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VINE VOICEon 16 May 2005
I heard Sons and Daughters on XFM and then was lucky enough to see them at the 100 Club only a few days later (11/05/05). They bristled with energy and passion and played a great set of highly danceable numbers. Shortly after I bought Love the Cup from Amazon and was pleased to see that the same energy was to be heard on this, their first album. They seem influenced by music I know and love and have grown up with (the likes of New Model Army and Nick Cave) and it's great to see a modern band embrace such a seedy Southern and brassy Celtic flavour. I know I'll definitely be seeing them live again and playing this album over and over. The only negative point I can offer is that their strong Scottish accents are sometimes a little difficult to understand (for this soft southern English sassenach, anyway) and a lyric sheet would have been much appreciated (if only to fully appreciate where their songs are truly coming from). A great album, though, and highly recommended by myself.
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Sons and Daughters have performed with some pretty big names in indie rock, with Decemberists, the Fiery Furnaces and fellow Scots Franz Ferdinand. What do these bands have in common? Aside from sharing a nationality with Franz Ferdinand.... absolutely nothing.

This energetic Scottish band debuted with "Love the Cup," which let the world have a taste of their music, with the energy of a volcanic garage band and the infectious sound of Celtic folk gone punk. There really isn't any other band with a comparable sound.

It kicks off with a dancing drum beat, joined by a droning guitar and sinuous female vocals. "Fight" levels out into a sort of bombastic folk that is rough, dancey and intense, enough that getting into it is exhausting. Yes, as you can guess, it's about a fight. But somehow it never sounded so appealing.

They quiet down a bit from there on, but that simmering sound is always about ready to erupt. No, "Johnny Cash" sounds nothing like the late man in black's work, and it doesn't focus on him, but it is the peak of this album -- tightly played, with razor-sharp guitars and explosive singing by Scott Paterson.

A few songs even reflect the Celtic folk roots of this band, with soft acoustic guitar, mandolin and a tambourine. Guitarist/singer Adele Bethel sounds softer and more relaxed in these songs. Then it's back to the bluesy, folky rock'n'roll, whisky-soaked and ready to throw a punch.

It's a long EP, and well-worth buying for the price tag it has, since every song here is worth listening to. "Love the Cup" has no fillers, no cutesiness, no pretensions, no trends, and no slick appeals for radioplay. It's just a rough, raw slice of rock'n'roll.

Anyone who has heard Celtic folk will recognize the jiggy rhythms that make you want to dance, with handclaps, sharp drums and fast riffs. But this is not cheery music, with its sparsely-worded lyrics about fighting, death and melancholy. It's ominous and rough, and it makes you feel that way even as you tap your feet to it.

This is also one of those bands that harmonizes male and female vocals. Bethel is paired with Paterson, who usually does backing harmony. He does lead in one song, with Bethel bursting in in the middle. And harmonization becomes dizzying as they sing "You're in my blood/blood/my blood," their voices interplaying beautifully.

Anyone who loves raw, pure rock'n'roll will be bowled over by the debut EP for Sons and Daughters. "Love the Cup"? Oh yeah, lads and lasses.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 25 September 2004
I first encountered Sons and Daughters supporting Franz Ferdinand, and have probably listened to this album quite a few times more than that of the headliners.
Although only 25 minutes, and seven tracks, long, 'Love the Cup' has given me much greater value for money than many 'proper, full-length' releases. From start to end (to quote the band) it's a minor masterpiece of music, a breath of fresh air in the indie scene and music in general.
Reminiscent of the likes of New Model Army, with its Scottish folk influences and military drumbeat, it's hugely engrossing music and bodes well for a proper, full length record.
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 August 2004
I first witnessed this band supporting Franz Ferdinand and they just blew me away, i was straight off to buy this cd, which also just blew me away!
All the songs on 'Love The Cup' fit perfectly together, the slow building repeating of 'Start To End' to the complete burst of brilliance that is 'Johnny Cash' which is a song we should all be allowed to hear.
The Vocals are so undoubtably Scottish as well which is a beautiful thing to hear for a change, you can only take so much of that american drawl so good on Adele Bethel and David Gow.
Buy this now and then cry that you have to wait to hear a new album cos you wont be able to wait!
0Comment| 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Sons and Daughters have performed with some pretty big names in indie rock, with Decemberists, the Fiery Furnaces and fellow Scots Franz Ferdinand. What do these bands have in common? Aside from sharing a nationality with Franz Ferdinand.... absolutely nothing.

This energetic Scottish band debuted with "Love the Cup," which let the world have a taste of their music, with the energy of a volcanic garage band and the infectious sound of Celtic folk gone punk. There really isn't any other band with a comparable sound.

It kicks off with a dancing drum beat, joined by a droning guitar and sinuous female vocals. "Fight" levels out into a sort of bombastic folk that is rough, dancey and intense, enough that getting into it is exhausting. Yes, as you can guess, it's about a fight. But somehow it never sounded so appealing.

They quiet down a bit from there on, but that simmering sound is always about ready to erupt. No, "Johnny Cash" sounds nothing like the late man in black's work, and it doesn't focus on him, but it is the peak of this album -- tightly played, with razor-sharp guitars and explosive singing by Scott Paterson.

A few songs even reflect the Celtic folk roots of this band, with soft acoustic guitar, mandolin and a tambourine. Guitarist/singer Adele Bethel sounds softer and more relaxed in these songs. Then it's back to the bluesy, folky rock'n'roll, whisky-soaked and ready to throw a punch.

It's a long EP, and well-worth buying for the price tag it has, since every song here is worth listening to. "Love the Cup" has no fillers, no cutesiness, no pretensions, no trends, and no slick appeals for radioplay. It's just a rough, raw slice of rock'n'roll.

Anyone who has heard Celtic folk will recognize the jiggy rhythms that make you want to dance, with handclaps, sharp drums and fast riffs. But this is not cheery music, with its sparsely-worded lyrics about fighting, death and melancholy. It's ominous and rough, and it makes you feel that way even as you tap your feet to it.

This is also one of those bands that harmonizes male and female vocals. Bethel is paired with Paterson, who usually does backing harmony. He does lead in one song, with Bethel bursting in in the middle. And harmonization becomes dizzying as they sing "You're in my blood/blood/my blood," their voices interplaying beautifully.

Anyone who loves raw, pure rock'n'roll will be bowled over by the debut EP for Sons and Daughters. "Love the Cup"? Oh yeah, lads and lasses.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Sons and Daughters have performed with some pretty big names in indie rock, with Decemberists, the Fiery Furnaces and fellow Scots Franz Ferdinand. What do these bands have in common? Aside from sharing a nationality with Franz Ferdinand.... absolutely nothing.
This energetic Scottish band debuted with "Love the Cup," which let the world have a taste of their music, with the energy of a volcanic garage band and the infectious sound of Celtic folk gone punk. There really isn't any other band with a comparable sound.
It kicks off with a dancing drum beat, joined by a droning guitar and sinuous female vocals. "Fight" levels out into a sort of bombastic folk that is rough, dancey and intense, enough that getting into it is exhausting. Yes, as you can guess, it's about a fight. But somehow it never sounded so appealing.
They quiet down a bit from there on, but that simmering sound is always about ready to erupt. No, "Johnny Cash" sounds nothing like the late man in black's work, and it doesn't focus on him, but it is the peak of this album -- tightly played, with razor-sharp guitars and explosive singing by Scott Paterson.
A few songs even reflect the Celtic folk roots of this band, with soft acoustic guitar, mandolin and a tambourine. Guitarist/singer Adele Bethel sounds softer and more relaxed in these songs. Then it's back to the bluesy, folky rock'n'roll, whisky-soaked and ready to throw a punch.
It's a long EP, and well-worth buying for the price tag it has, since every song here is worth listening to. "Love the Cup" has no fillers, no cutesiness, no pretensions, no trends, and no slick appeals for radioplay. It's just a rough, raw slice of rock'n'roll.
Anyone who has heard Celtic folk will recognize the jiggy rhythms that make you want to dance, with handclaps, sharp drums and fast riffs. But this is not cheery music, with its sparsely-worded lyrics about fighting, death and melancholy. It's ominous and rough, and it makes you feel that way even as you tap your feet to it.
This is also one of those bands that harmonizes male and female vocals. Bethel is paired with Paterson, who usually does backing harmony. He does lead in one song, with Bethel bursting in in the middle. And harmonization becomes dizzying as they sing "You're in my blood/blood/my blood," their voices interplaying beautifully.
Anyone who loves raw, pure rock'n'roll will be bowled over by the debut EP for Sons and Daughters. "Love the Cup"? Oh yeah, lads and lasses.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 November 2005
I first heard Sons and Daughters at a local bar and immediately bought their cd. Its filled with intelligent, engaging and raw music with something to say for itself. It provides a good listen, and I fully recommend it for anyone who likes Franz Ferdinand, Gomez or even Garbage. Watch out for the mandolins...
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 June 2004
This is a trully exceptionall album.
It hasn't been out of my car stereo since december.
Johnny Cash and Blood are amazing!!!!!!
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on 8 February 2015
What a superb CD. More than off-the-wall enough to be of continuing interest. 'Awkward Duet' makes my knees drip.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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