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4.6 out of 5 stars
46
4.6 out of 5 stars
Format: DVD|Change
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on 28 April 2016
Both films are wonderful. And shows the cast in on great form, even Orson Wells odd irish accent.
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on 8 August 2017
Fantastic
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on 19 May 2017
Great film!
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on 28 June 2017
Great transfer, outstanding supplements and a very worthwhile booklet make this a valuable addition to my collection.
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on 24 May 2017
Good service
Excellent film, a classic
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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 22 January 2016
This insanely entertaining film from 1948 is famous for two things: its audacious denouement in a deserted fairground Hall of Mirrors, and Rita Hayworth's short dyed-blonde hair. Both are certainly memorable, yet there's so much to admire in Welles's breathtaking fourth film as director (after Kane, Magnificent Ambersons & The Stranger).
Welles looks youthful, dapper and handsome here, as a feckless Irish adventurer who falls in with, and falls in love with - well, who wouldn't! - Hayworth as the wife of a wealthy but crippled Everett Sloane. All give superb performances, this being one of Hayworth's best, not long after her career-defining Gilda. (Ah, Gilda...)
Sloane pitches himself around on crutches throughout - like a movie precursor of Antony Sher's Richard III - which, oddly, makes him more dynamic, more unpredictable. But nothing can be predicted in this sickly story of duplicity, lust, and betrayal.
It starts almost like a tale by Melville or Conrad, with seafaring types and an invitation/challenge. It soon turns into a tale involving a sultry, grave femme fatale (guess who), Welles unusually restrained as a tousle-haired sap, and a boatload of wisecracking types, in an eccentric film noir - possibly the only noir set at sea or on an Acapulco beach.
Orson and Rita were married at the time, but their union was coming to an end, which happily gives their scenes together a natural, serious-humourous bantering rhythm, as if Hayworth had absorbed his easygoing way with a script - all overlapping dialogue and discarded sentences. She is seldom mentioned when people talk of the great film actresses, but she could be, and was, when given a good part by a sympathetic director.
I haven't mentioned the most outlandish, offbeat, quite hilarious performance in the film. It's courtesy of stage actor Glenn Anders, as a sweaty, large-faced, giggling, insinuating - well, what exactly is he? See the film to find out. His is one of cinema's maddest portrayals of barely suppressed hysteria - Ronald Shiner meets Peter Lorre? - a man who seems to be everywhere, round every shadowy corner, ready to enjoy his own unlikely presence in others' lives, a dangerous but oddly lovable maniac. (If the Academy had any sense - and pigs might fly - they'd have not only given the film a few nods, but nominated Anders in the Best Supporting category, if only for sheer chutzpah).
A courtroom scene late in the film is like a parody of all courtroom scenes, with a sneezing jury member, an affably beaming judge, and the law barely observed. Yet one more audacity dreamed up by its wayward director-genie/genius.
I can't be any more sane or rational about this gloriously enjoyable piece of craziness than I can about another wonderful Welles folly, Touch of Evil, so I'll just say that if you love 'pure cinema' you have to see this. Then you'll want to see it again, and again - like endlessly replicating images in a hall of mirrors...

There's nothing remotely like it.
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on 8 August 2015
This DVD was only a little bit more money than one DVD on it's own so two films for the price of one not bad, the film actress who is the female star of the film was married to male lead at the time but were separated, Rita Heywood was one of the Manny beauty's of the time and Orson Welles was at the start of a long career,
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on 13 July 2013
An excellent print of Miss Sadie Thompson. As fresh as the day I saw it in 1954. Good colour, no blemishes, scratches, etc.
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on 23 June 2015
Several excellent aspects to the film unbelievably bad Irish accent aside. A great talent making an interesting movie. Well worth a watch.
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on 2 June 2015
A fine film but not one of his best.
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