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4.4 out of 5 stars
41
4.4 out of 5 stars
Format: Audio CD|Change
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on 15 June 2017
Interesting to compare with my 1981 version. The most indispensable Cd in my large collection.
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on 24 August 2017
I do not hate this recording,as indicated by a single star rating,as I have not been able to hear it ! The CD I have received does not play on any device and is not recognised by them. I have asked friends and colleagues to try to play it and they all report the same problem. In this case, silence is not golden.
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on 9 August 2017
Good recording for its time and superb playing
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on 22 July 2015
I now know what people were getting at, this is the way to listen to Bach.
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on 30 July 2017
Arrived safely - thank you
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on 11 April 2013
Wonderful recording and a great artist's interpretation of one of the greatest baroque composers of all time. Highly recommend to all Bach enthusiasts
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on 18 April 2009
Bach's keyboard music can take so many styles and approaches, but none can better Glen Gould's original touch and manner.
He is genius, and seems to have J.S. Bach's ear for phrasing and expression and a great love of his music.
He can however be heard humming to himself as he plays at one or two points.
This does not actually detract from the performance but emphasizes his "empathy".
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on 19 November 2008
If I must choose three recordings of solo piano music which deserve the word 'awe-inspiring', my first choice is this recording of Goldberg Variations by Glenn Gould, second choice is Richter's Well-tempered Klavier (Bach - The Well-tempered Clavier, Books 1 & 2) and the third is Glenn Gould's 1981 recording of Goldberg Variations. Like Rony O'sullivan's 147 in 5 minutes 20 second, I don't think anyone can surpass this 1955 recording by Gould as long as mankind lives on, on this planet!

If you can actually watch how he plays the work on DVD (Glenn Gould - The Goldberg Variations [1981]), you will be even more amazed!!
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on 23 September 2008
This is a truly iconic disc, the legendary performance that introduced an eccentric Canadian pianist to the world at large. Gould had made a sensational debut in New York with a programme that included Beethoven's Op 109 sonate, a Sweelinck fantasia and the Webern variations. Snapped up by a CBS talent scout, he requested his first release should be Bach's Goldberg Variations, a seldom performed work the Leipzig cantor wrote for an aristocratic insomniac. As the recording took place, Gould sat on his pigmy stool, swaying, groaning, humming and playing like a god. Inbetween takes he popped pills, donned his overcoat and ate arrowroot biscuits washed down with spring water as the press gathered curiously to see the spectacle. The resulting LP sold 40,000 copies, redefined Bach playing and made Gould an instant star. Today, with many more fine recordings of the work, this is still the one that sets the benchmark. Invest and be dazzled by some of the greatest and most exciting piano playing ever committed to disc.
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on 9 December 2008
Glenn Gould's first recording of the Goldberg Variations is fresh and vibrant. Apparently Bach wrote the music as a kind of extended lullaby, but I've never yet managed to sleep through any of this recording. (Gould's later recording, from 1981, is more soothing.)

On this disk there are also two fugues from the Well Tempered Clavier. I think of the E major fugue (BWV 878) as a kind of ultimate idea of fugue: if someone wants to know what a fugue is, this is what they need to hear. Gould takes the E major fugue rather quickly in his recording of the whole of the Well Tempered Clavier, but the recording on this disk is slow and clear and wonderfully resonant.
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