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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 3 August 2017
Columbia Classics/Sony are releasing/have released some wonderful films on DVD and packed them with extras including optional English subtitles. This is one of them! For it's day I would say it is pretty violent. The fight scenes are tough, and, forgive me, no punches are pulled. I don't think I have seen Bogart give quite such a powerful performence as he does here as washed up sportswriter Eddie Willis. He is matched in the acting stakes by a relatively restrained Rod Steiger as corrupt promoter Benko. The whole cast is good, and if, for the sake of one grumble...I wish there was a good cast list at the end...so many familiar faces! Mike Lane does well as Toro (I remember him in "Hell Canyon Outlaws/Tall Trouble"), and Jan Sterling gives her usual strong performence as Eddie's wife. Look out for Max Baer, he may not be the world's best actor, but you "wouldn't want to know him when he was angry" (where does that phrase come from??). A truly classic film and a must for film lovers everywhere, but be aware, it's a tough film! Excellent 16.9 ratio (fills my whole screen), clear B/w picture and good sound, plus the aforementioned optional subtitles.
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on 8 March 2017
Very good film, Bogie at his best.
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on 29 July 2017
Another good Bogy film; if you like the actor buy it.
Excellant production quality.
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on 9 October 2016
great
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on 10 June 2017
Everything is okay from you. Thank you.
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on 18 January 2018
good old fim
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 25 November 2010
Eddie Willis was once a top sports writer, but now he is down on his luck and searching for work. He gets a proposition from dodgy promoter Nick Benko, he is to write up sensationalist press for Benko's new discovery, the gigantic Toro Moreno. Trouble is is that Moreno is a poor boxer, powder puff punches and a glass jaw. But each fight is fixed by Benko and along with Eddie's press writings, this propels Moreno to being a household name, thus a crack at the heavyweight title is in the offering. However, Eddie starts to feel conflicted the more the story unfolds and just around the corner is a tragedy that will shape the destinies of everyone who is involved.

This was sadly to be the last film from the great Humphrey Bogart. He would pass away the following year, but thankfully this Mark Robson directed piece proves to be a fitting swansong. He puts depth to his portrayal of Willis and his face off scenes with Rod Steiger's Benko are a real acting joy to observe. The film itself {great scripting from Phillip Yordan} is a scathing and critical look at the boxing circuit, corruption, greed and a scant care for human life come bubbling to the surface, with Burnett Guffey's stark black & white photography adding grime to the nasty underbelly. Real life {and one time heavyweight champion of the world} boxer Primo Carnera sued {and lost} Columbia because The Harder They Fall's story was close enough to his own life story, that in itself makes this film's core story all the more interesting. 8/10
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on 4 June 2014
This was the great Humphrey Bogart’s last film, shot in late 1955 and early 1956 when he was already seriously ill with throat cancer. He nonetheless turns in a convincing performance as cynical yet ultimately compassionate sports journalist Eddie Willis. He hypes up no hoper Toro Moreno as a credible contender for the world championship and when the likeable but naive young boxer is cheated out of his winnings by crooked promoter Nick Benko (a young Rod Steiger is very good as the bent manager) he selflessly gives the big Argentinian (played by Mike Lane) his own share of the take and sends him home and out of the reach of the mob.

There is good support from Jan Sterling as Bogart’s wife and real life boxers Max Baer, Jersey Joe Walcott (both ex-heavyweight champions) and Pat Comiskey who actually fought Max Baer in a non title bout in 1940 but lost.

I think this was one of Bogie’s best and despite fighting cancer I thought he did not look particularly old or particularly ill, a tribute to his professionalism.
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on 22 October 2015
Good to a good print of his last film.
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on 10 April 2004
This 1956 picture was screen legend Humprhey Bogart's last. Playing a sports journalist Bogart watches the rise and fall of a boxfigther used by unscrepoulous managers and promoters.
Humphrey Bogart plays a great caracther in this picture, very much in the mold of his famous screen persona, but this time with a gentelness that was not always so obvious in other pictures.
Filmed in widescreen with b/w photography, the dvd presents a good copy of the film with lots of subtitles.
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