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Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
27
It Came from Beneath the Sea [DVD] [1955] [2003]
Format: DVD|Change
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on 30 July 2017
Great movie
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on 5 March 2015
Must see movie.
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on 18 October 2017
Too much romance not enough monster!
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VINE VOICEon 21 July 2013
"For centuries the mind of man has learned comparative little of the mysteries of the heavens above - or the seas below"

"Since the coming of the atomic age, man's knowledge has so increased that an upheaval of nature would not be beyond his belief."

It is 1955 and the atom sub looks just like a ww2 diesel (at least it does not look like a cardboard mockup.) The latest sub is being chased by thing or things unknown; let's just say that "It Came from Beneath the Sea".

Standard sci-fi for the time we have the obligatory romance between the captain, Cmdr. Pete Mathews (Kenneth Tobey) from "The Thing From Another World" (1951), and Prof. Lesleyl Joyce (Faith Domergue) from "This Island Earth" (1955). What a ménage à trios and Prof. John Carter (Donald Curtis) from several "Science Fiction Theater" (1955-1957) TV episodes.

I just love sci-fi from this time because they inevitably depend of flame throwers to do the trick as in "The deadly Mantis" and "Them!"

Naturally no one believes them until they get eaten. Others think they have the situation in hand. Will we be able to handle "IT"? And will there be a next time?

Six tentacle monster by Ray Harryhausen; "Clash of the Titans" (1981).
Screen play by Hal Smith, and George Worthing Yates.
Faith Domergue, by God.

It Came From Outer Space
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HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERon 18 May 2012
The beginning of his long-running relationship with Columbia Pictures and his lifelong partnership with producer Charles H. Schneer - albeit under the auspices of churn `em out fast and cheap executive producer Sam Katzman - It Came from Beneath the Sea is one of Ray Harryhausen's earliest creature features and, sadly, one of his weakest. The biggest problem is that most of the first hour is taken up with conversations, briefings and press conferences as the unseen object that damaged the Navy's latest nuclear sub is finally revealed to be a giant octopus drawn to the surface in search of food after becoming irradiated in a nuclear test and inadvertently warning off its natural prey. Guess who's on the menu now...

Unfortunately the infamously six tentacled beast (easier to animate) stays unseen for all but a couple of minutes in that opening hour, not really breaking the surface properly until the one hour mark when it develops a taste for the Golden Gate Bridge. Up until then we have to make do with fairly flatly directed and acted speculation and mild romantic complications as the reliable Kenneth Tobey's sub commander woos Faith Domergue's marine biologist away from scientist Donald Curtis, which isn't difficult since he doesn't put up a fight (not too surprising with Domergue hardly setting the screen alight). When the destruction finally comes it's worth the wait - just - though it's a definite step down from Harryhausen's much better funded first solo stop motion animation effort The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, which also starred Tobey.

Columbia's Blu-ray offers both the original black and white version and the typically unconvincingly colorised version, which impressed Harryhausen more than it's likely to impress audiences. Like most colorised prints it's good on a few colors and very unconvincing on most, with flesh tomes in particular a very sickly looking khaki that blends in with the military uniforms. The black and white version doesn't really gain much from Bluray for much of the movie, offering the kind of transfer the DVD should have had while exposing the limitations of the original photography, though the daylight effects scenes look considerably better than any previous release, with an exceptional level of detail (the night attacks are less impressive). Less welcome is the cropping to 1.85:1, a ratio the film almost certainly was not seen in during its original release in 1955, though thankfully there's no damagingly overcropped shots as occurs in a couple of places in the Blurays and DVDs of The 7th Voyage of Sinbad and Earth Vs. The Flying Saucers. There's a very decent array of extras - audio commentary by Ray Harryhausen, Randall William Cook, John Bruno and Arnold Kunert, featurettes Remembering It Came From Beneath the Sea, Tim Burton Sits Down with Ray Harryhausen and David Schecter on Film Music's Unsung Hero, stills and poster galleries, preview of digital comic book and trailers for Earth Vs. The Flying Saucers, 20 Million Miles to Earth and The 7th Voyage of Sinbad - though for some reason the original trailer is only included on other Harryhausen titles.
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on 26 January 2004
After sending a dinosaur down the eastern coast to wreak havoc on NY(in 'The Beast from 20000 Fathoms') now it is Harryhausens pleasure to do the same to the western coast and San Francisco. This time it is a giant octopus (due to budgetary reasons with only six legs). The plot is roughly the same: Giant creature disturbed by nuclear weapons tests is looking for food and finds humans. The heroes are as usual 2 scientists (1 male, 1 female) and a military officer. Contrary to tradition the resulting love triangle is not solved the usual way. The leading actress has some resemblance to Sigourney Weaver (in looks and role). The obvious star of the movie is of course the monster and its attack on the Golden Gate Bridge is an iconic image. In quite a number of scenes it looks really lifelike not just like a stop-motion model. Ray Harryhausen remains the god of animation and this movie belongs into the collection of every fan!
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on 16 March 2017
I suppose it is partly about Faith Domergue's strong-minded woman. There are plenty of moments which insist on her superiority. In fact she designs a missile. Wow. Her squeeze is leather-necked oldster Kenneth Tobey. A bit embarrassing really. The monster is, despite the Harryhausen name, a rubber tentacle or two. Beyond that lies nothing.
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VINE VOICEon 9 August 2011
"For centuries the mind of man has learned comparative little of the mysteries of the heavens above - or the seas below"

"Since the coming of the atomic age, man's knowledge has so increased that an upheaval of nature would not be beyond his belief."

It is 1955 and the atom sub looks just like a ww2 diesel (at least it does not look like a cardboard mockup.) The latest sub is being chased by thing or things unknown; let's just say that "It Came from Beneath the Sea".

Standard sci-fi for the time we have the obligatory romance between the captain, Cmdr. Pete Mathews (Kenneth Tobey) from "The Thing From Another World" (1951), and Prof. Lesleyl Joyce (Faith Domergue) from "This Island Earth" (1955). What a ménage à trios and Prof. John Carter (Donald Curtis) from several "Science Fiction Theater" (1955-1957) TV episodes.

I just love sci-fi from this time because they inevitably depend of flame throwers to do the trick as in "The deadly Mantis" and "Them!"

Naturally no one believes them until they get eaten. Others think they have the situation in hand. Will we be able to handle "IT"? And will there be a next time?

Six tentacle monster by Ray Harryhausen; "Clash of the Titans" (1981).
Screen play by Hal Smith, and George Worthing Yates.
Faith Domergue, by God.

It Came From Outer Space
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VINE VOICEon 10 June 2006
"For centuries the mind of man has learned comparative little of the mysteries of the heavens above - or the seas below"

"Since the coming of the atomic age, man's knowledge has so increased that an upheaval of nature would not be beyond his belief."

It is 1955 and the atom sub looks just like a ww2 diesel (at least it does not look like a cardboard mockup.) The latest sub is being chased by thing or things unknown; let's just say that "It Came from Beneath the Sea".

Standard sci-fi for the time we have the obligatory romance between the captain, Cmdr. Pete Mathews (Kenneth Tobey) from "The Thing From Another World" (1951), and Prof. Lesleyl Joyce (Faith Domergue) from "This Island Earth" (1955). What a ménage à trios and Prof. John Carter (Donald Curtis) from several "Science Fiction Theater" (1955-1957) TV episodes.

I just love sci-fi from this time because they inevitably depend of flame throwers to do the trick as in "The deadly Mantis" and "Them!"

Naturally no one believes them until they get eaten. Others think they have the situation in hand. Will we be able to handle "IT"? And will there be a next time?

Six tentacle monster by Ray Harryhausen; "Clash of the Titans" (1981).
Screen play by Hal Smith, and George Worthing Yates.
Faith Domergue, by God.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 26 May 2011
In the 1950s cinema was subjected to (graciously in my case) a number of things that came to wreak havoc on mankind. Be it nuclear enhanced spiders and ants marching forth from the desert or various beings from outer space come to deliver alien fury. Hell we even had giant water snails laying slimy waste to all in their way. But what of the ocean? So much potential down there. Rhedosaurus and Gojira had come from the sea to lay a marker down for the big lizard, but what of the natural creatures? Sharks? Well Spielberg's genre daddy was some 20 years away. Whales? Crabs? Squids? Ah what about a giant Octopus? Now there is scope for a riot. Lets make him a product of atomic blasting, awoken from the Mindanao Deep, keep it sympathetic 9it's just being natural after all), set up an attack on a bastion landmark of Americana and get stop-mo genius Ray Harryhausen to work his wonders.

So they did. It Came from Beneath the Sea, if you pardon the pun, holds its head above water in the creature feature, sci-fi schlockers genre. Starring Faith Domergue (This Island Earth), Kenneth Tobey (The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms) and Donald Curtis (Earth vs. The Flying Saucers), it has safe and solid genre credentials. Though guilty of being over talky, in that the science being offered up isn't worthy of such meanderings, the script does allow for a feminism angle that should be applauded for the time it was made. Even if it's almost smothered by the love tryst shenanigans of our three central players that is. Filmed on location in San Francisco to add some level of authenticity to the story and having a running time that doesn't let it outstay its welcome. It Came from Beneath the Sea is a fine genre piece worthy of yearly revisits. 7/10
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