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4.6 out of 5 stars
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4.6 out of 5 stars


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on 2 April 2017
excellent
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on 26 April 2017
Perfect 👍
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on 8 June 2013
Thoroughly enjoyed these old Thames t.v. horror plays and if you like this sort of thing check out "Haunted" "Beasts" and "The Green Man" amongst others.
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on 21 December 2013
I remember being frightened to death when these were first broadcast, but couldn't wait for the next one! So sad that so many episodes have been lost. A great series.
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on 14 January 2016
Unfortunately, all the best episodes have been lost! Notable among these was "The Listener" which seemed to capture the atmosphere of the original Algernon Blackwood story perfectly- and when the ghost of the lion-faced leper appeared, just unbelievably horrific! Probably couldn't be shown on TV today.
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on 19 May 2017
Very good
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on 14 October 2009
Mystery And Imagination was a British TV series that ran from 1966 to 1970 and comprised of 24 episodes. Sadly only eight of these episodes have survived, all of which are present in this collection. The series was made by ITV. Each drama was a horror or supernatural tale based on works by well-known 19th century writers such as Bram Stoker, Mary Shelly, Robert Louis Stevenson, Sheridan Le Fanu and Edgar Allan Poe.

This is what is on each disc.

Disc One -
Uncle Silas (1968) black and white, 80 minutes
Frankenstein (1968) black and white, 80 minutes
Gallery - featuring colour pictures (includes those from lost episodes)

Disc Two -
Dracula (1968) black and white, 80 minutes
The Suicide Club (1970) colour, 80 minutes

Disc Three -
Sweeney Todd (1970) colour, 80 minutes
Curse Of The Mummy (1970) colour, 77 minutes

Disc Four -
Fall Of The House Of Usher (1966) black and white, 50 minutes
The Open Door (1966) black and white, 54 minutes
Extract from Casting The Runes - 3 minutes (picture slightly warped)

Frankenstein stars Ian Holm. Dracula stars Denholm Elliot as the Count and the very lovely Susan George as Lucy. Freddie Jones is terrific as Sweeney Todd.

Also enclosed is an excellent 40-page colour booklet, which outlines the history of the show as well as giving detailed descriptions of all the episodes (including those that are now lost).

The four discs and booklet are housed in a case that is the same size as a regular DVD case. The picture and sound quality is top notch on the first three discs. The picture is not as good on the forth disc but is still very decent. All episodes are in full-screen. Each drama was clearly made on a low budget, yet still manages to look impressive. The colour episodes have a brilliantly creepy opening title sequence.

This is a very fine collection from Network that will appeal to anyone who is a fan of vintage British horror. Worth checking out too is Beasts, also released by Network.
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on 3 April 2014
I loved this series as a child. It is a real shame though that the first series with David Buck have been lost, they were wonderful and he was gorgeous. You can however play spot the star in the later episodes.
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on 5 August 2014
This was sixties television in it's heyday top ranking performances from Denholm Elliot, Susannah York,
Patrick Mower, Alan Dobie, Ian Holm, Freddie Jones, and of course Jack Hawkins and Jon Lawrie.
This series was followed by a supernatural series called "Haunted" starring Patrick Mower. Unfortunately
this latter series didn't survive.
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on 18 November 2011
A good few years before the BBC began its seminal "Ghost Story for Christmas" series, ITV were merrily knocking out supernatural classics in ABC's "Mystery and Imagination" series. Dramatising works by the likes of J. S. LeFanu, Bram Stoker, Mrs Oliphant and of course M.R. James, this series provided a rich mix of chilling classics. This lovely little box set brings together all the surviving episodes (only 8, sadly), comprising two from the ABC series and a further six from a little later on when Thames TV took over the production.

The Thames episodes feature higher production values and faster pacing and direction, although the earlier ABC episodes have their charm. Particularly tantalising is the inclusion of the surviving three minutes of M.R. James's "Casting the Runes", which seems a faithful and well made adapatation. What a pity so many of these ABC episodes are now lost.

The stand out for me was "Uncle Silas", featuring a brilliantly demented performance of the title character by Robert Eddison, in which he is mostly filmed from below for a more forbidding effect. It also brilliantly uses locations to enhance the production. Bram Stoker's "Dracula" was perhaps a little ambitious for the producers, who sensibly scaled it down to concentrate on the central part of the novel. Nevertheless, this one seems to have something missing. "Frankenstein" is faithful and thought provoking, and very well acted throughout.

Moving into colour, Robert Louis Stevenson's "The Suicide Club", along with "Sweeney Todd" have some new elements injected in to great effect. "The Curse of the Mummy", also filmed a few years earlier by Hammer, suffers from its studio bound production, feeling more like a play than a TV film, but still well done all round.

This is superbly packaged set. It is dated now, though the later Thames episodes seem much less dated than the ABC ones, particularly the colour ones. There's a lot to enjoy though, well made throughout and a wonderful idea for a TV series to put together classic stories along a similar theme (see also Thames TV's The Rivals Of Sherlock Holmes for more in this vein from this powerhouse of 70s British TV).
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