11 October 2005
A cursory glance over the titles on Thunder, Lightning, Strike will give you some idea of the mood in The Go! Team camp: Feelgood By Numbers, Junior Kickstart, Everyone's A VIP To Someone, Friendship Update. These are punchy and positive celebrations of life, fusing a little '80s breakbeat and '70s funk with a big slice of the kind of 1960s soul that is such a big part of David Holmes' record collection. Add to that a school music lesson charm - the vocals on The Power Is On may well have been recorded in a playground, Get It Together employs the much overlooked recorder - and you're time travelling on one of the most upbeat journeys you'll find on CD.
It's almost entirely instrumental, which makes for a refreshing change - until you hear the wonderful Cookie Crew-esque rap over the lively circus fanfare of Bottle Rocket and start to wonder how it might have been even more fun with an extra voice or two.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 22 July 2005
The Go! Team might just have one of the catchiest albums of the year, "Thunder Lightning Strike." Definitely the catchiest of the summer. Despite the current wave of nu-Manchester or new wave bands that are popping up, this Brighton band dips into a different musical well.

Their unique sound is made up of sunshine funk, big beats, peculiar samples, adrenaline-pumping rock, TV theme songs and the occasional cheerleader. (Yes, cheerleader) It opens with a charged trashcan drum song, "Panther Dash," before slipping into a series of funky, blippy grooves.

Those sounds run through the entire album, alternating between hyperkinetic rock'n'roll and colorful electronic big beats. It's all jammed with harmonica, horn, what sounds like a sitar, and hip-hop flourishes. And whatever style it is, it's danceable from beginning to end, densely packed with fun beats and wild rhythms.

In fact, it's hard to find a part of "Thunder Lightning Strike" that isn't packed with at least two kinds of sound at once. In fact, it sounds like they gathered every single instrument they could get their hands on, dosed them with Red Bull and planted them in front of a bunch of 1970s TV shows. That retro sound isn't a gimmick, however -- even if you don't have nostalgia for that TV era, the sound is wildly entertaining.

Their hyperdrivin' guitars might sound repetitive, if they didn't have lots of samples and extra instrumentation thrown in, including blaring trumpets and some explosive drums. And the flourishes range from glockenspiel to horns to harmonica. Without them, the music would seem a little too bare and ordinary.

And cheerleaders, of course -- there are some rousing cheerleader chants, exploding from the foot-stomping "Huddle Formation" and playfully chaotic "The Power Is On." It sounds like a football-game-turned-rave, with just the right amount of energetic messiness.

Imagine the Propellerheads on a sunny day, and you have the basic sound of the Go! Team. "Thunder Lightning Strike" -- perfect for summer partying.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 25 February 2007
The Go! Team turn out one of the catchiest albums in recent memory, "Thunder Lightning Strike." When it first came out, definitely the catchiest of the summertime. Despite the current wave of nu-Manchester or new wave bands that are popping up, this Brighton band dips into a different musical well.

Their unique sound is made up of sunshine funk, big beats, peculiar samples, adrenaline-pumping rock, TV theme songs and the occasional cheerleader. (Yes, cheerleader) It opens with a charged trashcan drum song, "Panther Dash," before slipping into a series of funky, blippy grooves.

Those sounds run through the entire album, alternating between hyperkinetic rock'n'roll and colorful electronic big beats. It's all jammed with harmonica, horn, what sounds like a sitar, and hip-hop flourishes. And whatever style it is, it's danceable from beginning to end, densely packed with fun beats and wild rhythms.

In fact, it's hard to find a part of "Thunder Lightning Strike" that isn't packed with at least two kinds of sound at once. In fact, it sounds like they gathered every single instrument they could get their hands on, dosed them with Red Bull and planted them in front of a bunch of 1970s TV shows. That retro sound isn't a gimmick, however -- even if you don't have nostalgia for that TV era, the sound is wildly entertaining.

Their hyperdrivin' guitars might sound repetitive, if they didn't have lots of samples and extra instrumentation thrown in, including blaring trumpets and some explosive drums. And the flourishes range from glockenspiel to horns to harmonica. Without them, the music would seem a little too bare and ordinary.

And cheerleaders, of course -- there are some rousing cheerleader chants, exploding from the foot-stomping "Huddle Formation" and playfully chaotic "The Power Is On." It sounds like a football-game-turned-rave, with just the right amount of energetic messiness.

Imagine the Propellerheads on a sunny day, and you have the basic sound of the Go! Team. "Thunder Lightning Strike" -- perfect for a party or a wild night.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 7 March 2007
The Go! Team might just have one of the catchiest albums of the year, "Thunder Lightning Strike." Definitely the catchiest of the summer. Despite the current wave of nu-Manchester or new wave bands that are popping up, this Brighton band dips into a different musical well.

Their unique sound is made up of sunshine funk, big beats, peculiar samples, adrenaline-pumping rock, TV theme songs and the occasional cheerleader. (Yes, cheerleader) It opens with a charged trashcan drum song, "Panther Dash," before slipping into a series of funky, blippy grooves.

Those sounds run through the entire album, alternating between hyperkinetic rock'n'roll and colorful electronic big beats. It's all jammed with harmonica, horn, what sounds like a sitar, and hip-hop flourishes. And whatever style it is, it's danceable from beginning to end, densely packed with fun beats and wild rhythms.

In fact, it's hard to find a part of "Thunder Lightning Strike" that isn't packed with at least two kinds of sound at once. In fact, it sounds like they gathered every single instrument they could get their hands on, dosed them with Red Bull and planted them in front of a bunch of 1970s TV shows. That retro sound isn't a gimmick, however -- even if you don't have nostalgia for that TV era, the sound is wildly entertaining.

Their hyperdrivin' guitars might sound repetitive, if they didn't have lots of samples and extra instrumentation thrown in, including blaring trumpets and some explosive drums. And the flourishes range from glockenspiel to horns to harmonica. Without them, the music would seem a little too bare and ordinary.

And cheerleaders, of course -- there are some rousing cheerleader chants, exploding from the foot-stomping "Huddle Formation" and playfully chaotic "The Power Is On." It sounds like a football-game-turned-rave, with just the right amount of energetic messiness.

Imagine the Propellerheads on a sunny day, and you have the basic sound of the Go! Team. "Thunder Lightning Strike" -- perfect for summer partying.
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