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4.5 out of 5 stars
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4.5 out of 5 stars
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on 1 July 2017
Happy with service and CD, thank you!
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on 28 June 2017
very good
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on 19 May 2017
Interesting album.
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on 10 June 2017
Quick delivery, no damage on cover and price as promised. Nothing to complain about.
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on 6 August 2007
While writing the follow up to 1978's Tormato, singer Jon Anderson and keyboardist, Rick Wakeman left the group.
This lineup of Yes is definitely the most controversial in the bands history. Combining the musical talents of Steve Howe, Chris Squire and Alan White with those of The Buggles (video killed the radio star anyone?) seemed a disasterous one. However, they got away with it and Drama stands for me as one of Yes' best efforts, despite being a somewhat neglected record.
OK Trevor Horn could never replace Jon Anderson on vocals, and most of the songs are crying out for his angelic tones. But there's a charm and sincerity about Horn's vocal style, and with Chris Squires distinctive backing vocal to supplement him, as well as Steve Howe mucking in, the vocal side of Drama is quite alright.
Geoff Downes is a revelation on keyboards, and he handles the 'widdly widdly' stuff excellently while throwing his own keyboarding style into the mix. It's no surprise that he would continue to work with Steve Howe on this type of music in the incredibly successful Asia.
As for Steve Howe, he plays some of his heaviest, most aggressive sounding guitar since 1974's Relayer, and the Chris Squire/Alan White rhythm section seems re energised and more driving than before.
The songs on Drama are first class. 'Machine Messiah' is a huge, moody behemoth of an opener with some superb melodies, great vocal harmonies, swirling keyboards and heavy metal guitar, hammered home with some great rolling bass, and thumping drums.
'White Car' is a beautifully sung track, but suffers from being a short song which ends almost as soon as it's begun.
'Does It Really Happen' is a pointer to the more commercial sounding music Yes would make in the 1980s. Despite this, it's catchy, powerful, and benefits from some superb bass playing from Squire.
'Into The Lens', like 'Machine Messiah', is a whopper of a song. It's stop/start style is reminiscent of early Genesis, and again the vocal harmonies are spot on. Also, the individual playing is excellent throughout the track.
'Run Through The Light' is a fairly traditional Yes piece with some good acoustic guitar and some cool keyboard sounds. It has an unusual vocal display from Trevor Horn, which has you wishing that Jon Anderson had sung on the track, other than that, it's another strong number.
Closing track 'Tempus Fugit' is a song strikingly similar to the kind of numbers The Police would make in the early eighties. It's dominated by Chris Squire's bass and Alan White's drums (they would use 'Tempus Fugit' live in Squire and White's joint solo), and Geoff Downes adds some more top notch swirling keyboard effects.
The production on Drama is tight as a drum (Horn would go on to become one of the world's premier music producers) and every member of the band gives 100%
The whole package is also once again complimented by the welcome return of some Roger Dean artwork. It's a slightly darker concept than before but just as effective, and brings back the visual identity that the band lost somewhat after 1975.
Yes fans never quite took to this line up of the band and I suppose it's understandable. Rick Wakeman had been replaced before, but for both he AND Jon Anderson to be absent, was too much for most Yes fans to take. However, for me Drama is a better album than the debut and Time And A Word. It's more entertaining than Tales From Topographic Oceans and Relayer, and wipes the floor with Tormato. It's also better produced than all five of those albums. For a Yes album without messrs Anderson and Wakeman, that's quite an achievement.
There will still be Yes fans who cannot comprehend a Yes album with The Buggles playing on it. I'm a Yes fan, and I'm afraid I f*****g love it.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 17 February 2016
I must admit to having a real soft spot for this curious album.

It is often overlooked by Yes fans because Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman had left the band by this stage. Instead, we have Trevor Horn of Buggles on lead vocals - not the greatest singer but he is competent.

The results are rather pleasing. The songwriting is excellent with 'Into the Lens' worthy of a special mention. The album is a curious mix but holds together well. In time-honoured tradition, the musicianship is superb.

Worth investigating.
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In retrospect this odd-ball 1980 album with Jon Anderson (uniquely) and Rick Wakeman (yet again) absent stayed faithful to the classic Yes sound and has worn the years well. The freshness Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes brought to the party was badly needed at the time, and the result is a lot more enjoyable than its disappointing predecessor `Tormato'.

Although Trevor Horn's vocal range does not quite match Anderson's distinctive soaring falsetto, his vocal style is so close you hardly notice the difference (Horn had always been a big fan of Yes' music) and his lyrical flourishes do fit the classic Yes mould. The more-than-competent Geoff Downes was Yes' fourth keyboard player in 12 years, and as with Patrick Moraz his playing blends seamlessly with Steve Howe's fast virtuoso guitar licks, Chris Squire's masterful bass lines and the precise & energetic drumming of Alan White to create a mouth-watering cocktail whilst adding a uniquely individual flavour to the sound.

`Machine Messiah' for some fans easily makes it into the top 10 of Yes' best numbers, and it's a pity that on his return to the band, Jon Anderson always refused to sing it (or any of the `Drama' songs) onstage.

Overall verdict: very good. It's a pity so many diehard Yes fans can't get past the absence of Jon Anderson on this album, but in Trevor Horn's defence it's difficult to imagine any replacement singer at the time who could have delivered a better performance. And Horn went on to produce the great 1983 follow-up `90125' which saw Anderson return to the mike fronting the band.

Final note: it's difficult to dissent from the general view that listeners are best to stick with the original six album tracks, and pass on the `pointless additions' to the later CD releases which do not enhance the reputation of Yes.
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on 20 September 2008
I have been a Yes fan since the seventies, but was put off investigating Drama all the way up to the year 2000. The reason being, as many may guess, is that this is the only Yes album with no contribution from Jon Anderson, who not only has a very distinctive voice (not liked by everyone), but is also a big song/music writer for the group. The idea that he could be replaced (along with Wakeman) by members of the Buggles was frankly unthinkable.

How wrong I was. For a start, Trevor Horn's voice is actually very good - he has a similar tone to Anderson, but more nasal and earthy. Downes can play as well, there is some great interplay between himself and Squire on the first track "Machine Messiah". And while we're on the subject of Squire, I think this album has some of his best Bass riffs ever - his intro for "Does it really Happen?" is epic. "Into the Lens" is another highlight, with many strangely timed sections and a catchy chorus. "Tempus Fugit" is also a great track, although the "Yes!" lyrics are a little grating (no more than Jon's were sometimes though). In fact, there are no weak tracks on this album at all. It doesn't quite attain the creative peaks of the classic Yes albums, but it is better than Tormato and all of that "Yeswest" AOR nonsense that followed.

I would have really liked to hear another album from this line-up, the songs may be shorter, but it is %100 Prog. If you like Yes, you must buy it - it's an essential purchase. If you like the sound of Yes but not Anderson's Choir-boy noodlings, you may also enjoy it.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 17 February 2016
I must admit to having a real soft spot for this curious album.

It is often overlooked by Yes fans because Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman had left the band by this stage. Instead, we have Trevor Horn of Buggles on lead vocals - not the greatest singer but he is competent.

The results are rather pleasing. The songwriting is excellent with 'Into the Lens' worthy of a special mention. The album is a curious mix but holds together well. In time-honoured tradition, the musicianship is superb.

Worth investigating.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 17 February 2016
I must admit to having a real soft spot for this curious album.

It is often overlooked by Yes fans because Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman had left the band by this stage. Instead, we have Trevor Horn of Buggles on lead vocals - not the greatest singer but he is competent.

The results are rather pleasing. The songwriting is excellent with 'Into the Lens' worthy of a special mention. The album is a curious mix but holds together well. In time-honoured tradition, the musicianship is superb.

Worth investigating.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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